Marcus houston partner

Prior to joining The Friedkin Group, Mr. Watts was Vice Chairman and Managing Partner-Houston of the 700-attorney law firm of Locke Lord LLP, with over 26 years of experience in corporate and securities law, governance and related matters. Mr. Watts served on the Board of Complete Production Services, Inc. from March 2007 until February 2012 ... Marcus Alan Helt Partner [email protected] Dallas 214.999.4526. Overview Capabilities Insights. Overview. Bankruptcy attorney Marcus Helt has a national debtor-focused bankruptcy practice, primarily comprising the restructuring of companies in and out of bankruptcy, debtors' rights, debtor-in-possession financers and acquisitions of distressed ... View Marcus Houston’s profile on LinkedIn, the world's largest professional community. Marcus has 6 jobs listed on their profile. ... Co Founder, Partner, Sales Z Box Mattress. Sep 2016 ... Managing Partner. Marcus received his BBA from Texas A&M University. He received his JD from Boston College Law School and has an LLM in Health Law from the University of Houston Law Center. Marcus began his legal career in the Chief Counsel’s Office of the United States Food and Drug Administration prosecuting pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers for violations of the Federal ... [email protected] (716)795-6636. Ongoing Searches. ... These positions range from the senior associate to partner level. Positions are available in most major cities. Tax Accounting. Numerous openings with National, Regional and Boutique firms focused on preparing taxes for businesses. Last week the Internet was abuzz when molestation accusations against singer Marques Houston and manager producer Chris Stokes resurfaced. Former B2K band member DeMario 'Raz-B' Thornton released ... Marcus Houston Co Founder, Partner, Sales at Z Box Mattress and The Zeida Company. Hickory/Lenoir, North Carolina Area. Marcus Houston. Marcus Houston Partnership Sales Coordinator at New York ... Joel Aud Project: Border Management, Trade, and Transport Security Course Curriculum Development Course Developer Institution: Lean Tail Labs Jessica Bolter Project: Developing a Regional Approach to Managing Migration Flows from the Northern Triangle through Mexico to the United States Institution: Migration Policy Institute Marcus A. Boyd, Ph.D. Project: The Road Less Traveled: Bolstering ... Ara Partners is a private equity firm specializing in industrial decarbonization investments. Ara Partners invests in the industrial & manufacturing, chemicals & materials, energy efficiency & green fuels and food & agriculture sectors, seeking to build businesses that are focused on sustainability and ESG principles. Neiman Marcus is permanently closing its Washington, D.C. store, the latest addition after the company first announced in July it would shutter four department stores and 17 off-price Neiman ...

Taking a look at every post-Jordan era Eastern Conference Champion - 1999-2003

2020.10.02 17:00 TheMagicMan56 Taking a look at every post-Jordan era Eastern Conference Champion - 1999-2003

I've been reading about the weakness of the East after Jordan left and how it was a cakewalk for western teams in the Finals. The East team managed to win 8 out of the 10 past Finals, with only the Knicks and the Magic failing to do so, and now that MJ left, lost 5 Finals in a row as a heavy underdog. I wasn't old enough to watch or remember those games, so I decided to analyze the Eastern Conference champion for the every season since 1998-99 (MJ left) to 2002-03 (since the Pistons managed to upset one of the most talented teams ever assembled the season after that), to try to understand what they were about, how they played, what their road to the Finals was, how tough it was and ultimately why did they get outmatched in the Finals the way they did.

1998-99 Knicks
Let's be fair to the Knicks, they overachieved massively and were the first 8th seed to make the Finals in NBA history, all credit to Jeff Van Gundy for that. The amazing part in all of this is that their best player, former superstar center, Patrick Ewing was missing for the most of the ECF. They had an above .500 record in the lockout shortened season which was good enough for the 8th seed. This meant they were taking on the Mourning/Hardaway led Heat with a good supporting cast.
The Knicks didn't do anything amazing on offense, with their best scorer with 16 PPG being Latrell Sprewell who came off the bench, but were amazing on defense. The Heat, who finished the regular season with around 105 points scored on average, didn't score more than 87 points in any of their 5 games. Mourning still did his thing with 22/8 and 3 blocks on average, but his sidekick, Tim Hardaway, didn't show up at all. Tim dropped his season averages from 17/7 on 40/36/81 shooting down to 9/6 on 27/20/63 shooting. Dan Majerle didn't help out either averaging only 4 PPG on 19 FG% and that effort by the Knicks defense, as well as Houston being tremendously efficient on offense, meant the Knicks would upset the 8th seed in 5 games and move on to Atlanta in the 2nd Round.
Atlanta was an easier task for the Knicks. The Hawks were seen as a defensive team, having finished second in defensive rating in the league and having defensive studs like Dikembe Mutombo and Mookie Blaylock. This still didn't prevent the Knicks' 6th man Sprewell in torching them for 23 points a game. Houston chipped in with 18 PPG and the story remained the same in the Second Round. The Hawks didn't really have a good offensive player other than Steve Smith who the Knicks kept in check well, with him averaging 16 PPG on 27 FG%. With Smith neutralized and the Knicks offense rolling, New York managed to sweep the Hawks easily.
Moving on to the ECF and the historic Knicks-Pacers rivalry. The Pacers were deep and were looking to make a push for a spot in the Finals with Jordan out of the way. They had a lot of solid veterans such as Reggie, Mark Jackson, Rik Smits, the Davis boys, Chris Mullin and Sam Perkins, as well as their new talented prospect, Jalen Rose. They managed to split the first two games of the series, but the Knicks were facing a huge problem after Game 2. Their starting center, Ewing, was out for the remainder of the playoffs. Everyone counted them out at this point, the Pacers swept every team until now and were far more experienced. The Knicks had their little fairytale run, but it seemed to be over. Jeff Van Gundy adjusted and the Knicks played a faster paced offense than usual. The Knicks managed to grab game 3 to everyone's shock, with that iconic Larry Johnson buzer beater and won the series in 6. Defense wasn't the key part for them in this series, it was their offense. 4 Knicks players averaged over 14 PPG for the series and Marcus Camby played out of his mind. He averaged 14/11 with 3 blocks on 58 FG% and the Knicks shocked everyone as they made the Finals. Their great play throughout the series prompted the term "The Ewing theory" which was about teams' playing better with their star player out.
Without Ewing the Knicks were no match for the Spurs and their "Twin Towers". Duncan dominated, meanwhile Robinson had a good series himself as well. Sprewell and Houston each averaged 20+ PPG, but no one else on that New York team even averaged more than 10. Houston shot terrible from the three and the Knicks had absolutely no answer for Timmy. They managed to take a game, but that was all they could muster. Their massive underdog story came to an end and the first heavily predictable Finals was out of the way.
1999-00 Pacers
The 90s just wasn't the Indiana's decade, with them falling just short of making the Finals several times. They had a great record this year, a good group of veterans making a last attempt at a run for a title, with the emergence of the talented Jalen Rose, who provided Reggie Miller a partner on offense to share the load with, making their offense the best in the league. Things were all set, but the road to the ECF wasn't as easy as last year.
The Bucks gave Indiana a lot of problems in the First Round. The Allen/Cassell/Robinson Big 3 showed their worth and Tim Thomas also provided some much needed help for them off the bench. Reggie and Rose both had good series' and Dale Davis showed why he was an All-Star that year, providing a big body down low which the Bucks lacked and leading 4 out of 5 games in rebounding. The Pacers avoided a scare and a loss to the 8th seed for the second time in a row, by a 1 point win in Game 5.
The early 2000s Sixer teams are praised for their defense, same goes for this one. The Pacers still managed to carve them open and score over 100 points in 3 out of their 4 wins with Reggie Miller having a God series with 26 points on 52/47/96 shooting and Jalen Rose following his lead with 22 points on 43/44/86 averages. Iverson did his thing, although not very efficiently, but he had help too with McKie, Hill and Ratliff all averaging above their season averages in scoring. Reggie and the Pacers still handled their business well and got past Philadephia in 6 games.
Incoming Knicks-Pacers part 2. For the sequel to last years ECF we had an entertaining series. On one side Reggie and Jalen were doing their thing and on the other Houston and Larry Johnson were shooting lights out from three, averaging 58% and 57% respectively with Spree doing his thing as usual. Indiana got the better of New York this time around and the difference maker was in my opinion their center, Dale Davis. Dale averaged 9/14 on 54% shooting against an aging Ewing, Camby and Thomas. His 14 rebounds a game average was by far the most out of anyone this series, beating out second placed Ewing by double.
I have to give credit to this Pacers team, they managed to win 2 games in the Finals against the Lakers, keep another 3 relatively close and keep Kobe on 16 PPG, 37 FG% averages. This was just one of the best individual Finals performances I've ever seen by Shaq. The man averaged 38/17 with 3 blocks on 61 FG%. He was just absolutely unstoppable. Reggie and Jalen kept up their good play in the Finals and Austin Croshere did good as well, but that wasn't enough. I praised Dale Davis in this post a couple of times, but him and Rik Smits were just no match for Shaq, who was on a clear mission.
2000-01 76ers
Like I said previously, this 76ers team was praised for their defense, and rightfully so. Their whole offense revolved around Iverson, who was the league's MVP this year, and some help from McKie off the bench, meanwhile their defense was a team effort. Players like Lynch, Snow and Hill were starters just for that side of the ball. They also had two solid rim protectors that season. Theo Ratliff, who was averaging 12/8 and leading the lead in blocks with 3.7 that year, was named an All-Star and traded for another All-Star rim protector, Dikembe Mutombo, to the Hawks during the season. Mutombo became a key factor in that 76ers defense and went on to win the DPOY in that season. Iverson was not a liability on defense either, he led the league in steals with 2.5 a game. COTY, 6MOTY, DPOY, a top 5 defense in the league and the league MVP being their offense, they were set for the playoffs.
A rematch was scheduled against the Pacers in the First Round and the 76ers managed to get revenge. This analysis made me respect Reggie a lot more than I did before. The man averaged 31 points on 46/43/93 averages at age 35. The MVP played in MVP fashion with 32 PPG and got some help from 6MOTY McKie on offense and DPOY Mutombo on defense to get the job done in 4 games, despite Reggie's best efforts.
The Raptors were a team slightly similar to the 76ers in my opinion. They had a clear star in Vince Carter, his sidekick big man Antonio Davis and role players who knew what their roles were. It was a highly entertaining 7 game series, with the last game coming down to the last possession. AI and VC were going at it, and Davis had an excellent series as well. Game 7 though wasn't the AI vs VC battle we were used to throughout the series, it was surprisingly the McKie vs Davis battle. Allen and Vince both had bad shooting, 21 and 20 point games respectively, but their number 2 options came in big. McKie had 22 on 50% shooting, meanwhile AD had 23/9 on 73%. The series was decided by a Vince Carter miss off of a great pump fake and the 76ers were marching their way to the Conference Finals.
On come the Bucks, in the series that some call one of the worst officiated series of all time. The battle of the Big 3s this time around with the Bucks Big 3 of Allen/Cassell/Robinson and the 76ers Big 3 of Iverson/Mutombo/McKie all having great series'. In addition to them being on their level, Thomas and Ervin Johnson for the Bucks and Hill and Jumaine Jones for the Sixers were all important additions. The large controversy that surrounded the series was because of the refs favoring the Sixers with having them shoot 186 as opposed to Milwaukee's 120. Iverson and Mutombo shot 55 and 58 FTs respectively, meanwhile the highest amount of free throws a Bucks player shot was Cassell with 35. The 76ers won in 7, with Iverson putting up 44 points in the final game.
Moving on to the third Finals in a row in which the western team was a heavy favorite to win in. The Lakers managed to back up all the talk and eliminated Philly in a gentleman's sweep. The Sixers managed to shock everyone and win Game 1, but it was all smooth sailing since that. The Shaq/Mutombo matchup was more one sided than people thought, McKie dropped his scoring numbers significantly and Iverson did his thing. Shaq played yet another dominant Finals, 33/16/5/3, and Kobe played his part as well with 25/8/6. The Sixers defense had no match for their dynamic duo, with great contributions coming from Fisher and Horry as well, especially shooting the deep ball.
2001-02 Nets
Jason Kidd managed to transform the Nets from a 26 to a 52 win team and an ECF champion in just one season. That's pretty amazing if you ask me. The Nets were a balanced team in every sense of the word. They basically had 3 number one options on offense with Kidd, Martin and Van Horn all averaging around 14 points a game and taking similar amount of shots a game. Kittles wasn't far behind also, with the 40% deep ball shooter averaging a solid 13 a game. Jefferson and Harris were nice sparks off the bench as well and having a top 5 defense was a major part of their success, as they were always looking to score from a fast break with Kidd leading the way.
First Round against a young Pacers team, trouble already. Reggie kept doing his thing at age 36 (this man's longevity was amazing) with good, efficient scoring and Jermaine O'Neal gave us a glimpse of what was to come in the future with 17/7 averages. Tinsley had a really off series, dropping his season averages of 9/8 to 4/5 and Artest and Brad Miller didn't hit their prime yet for them to be having more major impact. Kidd (22/6/8, 2 steals) and Kenyon (19/7) played amazing and the Nets managed to barely get past Indiana.
The Hornets got past the T-Mac Magic in the First Round, but the Second Round was a different story. They were a pretty average team, with the emphasis being on defense with players like Baron Davis, P.J. Brown, George Lynch, Elden Campbell and Jamal Magloire getting substantial minutes. It showed for a period, Davis averaged 4 steals this series and Campbell averaged 3 blocks. All the Nets players basically averaged their season averages that series, with J Kidd even upping his scoring from 14 to 18 points a game. That was all the Nets needed to comfortably take care of this Hornets team in 5.
"The Truth" has arrived and Antoine with him. The duo of Pierce and Walker truly played great, with the averages of 24/9/4 and 23/10/4 respectively, but the Nets had more depth. Aside from Kenny Anderson and Rodney Rogers giving some help scoring wise, the other Celtic players just didn't contribute much on that side of the ball, meanwhile the Nets, like I said, were a really balanced team. They had 6 players (Kidd, Kittles, Martin, Van Horn, Harris and Williams) average double digit points, meanwhile Kidd managed to average a triple double, 18/11/10. The depth of this Nets team really showed and prevailed this series, managing to close them out in 6 hard fought games, with both Pierce and Walker having an awful Game 6.
Listen, the Nets were never going to win this series. The Lakers three-peated with a sweep, Shaq was the most dominant player in the league and showed it in yet another Finals averaging 36/12 with 3 blocks, Kobe played even more convincingly than last time dropping 27/6/5 on 51/55/80 shooting and Fisher, Fox and Horry were slinging it from three on great percentages (67, 46, 46). The Nets didn't have a center that can match-up with Shaq and the combination of MacCulloch and Collins was never going to cut it. On the bright side, Kidd (21/7/10 with 2 steals) and Martin (22/7) had great series' and managed to keep the score respectable for 3 out of 4 games.
2002-03 Nets
Yet another Nets team on this list, this time with a slightly new look. They traded their starting center, Todd MacCulloch, and starting small forward, Keith Van Horn, in order to get the former multiple time DPOY winner, Dikembe Mutombo, to bolster their interior D. Mutombo went on to play only 24 games for this Nets team during the regular season and when he did, it was bellow expectations. Kidd and Martin each improved their scoring numbers, meanwhile Jefferson emerged into a starter who was dropping 16 a night. Harris also improved his scoring and the team, despite having a below average offense, had the top rated defense in the league which helped them in securing the second seed in the East.
A difficult, well balanced Bucks team to start the playoffs off. The Bucks were the second best offense in the league that year, having some really solid offensive players like Gary Payton, Sam Cassell, Tim Thomas, Michael Redd and Toni Kukoc. They traded their star, Ray Allen, for Seattle's star veteran, Gary Payton, mid season. The three main guys for the Bucks that series were Payton, Thomas and Cassell with the averages of 19, 18 and 17 points respectively. They also got double-digit scoring averages from Kukoc and Desmond Mason, which led to 5 of their players averaging 10 or more points. The center positions was a slight problem for them, because even with Joel Przybilla and Ervin Johnson starting games there, and playing really bad, an undersized Anthony Mason got the most minutes at center. Still, Jason Collins wasn't a good scorer at that spot for the Nets, so he couldn't full advantage of it. The Nets also had 5 players in double-digit scoring wise, with Martin, 22, and Kidd, 18, leading the way. This battle of two very balanced teams went New Jersey's way in 6 games, as this was the first season where the First Round was played as the best of 7.
The Nets-Celtics rematch was set, this time in the Second Round as opposed to last year's ECF. "The Truth" arrived again in style, averaging 29/9/8 with 3 steals. Even though Pierce was playing amazing, Antoine failed to show up this time. Antoine was a huge piece for them this year, making his third All-Star Game, averaging 20/7/5 during the regular season, only to put up 14 a game during this series. Tony Delk had to step up as the second option for Boston and as for the rest of the help Pierce had, it wasn't all that. The Nets on the other hand played amazing basketball, with Martin and Kidd continuing to have great playoffs' and Jefferson stepping up big with 18/7/4 averages. It was a routine sweep for them, Pierce couldn't do it on his own.
This was the same Pistons team that won the Finals against the Lakers the next year, just without Rasheed Wallace, and the Nets handled them easily in 4 games. Chauncey had an awful series and all of the scoring load was on Rip Hamilton, whose only help on offense came from 36-year old Clifford Robinson. Ben Wallace played out of his mind on defense averaging 17 boards and 3.5 blocks a game, but that still wasn't enough for them to even win a game. Despite me bringing up how balanced the Nets were on offense, in this series they offense relied on Kidd and Martin heavily, and they came through. The first two games were close, while the last two were blowouts. The Pistons lacked the Billups they had during the regular season to try and pull off something.
This Finals series might be the closest and most balanced one of them all. The Spurs weren't a superteam yet, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili haven't reached their primes, meanwhile the "Twin Towers" weren't what they used to be either with Robinson aging. It was just Tim Duncan being one of the greatest players of all time and the Nets having no answer for him. Timmy averaged 24/17/5 with 5 blocks and completely justified why he's a back-to-back MVP. Parker, Robinson and Jackson helped a bit on offense, but it was mostly the Duncan show. Tim held Kenyon to 14 points a game on 34% shooting, despite Kenyon averaging 20 a game on the regular during these playoffs'. With no one to step up and follow Kidd's lead on offense and no solution for Duncan on defense, the Spurs managed to win the title in 6 games.

The common theme I'm noticing is good coaching (Jeff Van Gundy, Larry Bird, Larry Brown and Byron Scott) and a good defense. Every single one of these teams, except for the Pacers, had a top 5 defense in the league. Also, all of these teams seemed to be really balanced. All of them were deep and had role players who knew their roles and were playing them well. They were all well organized, well coached teams, but when you come up against the generational talents like Shaq, Kobe and Duncan, there's really not that much you can do. Depth is most of the time beaten by sheer star power.
submitted by TheMagicMan56 to nbadiscussion [link] [comments]


2020.09.22 10:30 mediuqrepmes [OC] Comprehensive list of possible Chris Paul trades with every other team in the league

Here’s my overview of the universe of possible CP3 trades. I’ve gone through each team’s cap sheet and identified how a Chris Paul trade could be constructed. Wherever possible I’ve proposed one or more specific trades.
To trade for Chris Paul’s $41M salary for 2020-21, most teams will need to send at least $33M in outgoing salary to make the trade legal under the CBA’s salary matching rules. The exceptions are the handful of teams that have significant cap space.
I focused on what works cap-wise. For the most part I omitted specific draft picks. The list is comprehensive, so there are teams here for the sake of completeness that make no sense as CP3 trade partners. For every trade, Chris Paul is the only player OKC is sending out; including additional OKC players in the trade configurations would have made this writeup too long. Some players are so obviously unavailable (e.g., Doncic, Steph Curry, LeBron) that I omitted them from potential trade constructions.
Atlanta:
Boston:
Brooklyn:
Chicago:
Charlotte:
Cleveland:
Dallas:
Denver:
Detroit:
Golden State:
Houston:
Indiana:
Los Angeles Clippers:
Los Angeles Lakers:
Memphis:
Miami:
Milwaukee:
Minnesota:
New Orleans:
New York Knicks:
Orlando Magic:
Philadelphia:
Phoenix:
Portland:
Sacramento:
San Antonio:
Toronto:
Utah:
Washington:
All numbers are courtesy of Spotrac and Bballref.
submitted by mediuqrepmes to Thunder [link] [comments]


2020.09.01 22:57 zedd_gaskin1 Three Offseason Moves for Each Team

Undertaking a fairly large project here. The aim is to give each team a plausible trade, signing, and draft pick over the 2020 NBA offseason in order to boost each team's prospects in the upcoming 2020-2021 season. While I can't promise they all will be, I'll try and keep the trades as player-specific, rather than something like "Knicks trading up to draft Ball" or something like that.
I will also try (no promises) to do the trade in conjunction with one another. So it would ideally be proposed as 3-moves to make together, not 3 separate moves to make. Again, no promises, and I'll clarify if I'm suggest one as an alternative, but that will be the aim if I can find a pattern I like.
Also, some players listed in free agency signings do have player options, so we'll treat them all as possibilities to a certain degree. And also, just because your team's player is listed as a trade move for one team doesn't mean they are moving them, just that there either have been rumors they'd be available, or simply that the listed team would be interested in acquiring them.

Atlanta Hawks

Draft Pick: G/F Isaac Okoro, Auburn
With plenty of promising scorers, the Hawks should target Okoro to add to their defensive capacity on the wing. Okoro is a very selfless player, and would fit well into a lineup with Trae Young, John Collins and Clint Capela, amongst other promising young players. While ultimately, the Hawks may actually be best suited packaging this pick in a trade, if they stick at #6 overall, Okoro sure would be a good addition for Atlanta.
Signing: F JaMychal Green, Los Angeles Clippers
The Hawks have a few players who can fill minutes behind John Collins at the 4, such as De'Andre Hunter. But adding a clear backup for Collins would round the depth a bit cleaner. Insert JaMychal Green, a quality shooter (39% last season), who still be able to keep the post clear for Clint Capela, will giving Atlanta an excellent depth addition should he decline his player option in LAC and seek out a new opportunity.
Trade: G Victor Oladipo, Indiana Pacers
Oladipo would be interesting backcourt partner with Trae Young. In addition to being a high-caliber defender, Oladipo also has the ability to handle the ball when Young isn't on the court. While Indiana risks losing Oladipo down the road for nothing, shipping him off to the rising Hawks, who will be angling for a playoff run next season. Oladipo could be a big piece of that run, and perhaps even help them contend for more if returns to his All-Star form.

Boston Celtics

Draft Pick: F Patrick Williams, Florida State
The Celtics have one of the deepest rosters in the NBA, and selecting back at #13 overall means they'll really just be able to target the best player available. If Patrick Williams is available at 13 however, he should definitely be considered, as his versatility would help continue loading up the Celtics bench. And with Williams being a bit raw offensively, the Celtics can afford to take a chance on his upside and develop him under Brad Stevens further.
Signing: F Joe Harris, Brooklyn Nets
A 6'6 sharpshooter, Harris would be a fun add to the Celtics rotation. It may take some small moves to create the space for him, but adding the career 3-point marksman would fit in well with the versatile athletes around him like Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum, and help the second unit stretch the floor when he comes off the bench.
Trade: C Myles Turner, Indiana Pacers
Turner seems like he has been connected to the Celtics for a little while now, and it makes plenty of sense. The Pacers will likely be looking for players who fit better around Domantas Sabonis, and that could give an opportunity for the Celtics to move for Turner. Turner would fit well in the Celtics lineup at the center position, where right now the Celtics have some quality role players, but no star. By adding Turner, the Celtics would have one of the best all-around starting 5's in the entire league (Kemba-Smart-Brown-Tatum-Turner).

Brooklyn Nets

Draft Pick: G Josh Green, Arizona
Finding players who can work alongside Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant will be key, and Green's defense and off-ball ability make him well suited to this role. Picking #19 overall will make it difficult to add an instant impact rotation, but Green would have a good chance to find minutes with his skill set.
Signing: C Aron Baynes, Phoenix Suns
Should the Nets see themselves dishing out C Jarrett Allen in a blockbuster trade for a third star (see below), then a backup center becomes a big priority for the Nets. The solution here is Baynes, a hard-working center who had a career season shooting the ball. He'd fit nicely behind DeAndre Jordan.
Trade: G Bradley Beal, Washington Wizards
If Beal is available, the Nets should be keen to add him to the mix. Able to offer the most enticing players to any blockbuster package (Spencer Dinwiddie, Caris LeVert, Jarrett Allen), the Nets could find their third star to pair with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant when the two return next season. Adding Beal to the mix would immediately vault the Nets all the way to Finals contenders, if the return of Durant and Irving themselves don't already accomplish that.

Chicago Bulls

Draft Pick: PG LaMelo Ball, Australia
If he's on the board at the #4 overall pick, the Bulls should be keen on bringing LaMelo in to the Windy City. Perhaps the Draft's best playmaker, he could fit well with scoring guards like Coby White and Zach LaVine, while operating a dangerous pick and pop with big guys like Markkanen. With the size and athleticism to match up well defensively, LaMelo's playmaking ability would help turn the Bulls into a legitimate playoff threat in 2020-2021. If LaMelo is off the board, the Bulls could go in several direction, perhaps even trading the pick if they find a suitable offer.
Signing: C Meyers Leonard, Portland Trail Blazers
The Bulls could use some depth in the frontcourt, and Leonard's range and 3-point ability make him a great player to add into a rotation that ranked in the bottom third of the league in their percentage from deep, and could potentially lose F Otto Porter if he opts out, one of their better marksmen. The question will likely be centered on how much money Leonard is aiming for, but if the numbers work, Leonard should be a serious target for Chicago.
Trade: C Joel Embiid, Philadelphia 76ers
Embiid may or may not be available, there have been reports going both ways. But if the former Jayhawk is on the block after the 76ers quick exit from the playoffs, then Chicago should be very interested in acquiring him, even if means shipping out Wendell Carter and some other assets. With Markkanen capable of spacing the floor (34.5% shooter from deep), an Embiid addition would give Chicago two versatile bigs, given Embiid's proficiency from deep as well (34.8%). But most importantly, he'd be a scoring machine that would be the focal point of a fun, versatile Bulls roster that could push into playoff contention quickly with him leading the way.

Cleveland Cavaliers

Draft Pick: F Obi Toppin, Dayton
With it almost assured that neither LaMelo Ball nor Anthony Edwards reaches Cleveland at #5, their hope should be in Toppin making his way past the Hornets and Bulls. A dynamic forward who excels in multiple facets of the game, he'd represent the best player available at this point in the draft, and an ideal addition for a talent-needy Cavaliers team. Whether replacing Kevin Love, or playing alongside him in looks, Toppin should stay in Ohio if at all possible.
Signing: F Derrick Jones Jr., Miami Heat
The Heat need cap space for upcoming extensions, so it's likely that Jones Jr, a versatile role player, will hit free agency. Cleveland is already reportedly interested, and it makes sense why. Providing quality defense on the wing, he's 23 years old, which fits Cleveland's rebuilding timeline, and should have time to round out and improve his offensive game (8.5 ppg, 28% from 3). The name of the game for the Cavs is to acquire talent, and Jones Jr. provides them with an intriguing piece with room to grow.
Trade: Moving Kevin Love for Assets
After landing a dynamic replacement for him, the Cavaliers are a team that doesn't necessarily have a specific player to target, but rather figure out what they could get for someone like Love, who shot 37% from deep last year. His salary could be problematic here, but even adding second round selections has proven useful for Cleveland (Kevin Porter Jr.).

Dallas Mavericks

Draft Pick: G Tyrese Maxey, Kentucky
Maxey may not be a lethal shooter by any means, but his defense should make him a desired player for a Mavericks team that could use a defensive stopper to pair with Luka Doncic down the role. Maxey brings athleticism, ability to finish at the rim, and a decent mid-range game to the table, which should be enough, along with his defense, to make a desirable player for Mark Cuban's Mavericks.
Signing: SF Bogdan Bogdanovic, Sacramento Kings
Limited to what they can make happen with the Mid Level Exception or in a sign-and-trade, the Mavericks should get creative and add Bogdan Bogdanovic to the roster. The 27-year old wing would fit right at home with Luka Doncic and Kristaps Porzingis, a high caliber shooter, especially on catch and shoot situations. If Sacramento doesn't believe they can fit Bogdanovic in with upcoming deals for Fox and Bagley, along with Hield potentially, landing some assets in a sign-and-trade would make sense. If no sign-and-trade, perhaps a 3&D wing like James Ennis (Orlando) could be an easier fit financially.
Trade: PF Aaron Gordon, Orlando Magic
Whether Kristaps Porzingis fills more time at the four or the five, finding a way to pair him and Gordon together in a frontcourt would be fun to watch. Gordon's resurgence for the Magic this past season was a large reason they managed to make it into the playoffs. His defensive versatility and 3-point ability would make him an ideal third star to pair with Luka and Kristaps.

Denver Nuggets

Draft Pick: F Jaden McDaniels, Washington
The Nuggets were patient in bringing along Michael Porter Jr., who has stepped up big time during the Bubble. And with several Nuggets wings likely to depart in free agency (Millsap, Torrey Craig), adding a high potential piece like McDaniels to develop and even rotate in behind Grant and Porter Jr. would give Denver the opportunity to take a chance on someone like McDaniels.
Signing: C Thon Maker, Detroit Pistons
If Plumlee is in fact priced out of a return to Denver, finding a suitable replacement at center will be important. While Bol Bol could claim that spot, it's not a certainty, and thus, adding a three-level scorer at the 5 would be a wise insurance policy for the Nuggets.
Trade: G Jrue Holiday, New Orleans Pelicans
A high caliber veteran on a rebuilding roster, Holiday could be a great partner to pair with Jamal Murray in the backcourt. Less costly than someone like Bradley Beal, Holiday would be a much more realistic third star to bring in. A lineup with Holiday-Murray-Porter Jr.-Nokic and whoever else you want in that fifth spot seems deadly. With Gary Harris and plenty of other assets available, the Nuggets could offer an intriguing package for Holiday.

Detroit Pistons

Draft Pick: G/F Devin Vassell, Florida State
This may break from the mock drafts a bit, which usually have the Pistons adding a point guard. However, Vassell could be an interesting piece for Detroit to select, especially considering that the top point guard in the draft (LaMelo Ball) will not likely be available for Detroit at #7 overall. Instead, Detroit adds a long 3&D piece that could fit nicely in between Luke Kennard and Sekou Doumbouya long-term. And as for a point guard. . .
Signing: PG Fred VanVleet, Toronto Raptors
Reuniting Dwane Casey and VanVleet seems like an ideal pairing, especially the major need Detroit has at point guard. With Blake Griffin still a high caliber player when healthy, adding a win-now veteran like VanVleet could perhaps boost Detroit all the way to the playoffs next season if Griffin is playing. And at 26-years old, he's both an instant impact veteran as well as a possible long-term solution at the position.
Trade: C Mo Bamba, Orlando Magic
The Pistons may have found themself something with C Christian Wood, who emerged as a quality option for them in the wake of the Drummond trade. However, Wood's emergence was a very small sample size, raising some questions over how much stock Detroit would put into it. Acquiring Bamba would give them another starting caliber option, who has proven himself as a decent player off the bench behind Vucevic if Wood does manage to build on his promising play.

Golden State Warriors:

Draft Pick: C James Wiseman, Memphis (kinda)
Should the Warriors not move this pick, Wiseman makes more sense than LaMelo Ball in terms of fit and need. Though both have questions of maturity and consistency, Wiseman's size and length would offer the Warriors a weapon they haven't really had alongside Steph Curry and Klay Thompson. If Wiseman can fit in the frontcourt with forward Draymond Green, and Golden State makes the pick, it should be Wiseman.
Signing: PG D.J. Augustin, Orland Magic
At 32-years old, Augustin likely won't command more than any of the exceptions that Golden State would be able to muster up. However, he still can make an impact, running the Warriors second unit when Curry and Thompson (both returning from injury) need a breather. A quality shooter as well (35%), Augustin to the Warriors makes plenty of sense as they attempt to return to their place at the top of the Western Conference.
Trade: PF John Collins, Atlanta Hawks
While the Warriors seem to be another team interested in acquiring All-Star G Bradley Beal, perhaps a move for John Collins would be more feasible. The beauty for Golden State is that they would likely be able to orchestrate this trade more along the lines of a pick swap than an outright deal using their #2 selection. If the Hawks are interested in pairing Trae Young and perhaps LaMelo Ball or Anthony Edwards, this could the way to get there. Collins' 3-point shooting and athleticism would make him a quality fit in Golden State.

Houston Rockets

Draft Pick: - - - No Selection in Upcoming Draft - - -
The Rockets could always try buying a second round pick to add someone like C Nick Richards (Kentucky) or F Paul Eboua (Italy), but for now, they do not possess a pick.
Signing: C DeMarcus Cousins, Los Angeles Lakers
The Rockets have found success operating without a center, but should look to find a big man or two who fits alongside Russell Westbrook and James Harden. Cousins' season was derailed by injuries, but his ability to stretch the floor as well as battle big men like Davis or Jokic in the West make him an appealing option for the Rockets.
Trade: F/C Kevin Love, Cleveland Cavaliers
Likely dependent on whether or not they made the signing above, the Rockets could also choose to trade for a big man to help stretch the floor. A decorated veteran, Love has plenty of experience playing with ball-handling stars, and so long as he continues to shoot a good clip from deep and rebound the ball, he'd be an invaluable piece for Houston as they attempt to win a title.

Indiana Pacers

Draft Pick: F Killian Tillie, Gonzaga
The Pacers do not posses a first round pick this year, so finding a useful rotational piece at #44 overall will be the challenge here. For the Pacers, finding a clean backup for Sabonis would be a welcome add. Tillie is a floor-stretcher at the four, hitting over 40% from deep every season at Gonzaga. Mixing him into the second unit with Doug McDermott on the wing and Gaga Bitadze at center should give the Pacers the depth they need to make a run.
Signing: G/F Kent Bazemore, Sacramento Kings
Should the Pacers decide to move Victor Oladipo before he departs in 2021 free agency, then adding a wing like Bazemore should help fill in the depth after Jeremy Lamb steps into Oladipo's spot. Bazemore saw his 3-point percentage climb after moving to Sacramento (38%), and if he's able to continue hitting at a quality rate like that, he'd be a valuable two-way wing that would be helpful for a hopeful contender like the Pacers.
Trade: G Bradley Beal, Washington Wizards
The Pacers have several very intriguing pieces that they could potentially move, notably G Victor Oladipo and C Myles Turner. Should they move Oladipo, perhaps using him as the centerpiece to a Bradley Beal piece would give Indiana a shot at the player who would most likely elevate their team beyond first-round playoff exits. Swapping Oladipo for Beal should be discussed if the Wizards find themselves willing to move Beal.

Los Angeles Clippers

Draft Pick: F/C Kaleb Wesson, Ohio State
If JaMychal Green departs, finding another power forward would make sense for the Clippers to look for. Picking so late in the draft, #57 overall, limits their options in terms of finding an immediate contributor. Rather, targeting someone more developed like Wesson would be their best bet of finding a contributor, though they could easily opt for someone with more raw potential. Either way, Wesson's 3-point ability makes him an interesting option to develop into a rotational piece.
Signing: F/C Marvin Williams, Milwaukee Bucks
While the most likely signings for the Clippers will revolve around internal free agents, notably Marcus Morris and Montrezl Harrell, they still will have a bit of room for a smaller addition like Williams. If Harrell does depart, the Clippers could use another big to add to the rotation, and Marvin Williams would be a quality small ball center option for any teams looking to contend for a title, like the Clippers.
Trade: G J.J. Redick, New Orleans Pelicans
The Clippers have a very deep roster already, but Redick is exactly what you'd want to bring in to bolster your chances of winning it all. An elite, established marksmen, his shooting off the bench would be a big plus, and the defensive-minded Clippers already can compensate for him on that end of the floor. If they can make the money work, reuniting Redick and LAC would make sense as they chase a title.

Los Angeles Lakers

Draft Pick: G/F Desmond Bane, TCU
Picking at #28 overall, the Lakers would be wise to target Bane here, as his crazy 3-point rate (43%) would make him an energizing option off of the bench. The Lakers have a handful of wings as well on expiring deals, and should they lose someone like Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, bringing in Bane to boost their mediocre 3-point numbers could help LeBron win another title.
Signing: C Bismack Biyombo, Charlotte Hornets
The Lakers have had DeMarcus Cousins, JaVale McGee, and Dwight Howard all on the roster in 2019-2020. McGee has an option for 2021, so the Lakers could see some turnover at the center position if any of the aforementioned don't want to run it back with LeBron and AD. If they need a new center, Biyombo's defensive chops would make him a good fit as a backup or rotational center to help the Lakers win a title.
Trade: PG Derrick Rose, Detroit Pistons
Ensuring that the Lakers can generate offense with their stars getting a breather is crucial for any contender. Derrick Rose may no longer be the star he was, but he's still a valuable piece off the bench, and would fit quite well leading the Lakers second unit, should Rajon Rondo decline his player option.

Miami Heat

Draft Pick: C Jalen Smith, Maryland
The Heat have found tons of success with Bam Adebayo at the five, but for a team as deep as Miami, bringing in a high potential big man like Jalen Smith could give them a fun piece to develop. A quality three point shooter already, ironing out his defensive inconsistencies would give the Heat a quality contributor with the #20 overall pick.
Signing: F Dario Saric, Phoenix Suns
With Adebayo more of a playmaking Energizer Bunny, bringing in another big who can play alongside Adebayo, or relieve him, would be wise. The Heat will likely focus on bringing back players from their current roster, which would likely take them out of the running for Danilo Gallinari, for example. Instead, Saric could provide the same style of play at a more affordable cost. And that's important because....
Trade: Nothing Big...for now
Miami has a claim to one of the deepest rosters in the league. Their system works and they have the financial flexibility and assets to go big game hunting. With a poor free agency market this year though, the Heat should hold tight for another season and take a shot at a superstar like Giannis Antetokounmpo, and then pair him (or whoever) with one of the stacked free agents on the docket (Kawhi, LeBron, Beal, Gobert, Paul, etc). Adding DeMar DeRozan right now may be tempting, but don't do it, hold tight...for now.

Milwaukee Bucks

Draft Pick: PG Devon Dotson, Kansas
With multiple guards on expiring contracts, the Bucks should aim for a guard capable of providing them minutes in the Draft. An absolute blur, Dotson is one of the most physically impressive prospects in the Draft, though he'll need to work on deep range shooting before pairing up with Giannis. For now, he'd be a fun piece to add off the bench, able to push the ball in transition opportunities.
Signing: F Joe Harris, Brooklyn Nets
With a physical freak like Giannis leading the charge, surrounding him with shooters is the best course of action, and Harris shoots incredibly well. The Bucks may need to get create to afford Harris, but if they can make the money work, they likely won't find anyone as impactful as Harris in their pursuit of an NBA title.
Trade: F Nemanja Bjelica, Sacramento Kings
Bjelica had a quality season for the Kings, and while they'd likely want to hang onto him, the Bucks should consider making a call and working something. A 6'10 big with fantastic floor stretching ability (42% from 3), he'd represent a significant upgrade from the older Ersan Ilyasova. All about adding shooters, and even relative upgrades should be considered if the Bucks can afford it.

Minnesota Timberwolves

Draft Pick: SG Anthony Edwards, Georgia
This is a fairly easy one, as the Timberwolves hold the top pick and will have their choice of player here. The most likely, and most logical, is Edwards, who would pair with D'Angelo Russell in a high upside backcourt in Minnesota. While not an elite shooter, Edwards finds plenty of ways to score, and should continue to do so in the NBA, as Russell and Karl Anthony Towns take up the most attention from opponents.
Signing: F/C Montrezl Harrell, Los Angeles Clippers
The Timberwolves could give themselves a defensive boost by bringing in Harrell, the reigning Sixth Man of the Year. Whether playing the four or five, Harrell would give the Timberwolves a high intensity option that can play alongside Karl-Anthony Towns or relieving him when he's off the floor.
Trade: G/F Josh Richardson, Philadelphia 76ers
If the 76ers do enter a fire-sale, the Timberwolves should put in a call for two-way wing Josh Richardson. Still only 26-years old, Richardson has plenty of upside for a relatively young team like the Timberwolves. Adding him to the mix would give them another capable weapon around their stars.

New Orleans Pelicans

Draft Pick: F Aaron Nesmith, Vanderbilt
A 3-point marksman to fill in on the wings would be the exactly the type of player to put around a playmaker like Zion Williamson. Nesmith's large wingspan (6'10) would be an asset as he develops into a top two-way wing, and doing so in New Orleans would be an excellent move for the Pelicans to pursue with the #13 overall selection.
Signing: PG Austin Rivers, Houston Rockets
If the Pelicans look to accumulate assets by moving Lonzo Ball or Jrue Holiday, than bringing a quality shooting point guard makes a lot of sense. Rivers shot 36% on 4 attempts per game in Houston, and showed the ability to play with more ball-dominant players in Russell Westbrook and James Harden, which would suit him well in a lineup featuring Zion Williamson. And at 28 years old, Rivers still has plenty of good years left in him as the Pelicans work towards contending status.
Trade: Whatever Assets They Can Get From Redick or Holiday
The Pelicans don't bring a specific target to mind, but rather as a team who should aim to accumulate assets. Gathering picks or promising young players would position them well to make a move for a bigger superstar down the road, one who, paired with Zion Williamson, would propel them into championship contention. And with both Redick and Jrue Holiday in town, the Pelicans have some intriguing pieces to dangle for teams looking to win now.

New York Knicks

Draft Pick: PG Tyrese Haliburton, Iowa State
Unless the Knicks trade up to acquire PG LaMelo Ball (which they are reportedly looking at), the Knicks should feel comfortable picking the best guard on the board at #8 overall, as there are several quality options. Haliburton, however, is the ideal target here, as he's a high IQ player with a good 3-point shot and excellent defense, he would fit Thibodeau's style pretty well, and presents less of a risk than Cole Anthony or Killian Hayes for example.
Signing: F Danilo Gallinari, Oklahoma City Thunder
With Mitchell Robinson not a shooting threat in the slightest, the Knicks should target someone who can stretch the floor from the four position. The best name available there is OKC's Danilo Gallinari, who nearly went to the Heat, but now is a free agent. Whoever the Knicks end up with at point guard will be well-aided by the floor stretching capacity of Gallinari, a 40% shooter the past two seasons.
Trade: PG Chris Paul, Oklahoma City Thunder
Another name out of OKC, the Knicks should feel no issues drafting a point guard and trading for Chris Paul. First and foremost, the Knicks need to rebuild a winning culture, and bringing in Paul and Tom Thibodeau are good first steps towards that end. Likewise, even if the Knicks do select a point guard in the draft, Paul has shown himself quite adept at sharing the floor with other ball-handlers, like he did in Houston with James Harden, and as he did this past year in OKC with Shai-Gilgeous Alexander and Dennis Schroeder. A great leader, player and mentor, Paul would help the Knicks build the right environment to end their playoff drought.

Oklahoma City Thunder

Draft Pick: C Isaiah Stewart, Washington
If the Thunder move Chris Paul and Danilo Gallinari walks, they could be in for a rebuild. Stewart may be raw and underdeveloped offensively, but at 19-years old, he has time to develop his offensive game. Meanwhile, his wingspan, strength and motor give him major upside as a defensive stopper in the post. With Nerlens Noel potentially departing OKC, there could even be minutes for Stewart to step into as a rookie and get his feet wet.
Signing: F Otto Porter, Chicago Bulls
The Thunder could possibly be losing their best shooter (Gallinari) and their best defender (Roberson). Finding someone who can provide a little bit of both could work for them, with Porter shooting 38% last year in Chicago. An easy fit in between OKC's high powered guard duo and center Steven Adams, Porter could serve as either a reinforcement for another playoff run, or a piece with some long-term upside.
Trade: F Nemanja Bjelica, Sacramento Kings
If the Thunder aren't able to retain Danilo Gallinari, perhaps bringing in Bjelica could give them a similar styled replacement. As mentioned already, Bjelica is a floor stretching forward (42% clip) that would put another dangerous shooter around Chris Paul and Shai Gilgeous Alexander.

Orlando Magic

Draft Pick: G Theo Maledon, France
The Magic need someone to boost their struggling offense, and Maledon's craftiness as a ball-handler and off-ball shooting ability (37% from deep) should peak the Magic's interest. While Markelle Fultz has rebuilt himself into a potential long-term point guard, Maledon should seamlessly fit in next to him, and even provide minutes backing him up when Fultz heads to the bench.
Signing: G Wesley Matthews, Milwaukee Bucks
If Evan Fournier opts in, the Magic won't have the money to add bigger names, but Matthews would fit in well after finding a role as a rotational two-way guard. And even if the Magic do see Fournier depart elsewhere, Matthews' veteran experience could help their young core figure things out.
Trade: G/F Caris LeVert, Brooklyn Nets
If the Nets have interest in bringing in Aaron Gordon to add to the Irving-Durant duo, the Magic should be intent on getting Caris LeVert shipped to them as part of the deal. Only 26 years old, Levert averaged 19 points per game while fueling a KD-less Nets team to the playoffs. A young core of Fultz, Levert, Isaac, and Bamba is a group that you can build around.

Philadelphia 76ers

Draft Pick: G Cassius Stanley, Duke
The 76ers could use guards and shooting, and with limited financial flexibility, may need to find it in the NBA Draft. Thus, Stanley to Philly, where his elite athleticism and quality range (36%), would be a welcome addition to the 76ers. If he's still on the board at #21 overall, Stanley would make plenty of sense for the 76ers.
Signing: PG Goran Dragic, Miami Heat
The 76ers management has said they intend to keep Simmons and Embiid together, but if they don't keep that intention, bringing in Dragic to run the offense could be the move to make. Still productive for the Heat at 33-years old, Dragic would likely pair with Embiid better than Simmons did, as indicated by his shooting ability (37%).
Trade: PG Chris Paul, Oklahoma City Thunder
Breaking the mold here, should the 76ers decide to move Simmons, but not bring in Dragic, perhaps a bigger move would solve the question better. While the Knicks are the one most often linked to a move for Paul, the 76ers may want to consider adding the veteran PG to the mix, especially if they decide to breakup the Simmons-Embiid duo, and ship Ben Simmons out. Paul's veteran experience and versatile game should make him a much better sidekick for Embiid than Simmons managed to be.

Phoenix Suns

Draft Pick: PG Kira Lewis Jr., Alabama
The Suns needs someone in the backcourt, preferably someone who can work with Devin Booker, and run the offense when he's off the floor. That someone could be Lewis Jr., who averaged 19 points per game at Alabama and was able to knock down over 36% of his threes over two seasons. Finding a quality playmaker to carry the load could give them the breakthrough they need.
Sigining: F Moe Harkless, Los Angeles Clippers
Current starting wing Mikal Bridges was a solid compliment to Booker and Ayton this past season, but adding some more depth, especially a defensive geared piece, would give the Suns some switchy wings who can help them slow opponents down in the playoffs next year. Harkless will be a fairly cheap way of doing so.
Trade: F Lauri Markkanen, Chicago Bulls
Putting Markkanen in an offense led by Devin Booker and DeAndre Ayton could give him the space he needs to regain some of the production he had earlier in Chicago. Able to shoot off the pick-and-pop, Markkanen won't need to crowd in on Ayton to be an effective piece to the Suns offense.

Portland Trail Blazers

Draft Pick: F Saddiq Bey, Villanova
With two picks in the first round (16 and 29), the Blazers will have the flexibility to fill multiple needs with the most talented players on the board. For that first selection, Bey would be a quality addition, giving the Blazers wing defense and reliable shooting. A second team unit featuring Trent, Little and Bey would be very versatile. Then, with that second first rounder, targeting a big man like Jalen Smith would be a quality Draft for the Blazers.
Signing: C Mason Plumlee, Denver Nuggets
With Hassan Whiteside hitting free agency, it's likely the Blazers could find themselves in need of a backup center if Whiteside is unwilling to accept a role as a backup. Thus, Mason Plumlee could be an option, as a veteran big with a quality motor who has been a serviceable option for Denver. Plumlee may not fill up the stat sheet, but in Game 6 of the Playoffs, made a direct impact for Denver with a handful of offensive rebounds and high energy. That kind of team player who work well for the Blazers rotation.
Trade: PG Patty Mills, San Antonio Spurs.
The Blazers have a quality starting lineup with Lillard-McCollum-Ariza-Collins/Melo-Nurkic. What they still could use is a backup point guard to help generate some points when Lillard takes a breather. Perhaps swinging a deal to bring in Patty Mills to an actual contender would be a good match. Mills currently backups Dejounte Murray in San Antonio, but his quality production and veteran leadership could be a boost for the Blazers.

Sacramento Kings

Draft Pick: G/F Devin Vassell, Florida State
With De'Aaron Fox running the point, the Kings need to surround him with shooters like Vassell. A 6'10 wingspan and 42% clip from deep, Vassell would be an ideal fit on the wing, and could help the Kings make the push into the playoffs by bolstering their offense and defense.
Signing: F Jerami Grant, Denver Nuggets
If Grant opts out of his deal in Denver, he'd give the Kings a two-way option at the 3 or 4, an excellent depth addition to add in rotation with Jabari Parker, Bjelica, and Harrison Barnes. And of course, important to note when playing with De'Aaron Fox, Grant has a quality shot from deep, hitting 39% for the Nuggets this season.
Trade: F Kyle Kuzma, Los Angeles Lakers
If the Kings are moving G Buddy Hield, then perhaps he could interest the Lakers, who would likely want to acquire a more high profile guard to compliment LeBron and Davis. Thus, a move for Kuzma could be in play, as he'd give the Kings a versatile wing to pair with Harrison Barnes. Kuzma would also compromise a promising young trio along with De'Aaron Fox and Marvin Bagley III.

San Antonio Spurs

Draft Pick: F Deni Avdija, Israel
If there's any team that should be angling to move up should Avdija slide, the Spurs would likely be one of them. An excellent distributing big wing, capable of giving the Spurs minutes at the 4, Avdija seems like a tailor made fit for a Gregg Popovich offensive system. Between his schematic fit and his upside, he'd be the ideal player for the Spurs to come away with on Draft day.
Signing: F/C Bobby Portis, New York Knicks
Portis has plenty of upside if he can get straightened out, and if anyone is going to get the most out of Portis and teach him to play in a system, it's Gregg Popovich. If he succeeds, the Spurs find themselves with an offensive forward who can score in multiple ways, or even another trade piece if they want to sell high. Either way, taking a gamble on Portis could pay off for a program needing a new direction.
Trade: As Many Picks as They Can Get
The Spurs run is over for now. They did well to bring in some fun pieces in the Kawhi trade, but the Spurs need to enter a rebuild or risk an extended play in no man's land. Selling on DeMar DeRozan, LaMarcus Aldridge, Rudy Gay, Patrick Mills, and Marco Belinelli should be the aim. Get picks, get promising young players, and set yourself up to rebuild quickly. If one of these guys can even help you move up and select Avdija, do it.

Toronto Raptors

Draft Pick: F Robert Woodard II, Mississippi State
An athletic forward with a good build, Woodard could be a steal if Toronto is able to land him at #29 overall. After taking a major leap in between his freshman year and sophomore year, Woodard developed an outside shot (43%). For a team that may not be able to retain Serge Ibaka, finding another big to provide some range on the outside would give them a quality replacement.
Signing: PG Austin Rivers, Houston Rockets
Should Toronto be unable to retain Fred VanVleet, finding a guard capable of picking up minutes at point guard and shooting guard would serve them well. Rivers may not the same caliber of VanVleet, but can provide the versatility needed, along with a quality enough shot from deep (36% in 2019-2020).
Trade: SG Luke Kennard, Detroit Pistons
Thinking outside the box here, if the Raptors aren't comfortable paying VanVleet the rate it'd take to retain him, perhaps a sign-and-trade for a team like Detroit could send them back something useful, rather than letting VanVleet walk entirely. A sharp shooting guard (40% over his career, Kennard could fit well in Toronto, either as a long-term solution, or a piece to flip as part of a package at the deadline for a bigger star post-Kawhi.

Utah Jazz

Draft Pick: C Aleksej Pokusevski, Serbia
A unicorn big-man, Pokusevski is a mobile center with fantastic height (7'0) and the ability to knock down shots beyond the arc (32% shooter). While he'll need to get bigger (only 205 lbs and lanky), he's still very young and should be able to develop into a starting caliber player down the road. And selecting at #23 overall, that's really what you're looking for.
Signing: G Langston Galloway, Detroit Pistons
While the main signing priorities for Utah will be re-signing Jordan Clarkson and extending Donovan Mitchell, the Jazz could also look to add another guard into the rotation, and Galloway's versatility and shooting make him an easy player to fit into any rotation.
Trade: PG Dennis Smith Jr., New York Knicks
The Jazz would have some quality offers if they did move C Rudy Gobert. But assuming they keep Gobert, the Jazz target someone to give their second unit a boost, especially as an aging Mike Conley drops off from the All-Star player he was. Smith looked much better earlier in his career, averaging around 15 points per game through his first three seasons. If he can recapture that, he could even play his way into the direct replacement for Conley.

Washington Wizards

Draft Pick: F Isaac Okoro, Auburn
This one makes more sense than a lot of these other picks, in my opinion. The Wizards are horrendous on the defensive end, and Okoro is the best wing defender in this year's Draft. Being able to lock up opposing team's top scorer will allow Beal and Wall to go to work on the offensive end, lightening their load a good deal.
Signing: F Moe Harkless, Los Angeles Clippers
Bringing in one defensive minded rookie won't solve the defensive woes of the Wizards. With not a ton of cap flexibility, the Wizards should aim for someone relatively cheap, who can fill a clear role, and help develop young players like Rui Hachimura. That someone would likely be Moe Harkless.
Trade: The Biggest Haul They Can Get for Beal
I know the Wizards have said they want to see what Beal and Wall can do next season, rather than moving Beal now. But I personally think that's a mistake, and that cashing in on Beal, and getting a jump start on the rebuild is the way to go. The Wall-Beal duo didn't accomplish anything before Wall tore his Achilles, and the longer they wait, the more likely they get screwed over. If they can land two of Caris LeVert, Spencer Dinwiddie, or Jarrett Allen from the Nets, I think that would be the best package, but the aim is less so a specific target than just hoard what they can get.


Anyways, this took a little while to put together, so I hope you don't totally hate it. Let me know if you agree, disagree, think someone would fit better!
submitted by zedd_gaskin1 to nba [link] [comments]


2020.08.18 00:53 Jonnyawesome89 Offseason Review Series: Baltimore Ravens

Coming off an incredible 14-2 regular season in which the Ravens, led by MVP Lamar Jackson, shocked the league with an innovative offense that ran all over opponents, the team looks toward a 2020 campaign in which they will attempt to shake the sting to an extremely disappointing first round playoff exit.
[Baltimore Ravens]
Division: AFC North
Coaching Changes
In a season rocked by uncertainty due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Ravens have a significant advantage in the fact that they retain both coordinators and head coach after a successful season. In February, head coach John Harbaugh announced title changes for 6 members of the staff (per baltimoreravens.com):
· Chris Horton – special teams coordinator (formerly special teams coach)
· Randy Brown – special teams coach (formerly assistant special teams coach)
· Chris Hewitt – pass defense coordinator (formerly defensive backs coach)
· Sterling Lucas – defensive assistant/defensive line (formerly defensive assistant/linebackers)
· Jesse Minter – defensive backs coach (formerly assistant defensive backs coach)
· Drew Wilkins – outside linebackers coach (formerly assistant defensive line and outside linebackers coach)
Chris Horton
Horton enters his second year guiding the Ravens' special teams unit after taking over for longtime coordinator Jerry Rosburg following his retirement in 2019. Last season, Pro Bowl and first-team All-Pro K Justin Tucker finished second in the NFL with a 96.6 percent field goal success rate (28 of 29), which was also the second-best mark in franchise single-season history. Baltimore also finished eighth in punt return average (8.2) in 2019. A seventh-year coach with the Ravens, Horton has been working with the special teams group since 2015.
Randy Brown
Brown is in his 13th year working with the Ravens' specialists. He has had an instrumental role in the development of the team's kicking game by helping Tucker become the most accurate kicker of all time (90.8 percent). Tucker has scored 141 points in each of his past four seasons, which tie for the Ravens single-season scoring record and make him the NFL's only kicker to surpass the 140 mark in each of the last four years (2016-19).
Chris Hewitt
Hewitt enters his ninth-year coaching with the Ravens after serving as the team's defensive backs coach for the past five seasons (2015-19). Last season, Baltimore's pass defense finished sixth in the NFL (207.2 ypg) with three players from the secondary earning Pro Bowl honors (CB Marlon Humphrey, CB Marcus Peters and S Earl Thomas III). Humphrey and Peters also earned first-team All-Pro accolades. Baltimore tallied a 77.5 defensive passer rating in 2019, which stood as the NFL's second-best mark.
Sterling Lucas
Lucas is in his fifth season with the Ravens after joining the team in 2016 as a strength and conditioning assistant in 2016. He has also served as an administrative assistant – defense (2017), quality control – defense (2018) and most recently as defensive assistant/linebackers (2019). Prior to joining Baltimore, Lucas spent two years as a defensive graduate assistant at North Carolina State.
Jesse Minter
Minter has been with the Ravens since 2017, when he started as a defensive assistant. He was promoted to assistant defensive backs coach in 2019, when he worked under Hewitt. This past season, Baltimore tied (Tampa Bay) for the NFL lead with six defensive touchdowns (including three interceptions returned for touchdowns).
Drew Wilkins
Wilkins enters his 11th year with the Ravens after initially joining the team as a football video operations intern in 2010. He served as the team's assistant defensive line & outside linebackers coach the past two seasons (2018-19). Wilkins originally moved to the coaching side in 2013, when he became a coaching staff assistant. He was promoted to defensive assistant in 2014 before becoming the assistant defensive line coach in 2017. In 2019, OLB Matthew Judon led the Ravens with a career-high 9.5 sacks and four forced fumbles. The Ravens also finished with 111 quarterback hits, the NFL's third-most.
Free Agency:
Players Lost/Cut
Player Position New Team
Tony Jefferson SS Released
James Hurst OT Released
Michael Pierce DT FA, Minnesota
Josh Bynes ILB FA, Cincinatti
Patrick Onwuasor ILB FA, NY Jets
Seth Roberts WR FA, Carolina
Hayden Hurst TE Traded, Atlanta
Chris Wormley DE Traded, Pittsburgh
De’Anthony Thomas WKR Opt-Out
Andre Smith OT Opt-Out
In an offseason with a few notable departures for the Ravens, none is more impactful than the retirement of OG Marshal Yanda. A 13-year veteran, Yanda anchored the Ravens offensive line, and was consistently amongst the best guards in football. Not just a dominant force on the field, Yanda brought veteran leadership to a young Ravens squad that found a lot of success in the regular season. Now retired, he becomes a prospect for the NFL Hall of Fame. Marshal Yanda is a caliber of player that is not easily replaced, and the loss of his ability and leadership is one of the biggest question marks for the Ravens offense going into 2020.
Michael Pierce came into the league as an UDFA who was able to become an immediate contributor for the Ravens front 7. An imposing figure at over 330 lbs., Pierce, along with Ravens stalwart Brandon Williams created a stout, if not agile, front for the Ravens defense. Following a 2019 in which Pierce came into camp overweight and out of shape, his long-term future with the team was immediately brought into question, culminating with him signing with the Minnesota Vikings this offseason. The additions by the Ravens of Calais Campbell and Derek Wolfe this offseason softens the blow considerably, and the unit may even look to be improved headed into this year.
When it comes to Baltimore Ravens and Greg Roman offenses, extensive use of Tight Ends immediately comes to mind. It was therefore surprising to some when the Ravens decided to trade former first round pick Hayden Hurst to the Falcons this offseason. Hurst played significant snaps for the Ravens in a system that heavily utilizes tight ends. Unfortunately for Hurst, he was injured his rookie season and struggled for targets behind Mark Andrews, who has made a case to be considered a top TE in the league. Ultimately, this may be a rare win-win trade, as Hurst will have an opportunity to flourish with Matt Ryan on a Falcons team who recently lost Austin Hooper, while the Ravens were thrilled to use the resulting pick on standout RB JK Dobbins, who fits their system perfectly.
While neither player was a force in the back field last season, the simultaneous losses of Josh Bynes and Patrick Onwuasor presents an interesting challenge for the Ravens, who are now likely to feature two rookies (Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison) heavily in their rotation this year.
The inclusion of opt-outs due to Covid-19 made this offseason tricky for some teams, but the Ravens were relatively unscathed. While the loss of De’Anthony Thomas and Andre Smith does impact depth, ultimately both players were replacement level, and their loss does not represent a significant challenge for 2020.
Players Acquired

Player Position Old Team Length Salary
Matthew Judon DE Ravens Franchise Tag $16.3MM
Derek Wolfe DE Broncos 1 Year $3MM
Jihad Ward DE Ravens 1 Year $1.1MM
Jimmy Smith CB Ravens 1 Year $3.5MM
Anthony Levine Sr S Ravens 1 Year $1.81MM
Chris Moore WR Ravens 1 Year $1.7MM
Sam Koch P Ravens 2 Years $4.95MM
Matt Skura C Ravens 1 Year RFA Tender
Chuck Clark SS Ravens 3 Years $15.3MM
Jordan Richards S Ravens 1 Year $845k
Gus Edwards RB Ravens 1 Year $750K
Nick Moore LS Ravens 1 Year $610K
Calais Campbell DE Jaguars 2 Years $25MM
DJ Fluker OG Seahawks 1 Year $1.07MM
Pernell McPhee DE Ravens 1 Year $1.1MM
While the Ravens did not make a ton of moves on outside players, they did make a big splash early in the offseason with the acquisition of Calais Campbell. At the low cost of just a 5th round pick, the Ravens were able to acquire a perennial pro bowler and veteran leader. A no brainer for the cost, by making this move, along with the signing of Derek Wolfe, the Ravens were able to address their D Line, a unit that was exposed last year by both Nick Chubb and Derek Henry. On the offensive line, the Ravens were able to add DJ Fluker, who can immediately slot into the void left by Marshal Yanda. While Fluker will certainly be a drop off from the Hall of Fame prospect Yanda, his veteran presence should help minimize the impact of losing such an important player.
On the re-signing front, the name of the game was continuity. The Ravens were able to accomplish this goal, returning key pieces of the 2019 squad. Most notably, the Ravens were able to keep intact what was one of the best secondaries in the NFL last year down the stretch. By re-signing Chuck Clark, Anthony Levine, Jimmy Smith and extending Marcus Peters (with already signed players Marlon Humphrey and Earl Thomas) the Ravens are once again slated to have one of the best secondaries in the NFL. This is key, as the Ravens clock chewing, points scoring offense often forces enemy teams to play from behind, and the Ravens defense is once again set up to make passing the ball extremely difficult. At the DE position the Ravens tagged Matthew Judon. A productive player with a high amount of pressures in 2019, Judon was important to retain on an extremely thin DE unit. On offense, they returned RB Gus Edwards and starting C Matt Skura. Skura is an important piece, as his loss was keenly felt against the Titans following his season ending injury in the Rams game.
Draft
The Ravens are known across the NFL for accumulating picks through trades and compensatory selections. This year was no exception, as the Ravens had 10 total selections, including a whopping 6 picks in the first three rounds.

Round Pick (OVR) Player Position School
1 28 (28) Patrick Queen LB LSU
2 23 (55) JK Dobbins RB Ohio State
3 7 (71) Justin Madubuike DT Texas A&M
3 28 (92) Devin Duvernay WR Texas
3 34 (98) Malik Harrison LB Ohio State
3 42 (106) Tyre Phillips OT Miss State
4 37 (143) Ben Bredeson G Michigan
5 25 (170) Broderick Washington DT Texas Tech
6 22 (201) James Proche WR SMU
7 5 (219) Geno Stone S Iowa

Draft Grades:
Round 1:
Patrick Queen: A+
One of the most notable weaknesses of the Ravens Defense in 2019 was the linebacking corps. After losing CJ Mosley the previous offseason, the remaining LBs proved unequal to the task, culminating in a complete reshuffling of the position with off the street free agents a few weeks into the season. While the new group was serviceable, the Ravens had a noticeably porous run defense when playing from behind, which was not an issue for much of the year but got completely exposed in an embarrassing round 1 playoff exit. This made LB a huge position of need. The Ravens, true to their reputation, remained patient in the first round while other teams linked to first round LB talent, (teams like Green Bay and New Orleans) went elsewhere, and other teams made reaches, (notably the Seahawks one pick earlier) and still got their guy, much later than originally projected. Queen is an exciting addition to the Ravens Defense. Fast and with great instincts, Queen has a knack for always being around the play. He shows up in the biggest moments, snagging a key interception from Tua Tagovailoa against Alabama and earning Defensive MVP honors in the national championship game. Queen does have some weaknesses, with weak tackling at times and only one year of proven production. However, given the Ravens’ ability to develop linebackers, they must have been ecstatic to snag a player who many analysists believed would be long gone by pick 28.
Round 2:
JK Dobbins: A-
The Ravens had perhaps the most dominant rushing attack of the modern era in 2019, which caused many to be shocked when they selected a running back with their second pick of the NFL Draft. However, anyone who is a close observer of the Ravens understood the selection. The Ravens live by the mantra of “Best Player Available” and as an organization refuse to reach for positions of need. This has made them one of the more successful organizations in the draft, as they consistently find value with their picks. Dobbins is a perfect fit for the Ravens system. He is a shifty back with great vision who demonstrated great understanding of how to take what the defense gives him. This projects very well into an offense that opens so many holes with a dominant line and constant running threat of MVP Lamar Jackson. Dobbins should be an immediate contributor and projects as the long-term starter, particularly if the Ravens part ways with Mark Ingram after this year. He is the second All-Time rusher at Ohio State, ahead of players like Ezekiel Elliott and Eddie George. His ability to run out of the pistol makes him a great complement to Lamar Jackson in RPO situations.
Rounds 3:
Justin Madubuke: A
Every year the Ravens seem to have a pick in the mid rounds that dumbfounds analysts. This is because they have a knack for scooping up players that should not still be on the board without giving up capital to do so. In this example, the Ravens traded back from pick 60, and likely still got the player they were targeting. Madubuike is a mountain at 6’3, 293 pounds, and has shown success at not only containing the run but pressuring the QB. Madubuike provides an infusion of youth to a defensive line that is one of the older units on the team. This pick is also indicative of the Ravens commitment to returning to their run stuffing roots, the front office was clearly unhappy with the pain inflicted by Derek Henry in the divisional round.
Devin Duvernay: B+
Coming into 2020, the Ravens WRS are the biggest question mark on the roster. An extremely inexperienced unit, many thought that it was a position that would be addressed much earlier in the draft. However, the Ravens were patient, and snagged the guy they wanted in Devin Duvernay. Duvernay had extremely successful 2019, racking up 1,386 yards and showcasing very reliable hands. The speedy, sure-handed nature of Duvernay’s game is a definite complement to Lamar Jacksons playstyle, as the Ravens rely on efficiency over volume in the passing game. One consideration with Duvernay moving forward is that he is most effective from the slot, which is rather crowded with the Ravens current lineup of pass catchers.
Malik Harrison: A-
As with Patrick Queen, the Ravens were clearly motivated to overhaul a weak line backing unit that was picked on at times in 2019. Harrison, a large, run thumping LB, projects as a great complement to the speedy, instinctual Queen. The Ravens were clearly motivated to fix their run stopping issues. Harrison is a large presence who is extremely reliable in maintaining his gap assignments, which should go a long way in shoring up the Ravens run D.
Tyre Phillips: B-
With the last pick of the third round, an exhausted Roger Goodell announced the pick of Tyre Phillips. Phillips, a 6 ft 5, 345 pound OT, is likely to be involved in the Ravens competition at guard to replace Marshal Yanda. Phillips shows great size and natural athleticism, with some roughness to his technique. While he was drafted earlier than predicted, Phillips will have the chance to grow in the Ravens’ system and compete for a starting role.
Round 4:
Ben Bredeson: A-
An All Big Ten player under head coach John Harbaugh’s brother Jim at Michigan, Ben Bredeson seemed destined to stay in the Harbaugh family. A great complement to the previous pick of Phillips, Bredeson projects as more pro ready on day one. There are concerns about his natural length at the pro level, however, with his technique, Bredeson should be in the mix early on. Adding a second offensive line here was a great move by the Ravens to help shore up their interior O line.
Round 5:
Broderick Washington: C
The Ravens addressed defensive line again in round 5, in a move that was a head scratcher to some. The Ravens like Washington as a player and as a leader, and so did not hesitate to grab him. While this does seem like somewhat of a luxury pick, Washington will get the chance to learn from great players like Calais Campbell and Derek Wolfe. Washington doesn’t need to feel pressured to contribute year one. This pick once again demonstrates the Ravens commitment to “Best player Available”.
Round 6:
James Proche: B+
In a surprise move, the Ravens traded back in to acquire James Proche. A player who analysts like Mel Kiper thought would go much higher, the Ravens get to add another prospect to their stable of young WRs. Proche is a speedy, productive, sure-handed WR that seems to be the favorite of QB Lamar Jackson. With the opting out of De’Anthony Thomas, Proche’s most likely route to the field in year one will be as a kick returner.
Round 7:
Geno Stone: B
With their 10th and final selection of the draft, the Ravens snagged S Geno Stone. An intelligent, cagey safety at Iowa, Stone fell to the seventh round due to concerns around his athleticism. He will have to prove himself to make a stacked roster. However, he does project as a special teams contributor with some long term potential upside in a safety group that lacks depth.
Overall A: In a draft with many picks, the Ravens acquired a lot of good players with immediate contribution potential. They were able to make a good team better without making drastic moves or giving up significant capital. The Ravens FO are masters at letting the draft come to them, and once again they had a consensus great draft that was lauded by analysts.
Other Offseason News that Affected the Team
The Ravens avoided major drama in the offseason. There were, however, a few stories of note in the media.
Earl Thomas Incident: Earl Thomas was in the news following an altercation with his wife in which she allegedly pointed a gun at his head. Thomas’ wife Nina reportedly tracked Earl and his brother to a rental house, were they were shacked up with women. The Ravens were reported to be very displeased with Thomas, who did not alert the team to the story ahead of time. One point that is important to note, that while the entire incident was very strange, Earl was not in the same room as his brother as was being speculated on the internet. Both brothers were in different rooms with their respective partners.
Lamar Jackson: After a breakout MVP season, Lamar has become a veritable superstar, notably gracing the cover of Madden.
Antonio Brown: After being filmed working out with quarterback Lamar Jackson and his cousin, WR Hollywood Brown, Antonio Brown has been repeatedly linked with the Ravens. Jackson has gone as far as to publicly advocate for signing the wayward receiver. However, given that Brown will be suspended for half of the season, and Owner Steve Bischotti has publicly eschewed the idea of signing players with domestic violence issues following the Ray Rice incident, a pairing of Antonio Brown and Jackson seems unlikely.
Hollywood Brown: While not a national story, one thing that Ravens fans are excited about is the offseason progress of Hollywood Brown. After having a screw surgically removed from his foot, Brown has been posting his workouts and has reportedly gained 23 pounds from last year.
Mo Gaba: A heart breaking story this offseason, the passing of Ravens superfan Mo Gaba was announced on July 28th. A dedicated fan of Baltimore sports, Mo passed at age 14 after multiple battles with cancer. He was heavily involved with the Ravens organization, notably announcing the Ravens selection of Ben Powers as the first ever draft pick announced via braille in 2019. He was known as a ray of light by many Ravens players, and always had a sunny and cheery disposition despite the struggles he faced. This post is dedicated to his life, and Mo is beloved across Ravens nation.
Latest Injury and FA News:
Iman Marshal: Torn ACL, out for the year.
Chris Moore: Broken finger, out for a few weeks.
Dez Bryant: The FA WR, has reportedly garnered interest from the Ravens front office and is traveling to Baltimore for a workout.
Projected Starting Lineup:
· QB: Lamar Jackson:
Following an incredible MVP season, expectations are heaped high on QB Lamar Jackson. Jackson amazed with his running ability, making elite athletes routinely look foolish with his juking ability and speed. He was also incredibly efficient in the passing game, leveraging his running threat to keep defenses spread thin. Lamar is expected to continue his dominance this year, as his unique skillset is incredibly difficult to plan for. Jackson has his sights set on the post season, as his 0-2 playoff record is one black mark on an otherwise incredible start to his career.
· RB: Mark Ingram:
Ingram proved to be a force in 2019 as a complement to Lamar, as he chewed up defenses frozen by Jacksons rushing ability for YAC and first downs on a routine basis. As with last year the Ravens will address running back with a committee, expect to see Gus Edwards and new addition JK Dobbins feature heavily in the offense.
· FB: Patrick Ricard:
One of the NFLS few remaining two-way players, Ricard is an 800-pound gorilla whose lead blocking ability sets the tone of the Ravens hardnosed rushing offense.
· TE: Mark Andrews, Nick Boyle:
A dynamic duo, Andrews and Boyle will have more responsibility following the offseason departure of Hayden Hurst. Boyle has proven himself as one of the most effective blockers at the tight end position in the NFL, and he acts almost like another linemen, mauling defense fronts and empowering the run game. Andrews has emerged as one of the premier TE receiving threats in the NFL, and will have the opportunity this year to take the leap needed to reach the tier of players like George Kittle, Travis Kelsey, and Zach Ertz.
· WR: Hollywood Brown, Willie Snead, Miles Boykin:
In an offense that does not heavily feature WR play, the Ravens young corps will need to step up to get the Ravens over the hump in the playoffs. Brown and Boykin will need to take a leap in their second years to solidify the group. Brown faces the weight of expectation as many believe he has the potential to become the 1,000-yard WR threat the Ravens have lacked for most of their franchises’ history.
· LT: Ronnie Stanley:
The best LT in the NFL, Stanley imposes his will on defenders and anchors an offensive line that was dominant in 2019. Stanley’s play last year earned him all pro honors and the biggest question around him is how expensive he will become following the block buster extension signed by Laremy Tunsil this offseason,
· LG: Bradley Boseman:
An average to above average starter at left guard, Bozeman did a good job in 2019. While he will face competition for his spot from players like Ben Powers and Ben Bredeson, he projects to start again in 2020.
· C: Matt Skura: The starting center who was lost mid-season due to injury, Skura’s return is of keen importance to the Ravens. Skura’s back up, Patrick Mekari, did a great job filling in, but was ultimately exposed in the Titan’s game, contributing to the Ravens offensive woes in that matchup.
· RG: DJ Fluker: A road grader in the run game who is average to below average in the passing game, Fluker’s skillset fits what the Ravens are trying to accomplish. While there will be a competition for this spot, the ability to plug in a veteran like Fluker over a first- or second-year player makes him the likely candidate to replace Ravens great Marshal Yanda.
· RT: Orlando Brown Jr.:
A gigantic human being who followed in his father’s footsteps, Brown along with Stanley formed one of the best young tackle duos in the NFL. Brown Jr. was extremely solid in 2019 and should only get better going into this year.
· DL: Derek Wolfe, Calais Campbell, Brandon Williams, Jaylon Ferguson:
A group ultimately marked by its failure to stop the run in 2019, the Ravens completely overhauled their starting lineup. The addition of Campbell and Wolfe to a unit that returns Brandon Williams to his natural position of NT should see significant improvement heading into this year.
· LB: Matthew Judon, Patrick Queen, LJ Fort:
A unit that was so weak last year that the Ravens were signing players off the street to start, the LB corps has a lot to live up to in 2020. One of the team’s larger question marks, the LB corps’ effectiveness will ultimately hinge on what level of contribution it can get from rookies Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison.
· CB: Marlon Humphrey, Tavon Young, Marcus Peters:
Featuring one of the best CB duos in the league in Peters and Humphrey, the Ravens CBs will somehow be even better with the return of slot corner Tavon Young from injury. This CB group will be focused on being the best unit in the league, and there is no reason why they should not accomplish that goal.
· S: Chuck Clark, Earl Thomas:
The Ravens Safety group struggled last year until the injury of Tony Jefferson, and over the season anchored a very effective secondary. There were questions at times about Thomas’ hustle, but he will undoubtedly contribute heavily. Clark played well enough to earn a large extension, and his intelligence will feature heavily in the complicated Martindale system.
· K: Justin Tucker:
Not much to say about this one, Justin Tucker is just better than every other kicker in the league. He is extremely clutch and an absolute weapon on game winning drives, oh and he sings opera too.
· P: Sam Koch:
A player who reinvented the way his position is played, Sam Koch rejoins the wolf pack for another season with a fresh leg, after barely having to punt last year. Not a bad gig.
· KR: Justice Hill:
In a crowded RB room, KR may be the best way for the speedy Hill to see the field consistently next year.
· PR: James Proche:
A shifty and speedy talent with extremely sure hands, Proche will compete immediately for the PR spot, and should see time there in 2020.
Position Group Strengths and Weaknesses
Position groups:
· QB: The Ravens are very strong at the QB position. With the League MVP in Lamar Jackson, and an above average back up in RGIII, the team should feel extremely confident about its QB room.
· Backfield: The Ravens have one of the strongest RB Corps in the league, and all 4 RBS should contribute in many ways in the Ravens unique offense.
· OL: One of the strongest units in 2019, the OL should take a step back with the loss of Marshal Yanda. How the unit adjusts to this change will be one of the most important questions for the team to answer this year,
· Pass Catchers: Efficiency is the name of the game for the Ravens passing game and that will be the story in 2020. While there are many teams in the league with more productive TE and WR rooms, the Ravens offensive scheme should allow players like Hollywood Brown and Mark Andrews to be big contributors.
· DL: The DL must do its part in washing the stain of Derek Henry’s play off performance from the Raven’s memory. This unit appears to be much improved and should be poised to do so under the leadership of Calais Campbell.
· LB: This unit is a huge question mark and we will not know how good they are until we can see the impact of the rookies firsthand. If Patrick Queen and Harrison are ready to contribute right away, it should be a solid group.
· Secondary: The Ravens have across the board the most complete secondary in the league, bar none. This unit was extremely strong last year and should remain so in 2020.
· Special Teams: Special Teams has traditionally been a strength for the Ravens. The kicking and punting units should continue to be top of the league, while there are some questions on how the KR and PR teams will perform this year.
Schedule Prediction
Week 1: Browns
Prediction: Win
The Browns have a talented roster and could be a huge threat if they can pull things together in 2020. However, installing a new HC with the limitations of covid places the Ravens as the week one favorites.
Week 2: @ Texans
Prediction: Win
Houston is hard to predict given the instability of the O’Brien regime. However, a Texans team that got trounced by the Ravens last year and lost their star WR will have a hard time overcoming an improved Ravens. The score will likely be closer, but the Ravens should pull it out.
Week 3: Chiefs
Prediction: Loss
The Ravens will have every opportunity to finally snag a win from Patrick Mahomes. However, it will be difficult to overcome a Super Bowl winning team that returns a ridiculous number of starters, especially when Covid steals homefield advantage from you.
Week 4: @ Washington Football Team
Prediction: Win
The WFT comes into the season with a new brand and a fearsome looking defensive line. However, there are too many questions on offense to think the Redskins are likely to beat a stacked Ravens roster.
Week 5: Bengals
Prediction: Win
Joe Burrow has all the tools needed to be an excellent NFL starter. The AFC North is a cold and hostile place however, and it will be difficult to exhibit those talents in year one.
Week 6: @ Eagles
Prediction: Win
The Eagles WR group will have a tough time getting anything going against the Ravens secondary, especially if they have to play from behind. Look for the offense to chew clock and force the Eagles to throw early and often.
Week 7: Steelers
Prediction: Win
Its hard to know how good Pittsburgh will be without seeing the state of Big Ben, but Mike Tomlin is a great head coach and always puts a good team on the field. Since the Ravens and Steelers almost always seems to split, the Ravens are likely to take the contest at home.
Week 8: Bye
The players get much needed rest while I sit in my house cheering for AFC rivals to lose.
Week 9: @ Colts
Prediction: Loss
This Ravens team is stacked, but they are likely to lose a game they should have won, and Indy seems a likely culprit. A talented roster that gets even a decent level of play from Rivers could cause the Ravens to slip up.
Week 10: @ Patriots
Prediction: Win
Belichek always puts a decent product on the field, but a Patriots team that lost the goat QB and was ravaged by opt outs may struggle this season, especially against a team like the Ravens.
Week 11: Titans
Prediction: Win
Revenge game time. A revamped front 7 and a vengeful Lamar Jackson show the Titans how the first game should have gone.
Week 12: @ Steelers
Prediction: Loss
The Ravens-Steelers rivalry is as evenly matched as it is brutal, and its likely the Steelers will be able to split the series with a win at home.
Week 13: Cowboys
Prediction: Win
Dallas has a scary WR corps with the addition of Ceedee Lamb, but after losing Travis Frederick, they might struggle against the Ravens strong secondary and blitz happy front. Ravens win by one score.
Week 14: @ Browns
Prediction: Loss
As stated previously, the Browns have a great roster on paper, and should be a threat. A run first offense with Chubb that utilizes the strong pass catching unit they have could well hand the Ravens a loss later in the season. Or they might continue to be the Browns and not do that at all, but I remain cautious that they can figure it out this year.
Week 15: Jaguars
Prediction: Win
Calais gets to catch up with some old friends while sitting on the bench watching the Ravens offense pound the rock. Ravens cruise to victory.
Week 16: Giants
Prediction: Win
The Giants add an important piece by acquiring a strong Left Tackle but they need to fill a few more holes to compete.
Week 17: u/Bengals
Prediction: Win
Bengals get an advantage as they are comfortable playing at home in an empty stadium, but it is the Lamar Jackson show once again.
Final Record: 12-4
History states that regression is likely after a 14-2 season, and this prediction reflects that. However, the Ravens should still be very strong and Lamar will get his chance once again to prove himself in the post season.
Offensive and Defensive Schemes
Offense: The Ravens debuted a unique offense last year that focused on rushing the ball and using heavy sets with tight ends. The entire offense hinges on the threat of Lamar Jackson running the football. Teams are forced to stay honest up front, or they risk getting gouged by a QB scramble. This allows the Ravens offense to utilize a lot of reads in which Lamar can hand the ball off or keep it himself based on how certain players react. This dynamic run scheme thus allows the passing game by opening holes in the secondary. Look for the Ravens to add more wrinkles in 2020 and utilizes more passing attempts to help the offense remain ahead of the curve.
Defense: The Ravens defense is all about pressure. The Ravens blitz at the highest rate in the NFL. DC Wink Martindale uses multiple looks to confuse quarterbacks by disguising blitzes and coverage. The lynch pin of the scheme is the secondary, which can be left on an island while the front brings pressure. Look for the Ravens to continue this trend in 2020, going after QBs to force mistakes.
Conclusion: The Ravens project as one of the best teams in the NFL, and they need to prove themselves in the post season to take the next step.
Link to hub: https://www.reddit.com/nfl/comments/hju9t3/offseason_review_series_call_for_writers/
submitted by Jonnyawesome89 to nfl [link] [comments]


2020.08.18 00:51 Jonnyawesome89 Offseason Review Series: Baltimore Ravens

Coming off an incredible 14-2 regular season in which the Ravens, led by MVP Lamar Jackson, shocked the league with an innovative offense that ran all over opponents. The team looks toward a 2020 campaign in which they will attempt to shake the sting to an extremely disappointing first round playoff exit.
[Ravens]
Division: AFC North
Coaching Changes
In a season rocked by uncertainty due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Ravens have a significant advantage in the fact that they retain both coordinators and head coach after a successful season. In February, head coach John Harbaugh announced title changes for 6 members of the staff (per baltimoreravens.com):
· Chris Horton – special teams coordinator (formerly special teams coach)
· Randy Brown – special teams coach (formerly assistant special teams coach)
· Chris Hewitt – pass defense coordinator (formerly defensive backs coach)
· Sterling Lucas – defensive assistant/defensive line (formerly defensive assistant/linebackers)
· Jesse Minter – defensive backs coach (formerly assistant defensive backs coach)
· Drew Wilkins – outside linebackers coach (formerly assistant defensive line and outside linebackers coach)
Chris Horton
Horton enters his second year guiding the Ravens' special teams unit after taking over for longtime coordinator Jerry Rosburg following his retirement in 2019. Last season, Pro Bowl and first-team All-Pro K Justin Tucker finished second in the NFL with a 96.6 percent field goal success rate (28 of 29), which was also the second-best mark in franchise single-season history. Baltimore also finished eighth in punt return average (8.2) in 2019. A seventh-year coach with the Ravens, Horton has been working with the special teams group since 2015.
Randy Brown
Brown is in his 13th year working with the Ravens' specialists. He has had an instrumental role in the development of the team's kicking game by helping Tucker become the most accurate kicker of all time (90.8 percent). Tucker has scored 141 points in each of his past four seasons, which tie for the Ravens single-season scoring record and make him the NFL's only kicker to surpass the 140 mark in each of the last four years (2016-19).
Chris Hewitt
Hewitt enters his ninth-year coaching with the Ravens after serving as the team's defensive backs coach for the past five seasons (2015-19). Last season, Baltimore's pass defense finished sixth in the NFL (207.2 ypg) with three players from the secondary earning Pro Bowl honors (CB Marlon Humphrey, CB Marcus Peters and S Earl Thomas III). Humphrey and Peters also earned first-team All-Pro accolades. Baltimore tallied a 77.5 defensive passer rating in 2019, which stood as the NFL's second-best mark.
Sterling Lucas
Lucas is in his fifth season with the Ravens after joining the team in 2016 as a strength and conditioning assistant in 2016. He has also served as an administrative assistant – defense (2017), quality control – defense (2018) and most recently as defensive assistant/linebackers (2019). Prior to joining Baltimore, Lucas spent two years as a defensive graduate assistant at North Carolina State.
Jesse Minter
Minter has been with the Ravens since 2017, when he started as a defensive assistant. He was promoted to assistant defensive backs coach in 2019, when he worked under Hewitt. This past season, Baltimore tied (Tampa Bay) for the NFL lead with six defensive touchdowns (including three interceptions returned for touchdowns).
Drew Wilkins
Wilkins enters his 11th year with the Ravens after initially joining the team as a football video operations intern in 2010. He served as the team's assistant defensive line & outside linebackers coach the past two seasons (2018-19). Wilkins originally moved to the coaching side in 2013, when he became a coaching staff assistant. He was promoted to defensive assistant in 2014 before becoming the assistant defensive line coach in 2017. In 2019, OLB Matthew Judon led the Ravens with a career-high 9.5 sacks and four forced fumbles. The Ravens also finished with 111 quarterback hits, the NFL's third-most.
Free Agency:
Players Lost/Cut
Player Position New Team
Tony Jefferson SS Released
James Hurst OT Released
Michael Pierce DT FA, Minnesota
Josh Bynes ILB FA, Cincinatti
Patrick Onwuasor ILB FA, NY Jets
Seth Roberts WR FA, Carolina
Hayden Hurst TE Traded, Atlanta
Chris Wormley DE Traded, Pittsburgh
De’Anthony Thomas WKR Opt-Out
Andre Smith OT Opt-Out
In an offseason with a few notable departures for the Ravens, none is more impactful than the retirement of OG Marshal Yanda. A 13-year veteran, Yanda anchored the Ravens offensive line, and was consistently amongst the best guards in football. Not just a dominant force on the field, Yanda brought veteran leadership to a young Ravens squad that found a lot of success in the regular season. Now retired, he become a prospect for the NFL Hall of Fame. Marshal Yanda is a caliber of player that is not easily replaced, and the loss of his ability and leadership is one of the biggest question marks for the Ravens offense going into 2020.
Michael Pierce came into the league as an UDFA who was able to become an immediate contributor for the Ravens front 7. An imposing figure at over 330 lbs., Pierce, along with Ravens stalwart Brandon Williams created a stout, if not agile, front for the Ravens defense. Following a 2019 in which Pierce came into camp overweight and out of shape, his long-term future with the team was immediately brought into question, culminating with him signing with the Minnesota Vikings this offseason. The additions by the Ravens of Calais Campbell and Derek Wolfe this offseason softens the blow considerably, and the unit may even look to be improved headed into this year.
When it comes to Baltimore Ravens and Greg Roman offenses, extensive use of Tight Ends immediately comes to mind. It was therefore surprising to some when the Ravens decided to trade former first round pick Hayden Hurst to the Falcons this offseason. Hurst played significant snaps for the Ravens in a system that heavily utilizes tight ends. Unfortunately for Hurst, he was injured his rookie season and struggled for targets behind Mark Andrews, who has made a case to be considered a top TE in the league. Ultimately, this may be a rare win-win trade, as Hurst will have an opportunity to flourish with Matt Ryan on a Falcons team who recently lost Austin Hooper, while the Ravens were thrilled to use the resulting pick on standout RB JK Dobbins, who fits their system perfectly.
While neither player was a force in the back field last season, the simultaneous losses of Josh Bynes and Patrick Onwuasor presents an interesting challenge for the Ravens, who are now likely to feature two rookies (Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison) heavily in their rotation this year.
The inclusion of opt-outs due to Covid-19 made this offseason tricky for some teams, but the Ravens were relatively unscathed. While the loss of De’Anthony Thomas and Andre Smith does impact depth, ultimately both players were replacement level, and their loss does not represent a significant challenge for 2020.
Players Acquired

Player Position Old Team Length Salary
Matthew Judon DE Ravens Franchise Tag $16.3MM
Derek Wolfe DE Broncos 1 Year $3MM
Jihad Ward DE Ravens 1 Year $1.1MM
Jimmy Smith CB Ravens 1 Year $3.5MM
Anthony Levine Sr S Ravens 1 Year $1.81MM
Chris Moore WR Ravens 1 Year $1.7MM
Sam Koch P Ravens 2 Years $4.95MM
Matt Skura C Ravens 1 Year RFA Tender
Chuck Clark SS Ravens 3 Years $15.3MM
Jordan Richards S Ravens 1 Year $845k
Gus Edwards RB Ravens 1 Year $750K
Nick Moore LS Ravens 1 Year $610K
Calais Campbell DE Jaguars 2 Years $25MM
DJ Fluker OG Seahawks 1 Year $1.07MM
Pernell McPhee DE Ravens 1 Year $1.1MM
While the Ravens did not make a ton of moves on outside players, they did make a big splash early in the offseason with the acquisition of Calais Campbell. At the low cost of just a 5th round pick, the Ravens were able to acquire a perennial pro bowler and veteran leader. A no brainer for the cost, by making this move, along with the signing of Derek Wolfe, the Ravens were able to address their D Line, a unit that was exposed last year by both Nick Chubb and Derek Henry. On the offensive line, the Ravens were able to add DJ Fluker, who can immediately slot into the void left by Marshal Yanda. While Fluker will certainly be a drop off from the Hall of Fame prospect Yanda, his veteran presence should help minimize the impact of losing such an important player.
On the re-signing front, the name of the game was continuity. The Ravens were able to accomplish this goal, returning key pieces of the 2019 squad. Most notably, the Ravens were able to keep intact what was one of the best secondaries in the NFL last year down the stretch. By re-signing Chuck Clark, Anthony Levine, Jimmy Smith and extending Marcus Peters (with already signed players Marlon Humphrey and Earl Thomas) the Ravens are once again slated to have one of the best secondaries in the NFL. This is key, as the Ravens clock chewing, points scoring offense often forces enemy teams to play from behind, and the Ravens defense is once again set up to make passing the ball extremely difficult. At the DE position the Ravens tagged Matthew Judon. A productive player with a high amount of pressures in 2019, Judon was important to retain on an extremely thin DE unit. On offense, they returned RB Gus Edwards and starting C Matt Skura. Skura is an important piece, as his loss was keenly felt against the Titans following his season ending injury in the Rams game.
Draft
The Ravens are known across the NFL for accumulating picks through trades and compensatory selections. This year was no exception, as the Ravens had 10 total selections, including a whopping 6 picks in the first three rounds.

Round Pick (OVR) Player Position School
1 28 (28) Patrick Queen LB LSU
2 23 (55) JK Dobbins RB Ohio State
3 7 (71) Justin Madubuike DT Texas A&M
3 28 (92) Devin Duvernay WR Texas
3 34 (98) Malik Harrison LB Ohio State
3 42 (106) Tyre Phillips OT Miss State
4 37 (143) Ben Bredeson G Michigan
5 25 (170) Broderick Washington DT Texas Tech
6 22 (201) James Proche WR SMU
7 5 (219) Geno Stone S Iowa

Draft Grades:
Round 1:
Patrick Queen: A+
One of the most notable weaknesses of the Ravens Defense in 2019 was the linebacking corps. After losing CJ Mosley the previous offseason, the remaining LBs proved unequal to the task, culminating in a complete reshuffling of the position with off the street free agents a few weeks into the season. While the new group was serviceable, the Ravens had a noticeably porous run defense when playing from behind, which was not an issue for much of the year but got completely exposed in an embarrassing round 1 playoff exit. This made LB a huge position of need. The Ravens, true to their reputation, remained patient in the first round while other teams linked to first round LB talent, (teams like Green Bay and New Orleans) went elsewhere, and other teams made reaches, (notably the Seahawks one pick earlier) and still got their guy, much later than originally projected. Queen is an exciting addition to the Ravens Defense. Fast and with great instincts, Queen has a knack for always being around the play. He shows up in the biggest moments, snagging a key interception from Tua Tagovailoa against Alabama and earning Defensive MVP honors in the national championship game. Queen does have some weaknesses, with weak tackling at times and only one year of proven production. However, given the Ravens’ ability to develop linebackers, they must have been ecstatic to snag a player who many analysists believed would be long gone by pick 28.
Round 2:
JK Dobbins: A-
The Ravens had perhaps the most dominant rushing attack of the modern era in 2019, which caused many to be shocked when they selected a running back with their second pick of the NFL Draft. However, anyone who is a close observer of the Ravens understood the selection. The Ravens live by the mantra of “Best Player Available” and as an organization refuse to reach for positions of need. This has made them one of the more successful organizations in the draft, as they consistently find value with their picks. Dobbins is a perfect fit for the Ravens system. He is a shifty back with great vision who demonstrated great understanding of how to take what the defense gives him. This projects very well into an offense that opens so many holes with a dominant line and constant running threat of MVP Lamar Jackson. Dobbins should be an immediate contributor and projects as the long-term starter, particularly if the Ravens part ways with Mark Ingram after this year. He is the second All-Time rusher at Ohio State, ahead of players like Ezekiel Elliott and Eddie George. His ability to run out of the pistol makes him a great complement to Lamar Jackson in RPO situations.
Rounds 3:
Justin Madubuke: A
Every year the Ravens seem to have a pick in the mid rounds that dumbfounds analysts. This is because they have a knack for scooping up players that should not still be on the board without giving up capital to do so. In this example, the Ravens traded back from pick 60, and likely still got the player they were targeting. Madubuike is a mountain at 6’3, 293 pounds, and has shown success at not only containing the run but pressuring the QB. Madubuike provides an infusion of youth to a defensive line that is one of the older units on the team. This pick is also indicative of the Ravens commitment to returning to their run stuffing roots, the front office was clearly unhappy with the pain inflicted by Derek Henry in the divisional round.
Devin Duvernay: B+
Coming into 2020, the Ravens WRS are the biggest question mark on the roster. An extremely inexperienced unit, many thought that it was a position that would be addressed much earlier in the draft. However, the Ravens were patient, and snagged the guy they wanted in Devin Duvernay. Duvernay had extremely successful 2019, racking up 1,386 yards and showcasing very reliable hands. The speedy, sure-handed nature of Duvernay’s game is a definite complement to Lamar Jacksons playstyle, as the Ravens rely on efficiency over volume in the passing game. One consideration with Duvernay moving forward is that he is most effective from the slot, which is rather crowded with the Ravens current lineup of pass catchers.
Malik Harrison: A-
As with Patrick Queen, the Ravens were clearly motivated to overhaul a weak line backing unit that was picked on at times in 2019. Harrison, a large, run thumping LB, projects as a great complement to the speedy, instinctual Queen. The Ravens were clearly motivated to fix their run stopping issues. Harrison is a large presence who is extremely reliable in maintaining his gap assignments, which should go a long way in shoring up the Ravens run D.
Tyre Phillips: B-
With the last pick of the third round, an exhausted Roger Goodell announced the pick of Tyre Phillips. Phillips, a 6 ft 5, 345 pound OT, is likely to be involved in the Ravens competition at guard to replace Marshal Yanda. Phillips shows great size and natural athleticism, with some roughness to his technique. While he was drafted earlier than predicted, Phillips will have the chance to grow in the Ravens’ system and compete for a starting role.
Round 4:
Ben Bredeson: A-
An All Big Ten player under head coach John Harbaugh’s brother Jim at Michigan, Ben Bredeson seemed destined to stay in the Harbaugh family. A great complement to the previous pick of Phillips, Bredeson projects as more pro ready on day one. There are concerns about his natural length at the pro level, however, with his technique, Bredeson should be in the mix early on. Adding a second offensive line here was a great move by the Ravens to help shore up their interior O line.
Round 5:
Broderick Washington: C
The Ravens addressed defensive line again in round 5, in a move that was a head scratcher to some. The Ravens like Washington as a player and as a leader, and so did not hesitate to grab him. While this does seem like somewhat of a luxury pick, Washington will get the chance to learn from great players like Calais Campbell and Derek Wolfe. Washington doesn’t need to feel pressured to contribute year one. This pick once again demonstrates the Ravens commitment to “Best player Available”.
Round 6:
James Proche: B+
In a surprise move, the Ravens traded back in to acquire James Proche. A player who analysts like Mel Kiper thought would go much higher, the Ravens get to add another prospect to their stable of young WRs. Proche is a speedy, productive, sure-handed WR that seems to be the favorite of QB Lamar Jackson. With the opting out of De’Anthony Thomas, Proche’s most likely route to the field in year one will be as a kick returner.
Round 7:
Geno Stone: B
With their 10th and final selection of the draft, the Ravens snagged S Geno Stone. An intelligent, cagey safety at Iowa, Stone fell to the seventh round due to concerns around his athleticism. He will have to prove himself to make a stacked roster. However, he does project as a special teams contributor with some long term potential upside in a safety group that lacks depth.
Overall A: In a draft with many picks, the Ravens acquired a lot of good players with immediate contribution potential. They were able to make a good team better without making drastic moves or giving up significant capital. The Ravens FO are masters at letting the draft come to them, and once again they had a consensus great draft that was lauded by analysts.
Other Offseason News that Affected the Team
The Ravens avoided major drama in the offseason. There were, however, a few stories of note in the media.
Earl Thomas Incident: Earl Thomas was in the news following an altercation with his wife in which she allegedly pointed a gun at his head. Thomas’ wife Nina reportedly tracked Earl and his brother to a rental house, were they were shacked up with women. The Ravens were reported to be very displeased with Thomas, who did not alert the team to the story ahead of time. One point that is important to note, that while the entire incident was very strange, Earl was not in the same room as his brother as was being speculated on the internet. Both brothers were in different rooms with their respective partners.
Lamar Jackson: After a breakout MVP season, Lamar has become a veritable superstar, notably gracing the cover of Madden.
Antonio Brown: After being filmed working out with quarterback Lamar Jackson and his cousin, WR Hollywood Brown, Antonio Brown has been repeatedly linked with the Ravens. Jackson has gone as far as to publicly advocate for signing the wayward receiver. However, given that Brown will be suspended for half of the season, and Owner Steve Bischotti has publicly eschewed the idea of signing players with domestic violence issues following the Ray Rice incident, a pairing of Antonio Brown and Jackson seems unlikely.
Hollywood Brown: While not a national story, one thing that Ravens fans are excited about is the offseason progress of Hollywood Brown. After having a screw surgically removed from his foot, Brown has been posting his workouts and has reportedly gained 23 pounds from last year.
Mo Gaba: A heart breaking story this offseason, the passing of Ravens superfan Mo Gaba was announced on July 28th. A dedicated fan of Baltimore sports, Mo passed at age 14 after multiple battles with cancer. He was heavily involved with the Ravens organization, notably announcing the Ravens selection of Ben Powers as the first every draft pick announced via braille in 2019. He was known as a ray of light by many Ravens players, and always had a sunny and cheery disposition despite the struggles he faced. This post is dedicated to his life, and Mo is beloved across Ravens nation.
Latest Injury and FA News:
Iman Marshal: Torn ACL, out for the year.
Chris Moore: Broken finger, out for a few weeks.
Dez Bryant: The FA WR, has reportedly garnered interest from the Ravens front office and is traveling to Baltimore for a workout.
Projected Starting Lineup:
· QB: Lamar Jackson:
Following an incredible MVP season, expectations are heaped high on QB Lamar Jackson. Jackson amazed with his running ability, making elite athletes routinely look foolish with his juking ability and speed. He was also incredibly efficient in the passing game, leveraging his running threat to keep defenses spread thin. Lamar is expected to continue his dominance this year, as his unique skillset is incredibly difficult to plan for. Jackson has his sights set on the post season, as his 0-2 playoff record is one black mark on an otherwise incredible start to his career.
· RB: Mark Ingram:
Ingram proved to be a force in 2019 as a complement to Lamar, as he chewed up defenses frozen by Jacksons rushing ability for YAC and first downs on a routine basis. As with last year the Ravens will address running back with a committee, expect to see Gus Edwards and new addition JK Dobbins feature heavily in the offense.
· FB: Patrick Ricard:
One of the NFLS few remaining two-way players, Ricard is an 800-pound gorilla whose lead blocking ability sets the tone of the Ravens hardnosed rushing offense.
· TE: Mark Andrews, Nick Boyle:
A dynamic duo, Andrews and Boyle will have more responsibility following the offseason departure of Hayden Hurst. Boyle has proven himself as one of the most effective blockers at the tight end position in the NFL, and he acts almost like another linemen, mauling defense fronts and empowering the run game. Andrews has emerged as one of the premier TE receiving threats in the NFL, and will have the opportunity this year to take the leap needed to reach the tier of players like George Kittle, Travis Kelsey, and Zach Ertz.
· WR: Hollywood Brown, Willie Snead, Miles Boykin:
In an offense that does not heavily feature WR play, the Ravens young corps will need to step up to get the Ravens over the hump in the playoffs. Brown and Boykin will need to take a leap in their second years to solidify the group. Brown faces the weight of expectation as many believe he has the potential to become the 1,000-yard WR threat the Ravens have lacked for most of their franchises’ history.
· LT: Ronnie Stanley:
The best LT in the NFL, Stanley imposes his will on defenders and anchors an offensive line that was dominant in 2019. Stanley’s play last year earned him all pro honors and the biggest question around him is how expensive he will become following the block buster extension signed by Laremy Tunsil this offseason,
· LG: Bradley Boseman:
An average to above average starter at left guard, Bozeman did a good job in 2019. While he will face competition for his spot from players like Ben Powers and Ben Bredeson, he projects to start again in 2020.
· C: Matt Skura: The starting center who was lost mid-season due to injury, Skura’s return is of keen importance to the Ravens. Skura’s back up, Patrick Mekari, did a great job filling in, but was ultimately exposed in the Titan’s game, contributing to the Ravens offensive woes in that matchup.
· RG: DJ Fluker: A road grader in the run game who is average to below average in the passing game, Fluker’s skillset fits what the Ravens are trying to accomplish. While there will be a competition for this spot, the ability to plug in a veteran like Fluker over a first- or second-year player makes him the likely candidate to replace Ravens great Marshal Yanda.
· RT: Orlando Brown Jr.:
A gigantic human being who followed in his father’s footsteps, Brown along with Stanley formed one of the best young tackle duos in the NFL. Brown Jr. was extremely solid in 2019 and should only get better going into this year.
· DL: Derek Wolfe, Calais Campbell, Brandon Williams, Jaylon Ferguson:
A group ultimately marked by its failure to stop the run in 2019, the Ravens completely overhauled their starting lineup. The addition of Campbell and Wolfe to a unit that returns Brandon Williams to his natural position of NT should see significant improvement heading into this year.
· LB: Matthew Judon, Patrick Queen, LJ Fort:
A unit that was so weak last year that the Ravens were signing players off the street to start, the LB corps has a lot to live up to in 2020. One of the team’s larger question marks, the LB corps’ effectiveness will ultimately hinge on what level of contribution it can get from rookies Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison.
· CB: Marlon Humphrey, Tavon Young, Marcus Peters:
Featuring one of the best CB duos in the league in Peters and Humphrey, the Ravens CBs will somehow be even better with the return of slot corner Tavon Young from injury. This CB group will be focused on being the best unit in the league, and there is no reason why they should not accomplish that goal.
· S: Chuck Clark, Earl Thomas:
The Ravens Safety group struggled last year until the injury of Tony Jefferson, and over the season anchored a very effective secondary. There were questions at times about Thomas’ hustle, but he will undoubtedly contribute heavily. Clark played well enough to earn a large extension, and his intelligence will feature heavily in the complicated Martindale system.
· K: Justin Tucker:
Not much to say about this one, Justin Tucker is just better than every other kicker in the league. He is extremely clutch and an absolute weapon on game winning drives, oh and he sings opera too.
· P: Sam Koch:
A player who reinvented the way his position is played, Sam Koch rejoins the wolf pack for another season with a fresh leg, after barely having to punt last year. Not a bad gig.
· KR: Justice Hill:
In a crowded RB room, KR may be the best way for the speedy Hill to see the field consistently next year.
· PR: James Proche:
A shifty and speedy talent with extremely sure hands, Proche will compete immediately for the PR spot, and should see time there in 2020.
Position Group Strengths and Weaknesses
Position groups:
· QB: The Ravens are very strong at the QB position. With the League MVP in Lamar Jackson, and an above average back up in RGIII, the team should feel extremely confident about its QB room.
· Backfield: The Ravens have one of the strongest RB Corps in the league, and all 4 RBS should contribute in many ways in the Ravens unique offense.
· OL: One of the strongest units in 2019, the OL should take a step back with the loss of Marshal Yanda. How the unit adjusts to this change will be one of the most important questions for the team to answer this year,
· Pass Catchers: Efficiency is the name of the game for the Ravens passing game and that will be the story in 2020. While there are many teams in the league with more productive TE and WR rooms, the Ravens offensive scheme should allow players like Hollywood Brown and Mark Andrews to be big contributors.
· DL: The DL must do its part in washing the stain of Derek Henry’s play off performance from the Raven’s memory. This unit appears to be much improved and should be poised to do so under the leadership of Calais Campbell.
· LB: This unit is a huge question mark and we will not know how good they are until we can see the impact of the rookies firsthand. If Patrick Queen and Harrison are ready to contribute right away, it should be a solid group.
· Secondary: The Ravens have across the board the most complete secondary in the league, bar none. This unit was extremely strong last year and should remain so in 2020.
· Special Teams: Special Teams has traditionally been a strength for the Ravens. The kicking and punting units should continue to be top of the league, while there are some questions on how the KR and PR teams will perform this year.
Schedule Prediction
Week 1: Browns
Prediction: Win
The Browns have a talented roster and could be a huge threat if they can pull things together in 2020. However, installing a new HC with the limitations of covid places the Ravens as the week one favorites.
Week 2: @ Texans
Prediction: Win
Houston is hard to predict given the instability of the O’Brien regime. However, a Texans team that got trounced by the Ravens last year and lost their star WR will have a hard time overcoming an improved Ravens. The score will likely be closer, but the Ravens should pull it out.
Week 3: Chiefs
Prediction: Loss
The Ravens will have every opportunity to finally snag a win from Patrick Mahomes. However, it will be difficult to overcome a Super Bowl winning team that returns a ridiculous number of starters, especially when Covid steals homefield advantage from you.
Week 4: @ Washington Football Team
Prediction: Win
The WFT comes into the season with a new brand and a fearsome looking defensive line. However, there are too many questions on offense to think the Redskins are likely to beat a stacked Ravens roster.
Week 5: Bengals
Prediction: Win
Joe Burrow has all the tools needed to be an excellent NFL starter. The AFC North is a cold and hostile place however, and it will be difficult to exhibit those talents in year one.
Week 6: @ Eagles
Prediction: Win
The Eagles WR group will have a tough time getting anything going against the Ravens secondary, especially if they have to play from behind. Look for the offense to chew clock and force the Eagles to throw early and often.
Week 7: Steelers
Prediction: Win
Its hard to know how good Pittsburgh will be without seeing the state of Big Ben, but Mike Tomlin is a great head coach and always puts a good team on the field. Since the Ravens and Steelers almost always seems to split, the Ravens are likely to take the contest at home.
Week 8: Bye
The players get much needed rest while I sit in my house cheering for AFC rivals to lose.
Week 9: @ Colts
Prediction: Loss
This Ravens team is stacked, but they are likely to lose a game they should have won, and Indy seems a likely culprit. A talented roster that gets even a decent level of play from Rivers could cause the Ravens to slip up.
Week 10: @ Patriots
Prediction: Win
Belichek always puts a decent product on the field, but a Patriots team that lost the goat QB and was ravaged by opt outs may struggle this season, especially against a team like the Ravens.
Week 11: Titans
Prediction: Win
Revenge game time. A revamped front 7 and a vengeful Lamar Jackson show the Titans how the first game should have gone.
Week 12: @ Steelers
Prediction: Loss
The Ravens-Steelers rivalry is as evenly matched as it is brutal, and its likely the Steelers will be able to split the series with a win at home.
Week 13: Cowboys
Prediction: Win
Dallas has a scary WR corps with the addition of Ceedee Lamb, but after losing Travis Frederick, they might struggle against the Ravens strong secondary and blitz happy front. Ravens win by one score.
Week 14: @ Browns
Prediction: Loss
As stated previously, the Browns have a great roster on paper, and should be a threat. A run first offense with Chubb that utilizes the strong pass catching unit they have could well hand the Ravens a loss later in the season. Or they might continue to be the Browns and not do that at all, but I remain cautious that they can figure it out this year.
Week 15: Jaguars
Prediction: Win
Calais gets to catch up with some old friends while sitting on the bench watching the Ravens offense pound the rock. Ravens cruise to victory.
Week 16: Giants
Prediction: Win
The Giants add an important piece by acquiring a strong Left Tackle but they need to fill a few more holes to compete.
Week 17: u/Bengals
Prediction: Win
Bengals get an advantage as they are comfortable playing at home in an empty stadium, but it is the Lamar Jackson show once again.
Final Record: 12-4
History states that regression is likely after a 14-2 season, and this prediction reflects that. However, the Ravens should still be very strong and Lamar will get his chance once again to prove himself in the post season.
Offensive and Defensive Schemes
Offense: The Ravens debuted a unique offense last year that focused on rushing the ball and using heavy sets with tight ends. The entire offense hinges on the threat of Lamar Jackson running the football. Teams are forced to stay honest up front, or they risk getting gouged by a QB scramble. This allows the Ravens offense to utilize a lot of reads in which Lamar can hand the ball off or keep it himself based on how certain players react. This dynamic run scheme thus allows the passing game by opening holes in the secondary. Look for the Ravens to add more wrinkles in 2020 and utilizes more passing attempts to help the offense remain ahead of the curve.
Defense: The Ravens defense is all about pressure. The Ravens blitz at the highest rate in the NFL. DC Wink Martindale uses multiple looks to confuse quarterbacks by disguising blitzes and coverage. The lynch pin of the scheme is the secondary, which can be left on an island while the front brings pressure. Look for the Ravens to continue this trend in 2020, going after QBs to force mistakes.
Conclusion: The Ravens project as one of the best teams in the NFL, and they need to prove themselves in the post season to take the next step.
submitted by Jonnyawesome89 to ravens [link] [comments]


2020.07.25 15:46 PM-ME-A-PRIME-NUMBER Offseason Review Series: The 2020 New York Jets

New York Jets

Division: AFC East
 
1 New England Patriots (12-4)
2 Buffalo Bills (10-6)
3 New York Jets (7-9)
4 Miami Dolphins (5-11)
 

Coaching Changes

The Jets did not make any major coaching changes this offseason, retaining HC Adam Gase, OC Dowell Loggains, and DC Gregg Williams.
 

Free Agency

Players Lost/Cut
Player Position New Team
Trevor Siemian QB Free Agent
Bilal Powell RB Free Agent
Ty Montgomery RB New Orleans
Robby Anderson WR Carolina
Demaryius Thomas WR Free Agent
Kelvin Beachum LT Arizona
Brent Qvale LG Houston
Ryan Kalil C Free Agent
Tom Compton RG San Francisco
Brandon Shell RT Seattle
Brandon Copeland EDGE New England
Paul Worrilow ILB Free Agent
Albert McClellan ILB Free Agent
Trumaine Johnson CB Free Agent
Darryl Roberts FS Detroit
Rontez Miles FS Free Agent
Blake Countess DB Free Agent
Lachlan Edwards P Free Agent
 
The Jets reshaped their weapons for Sam Darnold this offseason, losing three veterans and bringing in a number of free agents and draft picks. GM Joe Douglas opted not to re-sign RB Bilal Powell who the Jets drafted in 2011, and he remains a free agent. Most significantly, Douglas allowed his top offensive weapon in WR Robby Anderson to walk to Carolina on a 2-year, $20.0 MM deal, creating a void at outside receiver. The team has also not re-signed WR Demaryius Thomas, who filled in for Quincy Enunwa last season and remains a free agent.
 
The biggest change that the Jets made to their personnel this offseason was along the offensive line, and as such there were a number of veteran casualties. LT Kelvin Beachum started for the Jets from 2017 to 2019, but he seems to have regressed, but he projects to compete for Arizona on a 1-year deal. The Jets also let C Ryan Kalil go, who unretired to snap for Sam Darnold last offseason but disappointed and got injured, and he remains a free agent. RG Tom Compton was forced into action last season with the injury to Brian Winters, and he, as is characteristic of his NFL career thus far, struggled massively in run blocking and pass pro, but he projects to compete anyway next year for San Francisco on a 1-year deal. Joe Douglas and Adam Gase never expressed interest in RT Brandon Shell for the long term, benching him for the raw Chuma Edoga early in 2019, so it was not a surprise to see the Jets let Shell go to start for Seattle on a 2-year contract.
 
The Jets mostly kept their 7th-ranked total defense in tact this offseason, only losing two key pieces. EDGE Brandon Copeland left for New England on a 1-year contract, which is not a surprising location, as Copeland is a great utility player, functioning as a rush linebacker, an off-ball linebacker, and a core special teamer for the Jets in 2019. Similarly, Joe Douglas has not re-signed the versatile FS Rontez Miles, who has played high safety, box safety, and a key special-teams role during his seven-year Jets tenure, and he remains a free agent.
 
The Jets cut CB Trumaine Johnson, which was virtually a no-brainer after two injury-plagued seasons in which his lack of speed was frequently exposed. The only real decision was whether to cut Johnson immediately, which would have resulted in a $12.0 MM dead cap hit in 2020, or to designate Johnson as a post-June 1 cut, which would have resulted in a $4.0 MM dead cap hit in 2020 and a $8.0 MM dead cap hit in 2021. Joe Douglas opted for the latter, meaning that the Jets saved a total of $11.0 MM by cutting Johnson in 2020. Grade: A
 
The Jets cut FS Darryl Roberts in mid-March. The Jets had high hopes for Roberts following the 2018 season, prompting them to sign him to a three-year contract with an out after one year. Roberts had a rocky first eight games of the season at cornerback before injuring his calf and being benched in favor of Maulet and Austin. Roberts remained a special-teams asset and good safety depth in December, but ultimately GM Joe Douglas decided he could cut Roberts, save $6.0 MM, and look elsewhere for a replacement. Grade: B
 
Players Signed
Player Position Old Team Length Salary
Joe Flacco QB Denver 1 year $1.5 MM
David Fales QB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Frank Gore RB Buffalo 1 year $1.1 MM
Breshad Perriman WR Tampa Bay 1 year $6.5 MM
Josh Doctson WR Minnesota 1 year $0.9 MM
Daniel Brown TE NY Jets 1 year $0.8 MM
Alex Lewis LG NY Jets 3 years $18.6 MM
Greg Van Roten LG Carolina 3 years $10.5 MM
Josh Andrews LG Indianapolis 1 year $1.0 MM
Connor McGovern C Denver 3 years $27.0 MM
George Fant RT Seattle 3 years $27.3 MM
Jordan Jenkins EDGE NY Jets 1 year $3.9 MM
Neville Hewitt ILB NY Jets 1 year $2.0 MM
Patrick Onwuasor ILB Baltimore 1 year $2.0 MM
James Burgess ILB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Pierre Desir CB Indianapolis 1 year $4.0 MM
Arthur Maulet CB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Quincy Wilson CB Indianapolis 1 year $1.3 MM
Brian Poole NCB NY Jets 1 year $5.0 MM
Bennett Jackson FS NY Jets 1 year $0.7 MM
 
Jets GM Joe Douglas used to work in Baltimore, where he was supposedly very influential in the decision to draft QB Joe Flacco, so this signing is far from surprising. While Joe Flacco may be trending down in his play, $1.5 MM feels like a bargain for the chance at solid veteran insurance for Sam Darnold. However, his neck surgery will supposedly keep him out for the opening of the season. Grade: B
 
After the draft, the Jets signed RB Frank Gore to a 1-year, $1.1 MM deal to ensure that he will play his 16th season in green and white. Gore is a physical back who played under Jets HC Adam Gase in San Francisco in 2008 and in Miami in 2018. Gore can take some of the pressure off of starting RB Le'Veon Bell in 2020 as the Jets move towards a "runningback by committee" system. Grade: B
 
The Jets-Ravens connection proved strong again with the signing of WR Breshad Perriman. Perriman was a first-round pick for the Ravens in 2015 while current Jets' Director of Player Personnel Chad Alexander was with Baltimore, and though he never really produced at a high level there, he had a resurgence in 2019 for the Buccaneers. Especially in November and December, where he performed at a 1000-yard rate projected over a whole season, Perriman proved to be a legitimate outside option across from Mike Evans with Chris Godwin in the slot. Perriman is a big, athletic receiver who projects to be worth the $6.5 MM deal to get a shot on the outside. Grade: A
 
Yet again, the Jets signed a former Ravens player, re-signing LG Alex Lewis, who played 2016 through 2018 with Baltimore before GM Joe Douglas traded for him in the 2019 offseason. Lewis stepped in for Kelechi Osemele last season and was a serviceable starter. Lewis is good in pass pro, versatile, and a good zone fit as a guard. However, Lewis could touch up on his penalties and overall run blocking for 2020. GM Joe Douglas only gave Lewis a 3-year, $18.6 MM deal which actually has an out after 1 year, which seems like a solid price to get another look at a 28-year-old guard who might be part of the team's future. Grade: B
 
The Jets' biggest free-agent singing in 2020 in terms of guaranteed money was former Broncos' C Connor McGovern at $18.0 MM. McGovern is an athletic lineman with experience at guard and center. He is a powerful center, and that serves him well in the run game. However, McGovern has a weak anchor and inconsistent pad level and leverage in the pass game. For this reason, despite the need at center, Joe Douglas' decision to commit two years to a center who is, perhaps, below average in pass pro is worthy of scrutiny. Grade: C
 
The biggest heavily-scrutinized acquisition that the Jets made in 2020 was probably signing former Seahawks RT George Fant to a 3-year, $27.3 MM contract. Fant functioned primarily as a swing tackle and as a sixth offensive lineman in Seattle, as he could not see the field as a starter over Germain Ifedi. Fant remains a very raw pass protector in terms of his anchor and the fluidity of his kickslide, and his ability in the run is only theoretically a strength in zone blocking. While Fant's contract has an out in 2021, it is a bit strange to see him making a similar salary to Bryan Bulaga and Halapoulvaati Vaitai. Grade: D
 
The Jets were patient in re-signing their own free agents, which probably helped get good value retaining EDGE Jordan Jenkins. Despite notching 15 combined sacks over the past two seasons, Jenkins only got $3.9 MM from the Jets. The sack number is a bit misleading, though, due to a high quantity of "coverage sacks" and a relatively modest pressure rate. However, Jenkins is a fine run defender, and he'll slot in as EDGE #1 again for the Jets in 2020. Grade: B
 
The Jets also acquired a former Raven on defense with LB Patrick Onwuasor, and they only paid $2.0 MM to bring him in. Onwuasor is an undersized linebacker but a good linear athlete, and while he struggles reading offensive cues and getting off of blocks to stop the run, he is a really good coverage player with the ability to get home as a pass rusher. Onwuasor has played next to CJ Mosley before, and he could potentially contribute in subpackage and base 4-3 looks, in addition to in a depth capacity and on special teams. Grade: A
 
With the cuts of Trumaine Johnson and Darryl Roberts, GM Joe Douglas decided to fill a starting cornerback spot with former Colts CB Pierre Desir on a 1-year, prove-it deal. Desir lacks longspeed, but he is a long, physical corner with decent short-area quickness. However, Desir lacks refinement in press and zone. With that said, $4.0 MM is a reasonable price to get a fill-in outside cornerback in 2020. Grade: B
 
This signing probably didnt get much national coverage, but re-signing CB Arthur Maulet could pay huge dividends for the Jets in 2020. In 2019, Trumaine Johnson and Darryl Roberts failed to hit expectations, forcing Maulet, Nate Hairston, and rookie Blessuan Austin into the outside cornerback rotation. Maulet is the only one of that group who was not benched for performance reasons. For a mere $0.9 MM, retaining a guy in Maulet who is familiar with the defense who will compete to start in 2020 is seemingly a no-brainer. Grade: A
 
Instead of making another draft choice, the Jets decided to trade pick 211 for former Colts CB Quincy Wilson. Wilson, a former 2nd-round pick, was a raw prospect coming out of Florida, and his penalties and lack of zone instincts followed him to the pros and led to his benching. However, Wilson is a big, long, and athletic corner, and at only 23 years of age, it makes sense that GM Joe Douglas wants to bring him on board to compete in an iffy cornerback room. Grade: C
 
This signing went somewhat under-the-radar, but Jets fans were thrilled when the team retained NCB Brian Poole to play slot on a 1-year, $5.0 MM contract. Poole is a good run defender with an ability to rush the passer, and he had a career year in coverage in 2019. Brian Poole is a good fit for Gregg Williams' defense, so retaining him to start in 2020 for a mere $5.0 MM seems to be a good value. Grade: B
 

Draft

Round Number Pos Player School
1 11 LT Mekhi Becton Louisville
2 59 WR Denzel Mims Baylor
3 68 FS Ashtyn Davis Cal
3 79 EDGE Jabari Zuniga Florida
4 120 RB La'Mical Perine Florida
4 125 QB James Morgan FIU
4 129 LT Cameron Clark Charlotte
5 158 CB Bryce Hall Virginia
6 191 P Braden Mann Texas A&M
 
The eleventh pick, Louisville LT Mekhi Becton, was my favorite acquisition that the Jets made during the 2020 offseason. While there were other options on the board, namely Tristan Wirfs, Henry Ruggs, and CeeDee Lamb, that the Jets presumably could have considered, Becton was the exact player I thought the Jets should take when he fell to 11. The first thing that stands out about Becton is his massive size, as he's 6'7", 364 lbs, with a monstrous 83-inch wingspan. Becton, however, is much more than a heavy lineman, as he defies expectations with his exceptional 5.1-flat movement skills. Becton is a hulking run blocker who is inexperienced but a fluid mover in pass pro. Becton projects to replace Kelvin Beachum and slide in at left tackle immediately in his rookie season. Grade: A
 
Wanting to add more picks to build the Jets in his image in his first year as GM, Joe Douglas opted to move down from 48 to 59 in the second round. This was a costly move, as it caused the Jets to miss out on AJ Epenesa and Darrell Taylor, but the Jets managed to grab a falling Senior Bowl standout in Baylor WR Denzel Mims. Mims is a height-weight-speed freak with good length, hands, and blocking. Mims should start at outside receiver across from Breshad Perriman in year one. Grade: B
 
The Jets' first third-round pick of 2020 was a real surprise to many fans, as although the team already had arguably the best safety tandem in football with Jamal Adams and Marcus Maye, the Jets drafted Cal FS Ashytn Davis with the 68th-overall draft selection. Davis is a freak athlete who played high safety, box safety, and even slot corner at Cal and would almost definitely have been drafted significantly higher but for teams' inability to medically check his groin post-surgery. It's possible that Gregg Williams will utilize Davis as a big nickel defender this year, but this selection could also give the Jets flexibility if Marcus Maye, who is a free agent in 2021, or Jamal Adams, with whom the Jets are supposedly far apart on a long-term contract, depart. Grade: B
 
Despite having a starting EDGE tandem consisting of Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham and losing Brandon Copeland to New England, the Jets did not add outside talent to the position group before the draft, forcing GM Joe Douglas to pick Florida EDGE Jabari Zuniga at 79 overall. Zuniga is a good linear athlete with a decent ability to set the edge and some interior versatility, and he could project to replace Jordan Jenkins as a starter in 2021. However, Zuniga struggles with stiff hips and slow reaction time at the snap, and plus he missed most of the 2019 season with ankle injuries. The Jets probably hit the right position with Zuniga, who should factor into the pass-rush rotation with Jenkins, Basham, and Kyle Phillips, but it's hard to justify drafting Zuniga with guys like Jonathan Greenard, Terrell Lewis, and DJ Wonnum still on the board. Grade: C
 
With his first day-3 selection as GM, Joe Douglas chose Florida RB La'Mical Perine. Perine is a physical runner with some receiving versatility out of the backfield. However, Perine doesn't really offer very much in terms of speed or vision, and drafting a RB instead of going offensive line, pass rush, receiver, or cornerback with Le'Veon Bell already in the fold was a curious move. Grade: D
 
The second of the Jets' 4th-round picks probably stirred up the most intrigue, as most casual football fans probably didn't expect the Jets to draft a quarterback. With that said, the Jets have gone a combined 0-6 over the past two seasons in games that Darnold did not start, and at this time David Fales was slated to be the backup quarterback, so drafting FIU QB James Morgan in the fourth round, which I thought was a value anyway, was a good choice. Morgan is a thick quarterback with a live arm with developmental potential. Grade: B
 
With their third pick in the fourth round, the Jets chose a player with the potential to start soon on the offensive line in Charlotte LT Cameron Clark. Clark is a powerful lineman who started at left tackle in his rSo, rJr, and rSr seasons and has good short-area quickness despite his 5.29 forty. Some have floated Cameron Clark as a potential convert to guard for the Jets due to his sloppy pass-pro footwork. Grade: B
 
The Jets addressed the secondary in round 5, taking Virginia CB Bryce Hall at 158 overall. Hall is a long, tall corner who moves well, has zone instincts, and contributes in the run game. However, Hall's struggles in press and off-man probably project him better as a safety in the NFL rather than as a corner, which doesn't seem to be a need with Adams, Maye, and Davis already in the fold, and Hall's ankle injury prevented him from working out at the Combine, leaving teams in a state of uncertainty about his health and his testing numbers. Grade: C
 
With their 6th-round pick, the Jets went special teams with Texas A&M P Braden Mann. Mann has a big leg and can handle kickoff duties. Mann projects to replace Lachlan Edwards, but this may have been a tad high for a punter. Grade: C
 
The Jets had an intriguing undrafted free agent class with a number of guys who warranted day-3 draft consideration, but two guys that I liked pre-draft stood out as being worth mentioning. Georgia WR Lawrence Cager is a physical receiver at the line of scrimmage and a redzone threat. Alabama NCB Shyheim Carter played the STAR role in Nick Saban's defense, and he proved his versatility as a college approximation of a nickel corner, a box safety, a high safety, and a subpackage linebacker, and he likely would have been drafted if teams had been able to conduct medical rechecks on him after a minor injury prevented him from working out at the Combine.
 

Other Offseason News

After tensions flared at the trade deadline last season, SS Jamal Adams expressed his frustrations with a lack of a contract extension on social media before supposedly requesting a trade in June. However, according to Connor Hughes at The Athletic, the Jets still hope to sign Adams to a long-term contract. Reportedly, over half of the teams in the NFL have expressed interest in adding the defensive star, but the Dallas Cowboys have gotten the most traction as a potential trade partner, with La'El Collins and Michael Gallup coming up as potential trade targets. Jamal Adams is still on his rookie contract for 2020, and the Jets accepted his fifth-year option for 2021.
 
Also, this isn't really news, but former Jets' All Pro CB Darrelle Revis continued his spat with 49ers' All Pro Richard Sherman, culminating in this unusual Tweet:
3 facts here.
@RSherman_25
•I’m more handsome than him according to women.
•I’m better at corner than him according to everyone.
•Shutdown corners are paid more than Zone 3 corners which I’m currently still am today.
 

Projected Starting Lineup

Pos 1 2 3 4
off
QB Sam Darnold J Flacco J Morgan
RB Le'Veon Bell F Gore L Perine T Cannon
WR Breshad Perriman J Smith
WR Denzel Mims V Smith
SWR Jamison Crowder B Berrios
TE Chris Herndon R Griffin D Brown
LT Mekhi Becton C Clark
LG Alex Lewis G Van Roten
C Connor McGovern J Harrison
RG Brian Winters
RT George Fant C Edoga
def
EDGE Jordan Jenkins K Phillips
EDGE Tarell Basham J Zuniga
DT Henry Anderson N Shepherd F Fatukasi
DT Quinnen Williams S McLendon
ILB CJ Mosley N Hewitt B Cashman
ILB Avery Williamson P Onwuasor H Langi
CB Pierre Desir B Hall
CB Arthur Maulet Q Wilson
NCB Brian Poole S Carter
SS Jamal Adams A Davis
FS Marcus Maye M Farley
spec
K Sam Ficken
P Braden Mann
LS Thomas Hennessy
 
Roster Bubble (In): RB Trenton Cannon, WR Jeff Smith, ILB Harvey Langi, NCB Shyheim Carter, K Sam Ficken
 
Roster Bubble (Out): WR Josh Doctson, TE Trevon Wesco, LG Josh Andrews, EDGE John Franklin-Myers, CB Blessuan Austin
 

Position Group Strengths and Weaknesses

QB - Neutral/Weakness
Jets fans aren't going to love this one, but Sam Darnold is arguably still a bottom-third passer going into 2020. Darnold has been surrounded by a poor supporting cast over the past two years, including a turnstile of receivers with drop issues across Robby Anderson and linemen with pass-pro issues, but he certainly has not dominated like other young quarterbacks such as Lamar Jackson, Patrick Mahomes, Deshaun Watson, and Carson Wentz. The Jets have a good group behind Darnold, though, including Joe Flacco, who supposedly won't be ready for week 1, and James Morgan, a 4th-round rookie out of FIU.
 
Backfield - Strength
Le'Veon Bell, who is making $15.5 MM this season, is an all-around back in terms of running between the tackles, receiving, and pass protecting. The Jets also signed the ageless wonder Frank Gore to take some of the pressure off of Bell. Joe Douglas also drafted La'Mical Perine to contribute in the backfield.
 
Pass Catchers - Neutral/Weakness
In 2020, the Jets are banking on production from unproved pass catchers who have performed well in limited sample sizes. Joe Douglas signed Breshad Perriman, who had a very productive end to his 2019 season, to man one of the outside receiver spots. He also drafted Denzel Mims out of Baylor to presumably also start as a rookie. Jamison Crowder broke out last year as an above-average slot receiver, and Chris Herndon missed virtually all of last season but played well in his rookie season as a tight end. The receiver depth lacks standout names, with Vyncint Smith as the presumptive WR4, but the tight end depth is strong, with Ryan Griffin returning on a multi-year extension.
 
Offensive Line - Weakness
The Jets entirely remade their offensive line, and while each position is arguably improved on paper, it is still young and unproven. Most significantly, at LT, Joe Douglas drafted Mekhi Becton at 11, who is already a really good run blocker with the tools to grow in pass pro. Douglas also re-signed Alex Lewis, who is probably serviceable but below average, to start at left guard, but he could face competition from 4th-round rookie Cameron Clark. The Jets signed Connor McGovern to start at C, and while he should solidify the position for at least the next two years, he is not extraordinary. Right guard shapes up to be an open competition between incumbent Brian Winters, who is serviceable when healthy, and new acquisition Greg Van Roten. At RT, the Jets signed George Fant, who played mostly as a swing tackle or sixth offensive lineman for Seattle to compete with Chuma Edoga.
 
Defensive Line - Weakness
This is a tough pill to swallow for Jets fans, but the days of Muhammad Wilkerson, and Leonard Williams are over. At EDGE, the Jets have arguably the worst duo in the NFL with Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham presumably playing as starters, with rookie 3rd-round pick Jabari Zuniga and 2019 UDFA Kyle Phillips playing rotationally and John Franklin-Myers competing for snaps. Starting on the interior, the Jets have Quinnen Williams, the former third-overall selection who notched 2.5 sacks and 4 TFLs in his rookie season and was arrested in March on a weapons charge, and Henry Anderson, a nimble interior penetrator who had a breakout year in 2018 before regressing to the mean in 2019. Nathan Shepherd, Steve McLendon, and Foley Fatukasi should all see plenty of tread on the DL, as well.
 
Linebackers - Strength
The Jets had a nearly-comical number of injuries at off-ball linebacker last season, but on paper, the unit appears very strong. CJ Mosley, 2019 FA acquisition, missed almost the entire 2019 season with a groin injury, but when healthy, he is one of the best linebackers in football. Avery Williamson, who projects to start across Mosley in 2020, is a good run defender but missed the entire 2019 year with a torn ACL. Returning starter Neville Hewitt, cheap FA acquisition Patrick Onwuasor, and promising second-year player Blake Cashman could each play in various base or subpackage roles, in addition to on special teams.
 
Secondary - Neutral
Similar to the defensive line, the Jets secondary is a tale of two halves, in this case safeties and cornerbacks. At safety, the Jets have reigning All Pro Jamal Adams and solid free safety Marcus Maye returning, in addition to the versatile 3rd-round pick Ashtyn Davis out of Cal. Outside cornerback is in flux, as new acquisition Pierre Desir should lock up one spot, while Arthur Maulet, Quincy Wilson, 5th-round rookie Bryce Hall, and Blessuan Austin could compete for the other starting spot, with last year's breakout player Brian Poole locking up the slot. Nate Hairston and Shyheim Carter could compete for other key depth roles in the secondary.
 
Special Teams - Strength/Neutral
At kicker, the Jets had a rocky performance last year, so they brought in Brett Maher to compete with last year's starter Sam Ficken. At punter, the Jets have rookie Braden Mann, who handles kickoffs and whose 47.1 yards per punt would have ranked 4th in the NFL last year. At longsnapper, Thomas Hennessy is an asset in coverage and will return in 2020. Additionally, WR Vyncint Smith and FS Matthias Farley project to play major roles in kick coverage next season, with other jobs up for grabs.
 

Schedule Predictions

Week 1 at Buffalo: L - Other than the loss of Shaq Lawson and the additions of Stefon Diggs and AJ Epenesa, the Bills mostly had a quiet offseason, though with encouraging performances from young players in Josh Allen, Ed Oliver, Tremaine Edmunds, and Tre'Davious White and with the team coming off of a 10-6 campaign, there’s a lot about which to be enthusiastic in Buffalo. The Bills, who went 10-6 last year and made the playoffs, beat the Jets here in their home opener. Record: 0-1
 
Week 2 vs San Francisco: L - The 49ers took a huge leap in 2019, marching through the NFC and into the Super Bowl, and the additions of Trent Williams, Brandon Aiyuk, and Javon Kinlaw should keep them competitive in 2020. If Jamal Adams is on the team, he might be able to get in George Kittle's way, but nevertheless the 49ers should be one of the NFL's most well-rounded football teams, and so it would be difficult to envision the Jets winning in week 2. Record: 0-2
 
Week 3 at Indianapolis: L - The Colts had a big free agency period, signing Philip Rivers and adding DeForest Buckner in a trade while retaining their entire offensive line. While the Jets went 7-9 last season, just like the Colts did, the Colts probably are the favorites to win at home, especially with the advantage that the Indianapolis offensive line should have over the New York pass rush. Record: 0-3
 
Week 4 vs Denver: L - While the Broncos went 7-9 last season, they have championship aspirations in 2020, as they went 4-1 in Drew Lock's starts last year and added Melvin Gordon, Jerry Jeudy, KJ Hamler, and Albert Okwuegbunam to a group of weapons already containing Philip Lindsay, Courtland Sutton, Noah Fant, and Jeff Heuerman while retaining defensive stars in Von Miller, AJ Johnson, and Justin Simmons. Though it is a home game, the Jets should be seen as heavy underdogs in week 4. Record: 0-4
 
Week 5 vs Arizona: W - The Cardinals look poised to improve in 2020, with the additions of DeAndre Hopkins, Jordan Phillips, and Isaiah Simmons, but questions remain with the offensive line and defensive line, in addition to with the poor playcalling from Kingsbury and Joseph at times during last season. This could be a key game for Quinnen Williams, Henry Anderson, Steve McLendon, and the interior defensive line to feast on a poor Cardinals' interior offensive line and for Gregg Williams to outmatch Kingsbury and Murray at home. Record: 1-4
 
Week 6 at LA Chargers: L - The Chargers revamped their team this offseason, adding Justin Herbert in the draft and surrounding him with Bryan Bulaga, Trai Turner, and Joe Reed on offense and Kenneth Murray and Chris Harris on defense. Though the quarterback situation is in flux in LA, it’s unlikely that the Jets will go on the road to the West Coast and beat an otherwise well-rounded team. Record: 1-5
 
Week 7 vs Buffalo: W - The Jets have beat the Bills at least once in 8 of the last 10 seasons, and so the Jets should have a shot to win one at home. Record: 2-5
 
Week 8 at Kansas City: L - The Chiefs has a pretty quiet offseason aside from locking up Patrick Mahomes and Chris Jones on long-term deals, as they added Mike Remmers, Taco Charlton, Willie Gay, and Lucas Niang while losing Stefen Wisniewski, Emmanuel Ogbah, Reggie Ragland, and Kendall Fuller. Despite the offseason losses, Reid and Mahomes should easily be able to storm past the Jets at home. Record: 2-6
 
Week 9 vs New England: W - The Patriots took a hit this offseason, obviously headlined by the loss of Tom Brady but also supplemented by key defensive losses in Kyle Van Noy, Jamie Collins, and Duron Harmon in addition to a general lack of attention towards improving a lackluster wide receiver corps. The Jets haven't beat the Patriots since their week 16 overtime thriller in 2015, but a November home game could be a good chance to do it, as the Patriots don't really possess the weapons to exploit issues with the Jets' cornerbacks nor the pass rush to exploit issues with the Jets' offensive line. Record: 3-6
 
Week 10 at Miami: W - The Dolphins had a very poor 2019, finishing 5-11 with the 27th-ranked total offense and the 30th-ranked total defense, and as such they had an incredibly busy offseason, adding Matt Breida, Ereck Flowers, Ted Karras, Kyle Van Noy, Shaq Lawson, Emmanuel Ogbah, Elandon Roberts, and Byron Jones in free agency and Tua Tagovailoa, Austin Jackson, Noah Igbinoghene, Robert Hunt, Raekwon Davis, and Solomon Kindley in the draft. However, in Miami before the bye would be a good chance for Adam Gase to get a revenge game win, seeing as the Dolphins still have weaknesses all over their roster including quarterback, offensive tackle, and edge rusher. Record: 4-6
 
WEEK 11 BYE
 
Week 12 vs Miami: L - With all their offseason additions, the Dolphins figure to match up fairly evenly with the Jets in 2020, and so it's likely that the two teams will split the season series. Record: 4-7
 
Week 13 vs Las Vegas: W - The Raiders had a very busy offseason, adding Jason Witten, Maliek Collins, Nick Kwiatkoski, Prince Amukamara, and Damarious Randall in free agency and Henry Ruggs, Damon Arnette, Lynn Bowden, Bryan Edwards, and Amik Robertson in the draft with their only major losses being Darryl Worley and Karl Joseph. At home against a West Coast opponent, the Jets would be wise to take advantage of some of the Raiders’ weaknesses in this game, including inexperience at wide receiver, edge rusher, linebacker, and cornerback. Record: 5-7
 
Week 14 at Seattle: L - The Seahawks went 11-5 last season and were one play away from securing the top seed in the NFC, so their offseason was pretty quiet, mostly focusing on the offensive line with the losses of Germain Ifedi, DJ Fluker, and George Fant and the additions of free agents Brandon Shell, BJ Finney, and Cedric Ogbuehi, and draft pick Damien Lewis. Pete Carroll is one of the best coaches in football today, and in this late-season matchup at Seattle he’ll have the personnel advantage against the Jets offense, which lacks talented weapons and blockers. Record: 5-8
 
Week 15 at LA Rams: L - The Rams regressed to 9-7 last year and then had a difficult offseason, losing Todd Gurley, Brandin Cooks, Dante Fowler, and Nickell Robey-Coleman, with their only major addition being A’Shawn Robinson. The 2020 Rams are not the Super Bowl Rams of the past, but with both McVay and Goff still on board, the Rams have to be favorites to take this late-season home game against the Jets. Record: 5-9
 
Week 16 vs Cleveland: W - The Browns had a busy offseason, hiring head coach Kevin Stefanski, losing Greg Robinson, Joe Schobert, and Damarious Randall, signing Austin Hooper, Jack Conklin, Andrew Billings, Karl Joseph, and Damarious Randall, and drafting Jedrick Wills, Grant Delpit, and Jacob Phillips. Despite these additions, however, Cleveland still has a new, inexperienced offensive playcaller at head coach and a question mark at quarterback, and Gregg Williams generally handles quarterbacks who struggle with post-snap reads well with disguised coverages and aggressive blitz packages. Record: 6-9
 
Week 17 at New England: L - With the expanded playoffs, the Patriots have an even greater chance to make the postseason this year than they otherwise would, so this late-season match in Foxborough could be a consequential, divisional-revenge game for New England. Record: 6-10
 
Final Record: 6-10
While I firmly believe that the Jets improved significantly this offseason, especially in terms of the offensive line and getting players back from injury, this year’s schedule is substantially more difficult that last year’s, which could result in less games in the wins column for 2020. Last year, the Jets closed out the back-half of their season going 6-2 playing against rookie Daniel Jones, rookie Dwayne Haskins, Carr, Dalton, Fitzpatrick, Lamar Jackson, rookie Devlin Hodges, and Matt Barkley, and this year the Jets have to play both the AFC West and the NFC West, which is a jump in competition level.
 

Training Camp Battles

WR #2: Denzel Mims vs Vyncint Smith
Jets fans would hope that starting receiver isn’t much of a battle, but since rookie wideouts traditionally are been known to take longer learning the playbook, the other receiver spot next to Perriman and Crowder is in flux. Denzel Mims, the rookie receiver from Baylor, is the odds-on favorite to get a starting role and to play as a deep threat and red-zone threat in year one. However, if Mims proves to be too raw off the bat, the Jets could fall back on Vyncint Smith, who had 17 receptions last year and showed his value as a deep threat.
 
Left Guard: Alex Lewis vs Cameron Clark
Following a 2019 season where Alex Lewis spot-started in place of Kelechi Osemele, the Jets rewarded him with a 3 year, $18.6 MM contract, and he goes into 2020 as the favorite to start at left guard once again. With that being said, the possibility exists that rookie tackle Cameron Clark out of Charlotte will kick inside and compete at left guard.
 
Right Guard: Brian Winters vs Greg Van Roten
After a 2019 season in which Brian Winters went down with a shoulder injury in week 10, many expected the Jets to cut him, but he instead will return as the incumbent starter at right guard. However, new free agent acquisition Greg Van Roten could switch to the right side and compete against Winters to start.
 
Right Tackle: George Fant vs Chuma Edoga
After the Jets had a poor performance form their offensive line in 2019, GM Joe Douglas brought in competition at all position, including at right tackle. George Fant, former Seattle swing tackle, is the presumptive favorite to land the starting job, despite his lack of starting experience. Chuma Edoga could compete as well, but his performance in both run blocking and pass pro was so shaky last year that he needed extensive help from tight ends.
 
EDGE #2: Tarell Basham vs Kyle Phillips vs Jabari Zuniga vs John Franklin-Myers
The Jets started Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham at edge rusher last season, so it was somewhat of a shock to see them add absolutely no outside talent until the middle of the third round, and so now Gregg Williams and the defensive staff are forced to make the pitiful decision between starting Basham, Kyle Phillips, Jabari Zuniga, or John Franklin-Myers across from Jenkins. Basham, who the Jets claimed off waivers in 2018, is the odds-on favorite to start once again after only notching 2 sacks and 4 quarterback hits in 54% of the Jets' defensive snaps. Kyle Phillips, the second-year player from Tennessee who was a five-star high-school recruit, is a thicker lineman best suited to play on run downs who could push for starting snaps as well. Jabari Zuniga, 3rd-round rookie out of Florida, is a third contender for the starting job, but his interior versatility and similarity to Jenkins in terms of his stiffness and poor pad level could suggest the Jets envision him in more of a rotational role. Franklin-Myers, a large and athletic pass rusher who missed last season with an undisclosed injury after the Jets claimed him off waivers from the Rams, could compete for a large snap share with a strong camp.
 
DT #2: Henry Anderson vs Nathan Shepherd
This battle won't get much media coverage, as both Anderson and Shepherd project to get plenty of tread on the New York defensive line, but nevertheless the two will compete in training camp for the upper hand in the snap count. Henry Anderson, incumbent starter and penetrating defensive lineman, saw his production fall off a bit in 2019, in part due to a nagging shoulder injury. Nathan Shepherd saw his role increase in the back half of the season after a suspension sidelined him from weeks two through eight, and with a good camp, he could establish himself as the primary nimble-footed complement to the heftier, run-stopping trio of Williams, McLendon, and Fatukasi.
 
CB #2: Arthur Maulet vs Quincy Wilson vs Bryce Hall vs Blessuan Austin
The outside cornerback spot across from Pierre Desir is probably the most open starting battle on the team. Arthur Maulet, the undersized but physical cornerback out of Memphis, is probably the favorite to start after outplaying Johnson and Roberts last season to win the left cornerback job. Quincy Wilson, the former second-round pick, should be Maulet's primary competition after the Jets traded a draft pick to acquire him from the Colts. Bryce Hall, the rookie 5th-round corner from Virginia, is a darkhorse to start as well if he is healthy to start the season. Blessuan Austin, the former 6th-round pick, might factor into the competition, but he'll have to climb out of Gregg Williams' doghouse after reacting poorly to his week-16 benching last season.
 
Kicker: Sam Ficken vs Brett Maher
Sam Ficken, who hit 70% of his kicks last season, will compete with Brett Maher, who hit 67% of his kicks last season, for the starting kicker job, but neither candidate should have to handle kickoffs with rookie punter Braden Mann in the fold.
 

Offensive and Defensive Schemes

Adam Gase, head coach and offensive playcaller for the Jets, runs a zone-blocking, short-passing offense mostly out of 11 personnel while also mixing in some 2-TE sets. In the run game, Gase is willing to run gap concepts based on his offensive line personnel, but he favors his inside zone running playcalls. In the pass game, Gase likes to stack his receivers, throw checkdowns, split his backs out wide, and utilize the sidelines.
 
Gregg Williams, defensive coordinator for the Jets, runs a 3-4 hybrid, blitz-heavy defense with an emphasis on zone coverage. In the front seven, Williams has used both 3-4 and 4-3 base packages, though he mostly uses nickel fronts and one-gapping penetration schemes. In the secondary, Williams stresses MOFC shells, press-zone concepts, and disguised coverages and blitzes.
 
Huge thanks to u/PlatypusOfDeath for running this series.
Link to hub
submitted by PM-ME-A-PRIME-NUMBER to nfl [link] [comments]


2020.07.19 17:24 PM-ME-A-PRIME-NUMBER r/NFL Offseason Review — 2020 NY Jets

New York Jets

Division: AFC East
 
1 New England Patriots (12-4)
2 Buffalo Bills (10-6)
3 New York Jets (7-9)
4 Miami Dolphins (5-11)
 

Coaching Changes

The Jets did not make any major coaching changes this offseason, retaining HC Adam Gase, OC Dowell Loggains, and DC Gregg Williams.
 

Free Agency

Players Lost/Cut
Player Position New Team
Trevor Siemian QB Free Agent
Bilal Powell RB Free Agent
Ty Montgomery RB New Orleans
Robby Anderson WR Carolina
Demaryius Thomas WR Free Agent
Kelvin Beachum LT Free Agent
Brent Qvale LG Houston
Ryan Kalil C Free Agent
Tom Compton RG San Francisco
Brandon Shell RT Seattle
Brandon Copeland EDGE New England
Paul Worrilow ILB Free Agent
Albert McClellan ILB Free Agent
Trumaine Johnson CB Free Agent
Darryl Roberts FS Detroit
Rontez Miles FS Free Agent
Blake Countess DB Free Agent
Lachlan Edwards P Free Agent
 
The Jets reshaped their weapons for Sam Darnold this offseason, losing three veterans and bringing in a number of free agents and draft picks. GM Joe Douglas opted not to re-sign RB Bilal Powell who the Jets drafted in 2011, and he remains a free agent. Most significantly, Douglas allowed his top offensive weapon in WR Robby Anderson to walk to Carolina on a 2 year, $20.0 MM deal, creating a void at outside receiver. The team has also not re-signed WR Demaryius Thomas, who filled in for Quincy Enunwa last season, and he remains a free agent.
 
The biggest change that the Jets made to their personnel this offseason was along the offensive line, and as such there were a number of veteran casualties. LT Kelvin Beachum started for the Jets from 2017 to 2019, but he seems to have regressed, and he remains a free agent. The Jets also let C Ryan Kalil go, who unretired to snap for Sam Darnold last offseason but disappointed and got injured, and he remains a free agent. RG Tom Compton was forced into action last season with the injury to Brian Winters, and he, as is characteristic of his NFL career thus far, struggled massively in run blocking and pass pro, but he projects to compete anyway next year for San Francisco on a 1 year deal. Joe Douglas and Adam Gase never expressed interest in RT Brandon Shell for the long term, benching him for the raw Chuma Edoga early in 2019, so it was not a surprise to see the Jets let Shell go to start for Seattle on a 2 year contract.
 
The Jets mostly kept their defense in tact this offseason, only losing two key pieces. EDGE Brandon Copeland left for New England on a 1 year contract, which is not a surprising location, as Copeland is a great utility player, functioning as a rush linebacker, an off-ball linebacker, and a core special teamer for the Jets in 2019. Similarly, Joe Douglas has not re-signed the versatile FS Rontez Miles, who has played single-high safety, box safety, and a key special teams role during his seven-year Jets tenure, and he remains a free agent.
 
The Jets cut CB Trumaine Johnson, which was virtually a no-brainer after two injury-plagued seasons in which his lack of speed was frequently exposed. The only real decision was whether to cut Johnson immediately, which would have resulted in a $12.0 MM dead cap hit in 2020, or to designate Johnson as a post-June 1 cut, which would have resulted in a $4.0 MM dead cap hit in 2020 and a $8.0 MM dead cap hit in 2021. Joe Douglas opted for the latter, meaning that the Jets saved a total of $11.0 MM by cutting Johnson in 2020. Grade: A
 
The Jets cut FS Darryl Roberts in mid-March. The Jets had high hopes for Roberts following the 2018 season, prompting them to sign him to a three-year contract with an out after one year. Roberts had a rocky first eight games of the season at cornerback before injuring his calf and being benched in favor of Maulet, Austin, and Canady. Roberts remained a special-teams asset and good safety depth in December, but ultimately GM Joe Douglas decided he could cut Roberts, save $6.0 MM, and look elsewhere for a replacement. Grade: B
 
Players Signed
Player Position Old Team Length Salary
Joe Flacco QB Denver 1 year $1.5 MM
David Fales QB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Frank Gore RB Buffalo 1 year $1.1 MM
Breshad Perriman WR Tampa Bay 1 year $6.5 MM
Josh Doctson WR Minnesota 1 year $0.9 MM
Daniel Brown TE NY Jets 1 year $0.8 MM
Alex Lewis LG NY Jets 3 years $18.6 MM
Greg Van Roten LG Carolina 3 years $10.5 MM
Josh Andrews LG Indianapolis 1 year $1.0 MM
Connor McGovern C Denver 3 years $27.0 MM
George Fant RT Seattle 3 years $27.3 MM
Jordan Jenkins EDGE NY Jets 1 year $3.9 MM
Neville Hewitt ILB NY Jets 1 year $2.0 MM
Patrick Onwuasor ILB Baltimore 1 year $2.0 MM
James Burgess ILB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Pierre Desir CB Indianapolis 1 year $4.0 MM
Arthur Maulet CB NY Jets 1 year $0.9 MM
Quincy Wilson CB Indianapolis 1 year $1.3 MM
Bennett Jackson FS NY Jets 1 year $0.7 MM
Brian Poole DB NY Jets 1 year $5.0 MM
 
Jets GM Joe Douglas used to work in Baltimore, where he was supposedly very influential in the decision to draft QB Joe Flacco, so this signing is far from surprising. While Joe Flacco may be trending down in his play, $1.5 MM feels like a bargain for the chance at solid veteran insurance for Sam Darnold. However, his neck surgery will supposedly keep him out for the opening of the season. Grade: B
 
After the draft, the Jets signed RB Frank Gore to a 1 year, $1.1 MM deal to ensure that he will play his 16th season in green and white. Gore is a physical back who played under Jets HC Adam Gase in San Francisco in 2008 and in Miami in 2018. Gore can take some of the pressure off of starting RB Le'Veon Bell in 2020 as the Jets move towards a "runningback by committee" system. Grade: B
 
The Jets-Ravens connection proved strong again with the signing of WR Breshad Perriman. Perriman was a first-round pick for the Ravens in 2015 while current Jets' Director of Player Personnel Chad Alexander was with Baltimore, and though he never really produced at a high level there, he had a resurgence in 2019 for the Buccaneers. Especially in November and December, where he performed at a 1000-yard rate projected over a whole season, Perriman proved to be a legitimate outside option across from Mike Evans with Chris Godwin in the slot. Perriman is a big, athletic receiver who projects to be well-worth the $6.5 MM deal to start on the outside. Grade: B
 
Yet again, the Jets signed a former Ravens player, re-signing LG Alex Lewis, who played 2016 through 2018 with Baltimore before GM Joe Douglas traded for him in the 2019 offseason. Lewis stepped in for Kelechi Osemele last season and was a serviceable starter. Lewis is good in pass pro, versatile, and a good zone fit as a guard. However, Lewis could touch up on his penalties and overall run blocking for 2020. GM Joe Douglas only gave Lewis a 3 year, $18.6 MM deal which actually has an out after 1 year, which seems like a solid price to get another look at a 28-year-old guard who might be part of the team's future. Grade: B
 
The Jets' biggest free-agent singing in 2020 in terms of guaranteed money was former Broncos' C Connor McGovern at $18.0 MM. McGovern is an athletic lineman with experience at guard and center. He is a powerful center, and that serves him well in the run game. However, McGovern has a weak anchor and inconsistent pad level and leverage in the pass game. For this reason, despite the need at center, Joe Douglas' decision to commit two years to a center who is, perhaps, below average in pass pro is worthy of scrutiny. Grade: C
 
The biggest heavily-scrutinized acquisition that the Jets made in 2020 was probably signing former Seahawks RT George Fant to a 3 year, $27.3 MM contract. Fant functioned primarily as a swing tackle and as a sixth offensive lineman in Seattle, as he could not see the field as a starter over Germain Ifedi. Fant remains a very raw pass protector in terms of his anchor and the fluidity of his kickslide, and his ability in the run is only theoretically a strength in zone blocking. While Fant's contract has an out in 2021, it is a bit strange to see him making a similar salary to Bryan Bulaga and Halapoulvaati Vaitai. Grade: D
 
The Jets were patient in re-signing their own free agents, which probably helped get good value retaining EDGE Jordan Jenkins. Despite notching 15 combined sacks over the past two seasons, Jenkins only got $3.9 MM from the Jets. The sack number is a bit misleading, though, due to a high quantity of "coverage sacks" and a relatively modest pressure rate. However, Jenkins is a fine run defender, and he'll slot in as EDGE #1 again for the bets in 2020. Grade: B
 
The Jets also acquired a former Raven on defense with LB Patrick Onwuasor, and they only paid $2.0 MM to bring him in. Onwuasor is an undersized linebacker but a good linear athlete, and while he struggles reading offensive cues and getting off of blocks to stop the run, he is a really good coverage player with the ability to get home as a pass rusher. Onwuasor has played next to CJ Mosley before, and he could potentially contribute in subpackage and base 4-3 looks, in addition to in a depth capacity and on special teams. Grade: B
 
With the cuts of Trumaine Johnson and Darryl Roberts, GM Joe Douglas decided to fill a starting cornerback spot with former Colts CB Pierre Desir on a 1 year, prove-it deal. Desir lacks longspeed, but he is a long, physical corner with decent short-area quickness. However, Desir lacks refinement in press and zone. With that said, $4.0 MM is a reasonable price to get a fill-in outside cornerback in 2020. Grade: B
 
This signing probably didnt get much national coverage, but re-signing CB Arthur Maulet could pay huge dividends for the Jets in 2020. In 2019, Trumaine Johnson and Darryl Roberts failed to hit expectations, forcing Maulet, Nate Hairston, and rookie Blessuan Austin into the outside cornerback rotation. Maulet is the only one of that group who was not benched for performance reasons. For a mere $0.9 MM, retaining a guy in Maulet who is familiar with the defense who will compete to start in 2020 is seemingly a no-brainer. Grade: A
 
Instead of making another draft choice, the Jets decided to trade pick 211 for former Colts CB Quincy Wilson. Wilson, a former second-round pick, was a raw prospect coming out of Florida, and his penalties and lack of zone instincts followed him to the pros and led to his benching. However, Wilson is a big, long, and athletic corner, and at only 23 years of age, it makes sense that GM Joe Douglas wants to bring him on board to compete in an iffy cornerback room. Grade: C
 
This signing went somewhat under-the-radar, but Jets fans were thrilled when the team retained DB Brian Poole to man the slot on a 1 year, $5.0 MM contract. Poole is a good run defender with an ability to rush the passer, and he had a career year in coverage in 2019. Brian Poole is a good fit for Gregg Williams' defense, so retaining him to start in 2020 for a mere $5.0 MM seems to be a good value. Grade: B
 

Draft

Round Number Pos Player School
1 11 LT Mekhi Becton Louisville
2 59 WR Denzel Mims Baylor
3 68 FS Ashtyn Davis California
3 79 EDGE Jabari Zuniga Florida
4 120 RB La'Mical Perine Florida
4 125 QB James Morgan FIU
4 129 LT Cameron Clark Charlotte
5 158 CB Bryce Hall Virginia
6 191 P Braden Mann Texas A&M
 
The eleventh pick, Louisville T Mekhi Becton, was my favorite acquisition that the Jets made during the 2020 offseason. While there were other options on the board, namely Tristan Wirfs, Henry Ruggs, and Ceedee Lamb, that the Jets presumably could have considered, Becton was the exact player I thought the Jets should take when he fell to 11. The first thing that stands out about Becton is his massive size, as he's 6'7", 364 lbs, with a monstrous 83-inch wingspan. Becton, however, is much more than a heavy lineman, as he defies the norm with his exceptional 5.1-flat movement skills. Becton is a hulking run blocker who is inexperienced but a fluid mover in pass pro. Becton projects to replace Kelvin Beachum and slide in at left tackle immediately in his rookie season. Grade: A
 
Wanting to add more picks to build the Jets in his image in his first year as GM, Joe Douglas opted to move down from 48 to 59 in the second round. This was a costly move, as it caused the Jets to miss out on AJ Epenesa and Darrell Taylor, but the Jets managed to grab a falling Senior Bowl standout in Baylor WR Denzel Mims. Mims is a height-weight-speed freak with good length, hands, and run-blocking toughness. Mims should slot in as a starting outside receiver across from Breshad Perriman in year one. Grade: B
 
The Jets' first third-round pick of 2020 was a real surprise to many fans, as although the team already had arguably the best safety tandem in football with Jamal Adams and Marcus Maye, the Jets drafted California FS Ashytn Davis with the 68th-overall draft selection. Davis is a freak athlete who played single-high safety, box safety, and even slot cornerback at Cal and would almost definitely have been drafted significantly higher but for teams' inability to medically check his groin post-surgery. It's possible that Gregg Williams will utilize Davis as a big nickel defender this year, but this selection could also give the Jets flexibility if Marcus Maye, who is a free agent in 2021, or Jamal Adams, with whom the Jets are supposedly far apart on a long-term contract, depart. Grade: B
 
Despite having a starting EDGE tandem consisting of Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham and losing Brandon Copeland to New England, the Jets did not add outside talent to the position group before the draft, forcing GM Joe Douglas to pick Florida EDGE Jabari Zuniga at 79 overall. Zuniga is a good linear athlete with a decent ability to set the edge and with some interior versatility, and he could maybe project to replace Jordan Jenkins as a starter in 2021. However, Zuniga struggles with stiff hips and slow reaction time at the snap, and plus he missed most of the 2019 season with ankle injuries. The Jets probably hit the right position with Zuniga, who should factor into the pass-rush rotation with Jenkins, Basham, and 2019 UDFA Kyle Phillips, but it's really hard to justify drafting Zuniga with guys like Jonathan Greenard, Terrell Lewis, and DJ Wonnum still on the board. Grade: C
 
With his first day-3 selection as GM, Joe Douglas chose Florida RB La'Mical Perine. Perine is a physical runner with some receiving versatility out of the backfield. However, Perine doesn't really offer very much in terms of speed or vision, and drafting a RB instead of going offensive line, pass rush, receiver, or cornerback when Le'Veon Bell was already in the fold was a curious move. Grade: D
 
The second of the Jets' fourth-round picks probably stirred up the most intrigue, as most casual fans probably didn't expect the Jets to draft a quarterback. With that said, the Jets have gone a combined 0-6 over the past two seasons in games that Darnold did not start, and at this time David Fales was slated to be the backup quarterback, so drafting FIU QB James Morgan in the fourth round, which I thought was a value anyway, was a good choice. Morgan is a thick quarterback with a live arm with developmental quarterback potential. Grade: B
 
With their third pick in the fourth round, the Jets chose a player with the potential to start soon on the offensive line in Charlotte T Cameron Clark. Clark is a powerful lineman who started at left tackle in his rSo, rJr, and rSr seasons and has good short-area quickness despite his 5.29 forty. Some have floated Cameron Clark as a potential convert to guard for the Jets due to his sloppy pass-pro footwork. Grade: B
 
The Jets went corner in round 5, taking Virginia CB Bryce Hall at 158 overall. Hall is a long, tall corner who moves well, has zone instincts, and contributes in the run game. However, Hall's struggles in press and off-man coverage schemes probably project him better as a safety in the NFL rather than as a corner, which doesn't seem to be a need with Adams, Maye, and Davis already on the roster, and Hall's ankle injury prevented him from working out at the Combine, leaving teams in a state of uncertainty about his health and his testing numbers. Grade: C
 
With their sixth-round pick, the Jets went special teams with Texas A&M P Braden Mann. Mann has a big leg and can handle kickoff duties. Mann projects to replace Lachlan Edwards, but this may have been a tad high for a punter. Grade: C
 
The Jets had an intriguing undrafted free agent class with a number of guys who warranted day-3 draft consideration, but two guys that I liked pre-draft stood out as being worth mentioning. Georgia WR Lawrence Cager is a physical receiver at the line of scrimmage who will attempt to make the team as a redzone threat. Alabama DB Shyheim Carter played the STAR role in Nick Saban's defense, and he proved his versatility as a college approximation of a subpackage linebacker, a nickel corner, a box safety, and even a high safety, so he'll vie to make the team as a versatile depth defensive back and as a special-teams ace.
 

Other Offseason News

After tensions flared at the trade deadline last season, SS Jamal Adams expressed his frustrations with a lack of a contract extension on social media before supposedly requesting a trade in June. However, according to Connor Hughes at The Athletic, the Jets still hope to sign Adams to a long-term contract. Reportedly, over half of the teams in the NFL have expressed interest in adding the defensive star, but the Dallas Cowboys have gotten the most traction as a potential trade partner, with RT La'El Collins and WR Michael Gallup coming up as potential trade pieces. Jamal Adams is still on his rookie contract for 2020, and the Jets accepted his fifth-year option for 2021.
 
Also, this isn't really news, but former Jets' All-Pro CB Darrelle Revis continued his spat with 49ers' All-Pro CB Richard Sherman, culminating in this unusual Tweet:
3 facts here.
@RSherman_25
•I’m more handsome than him according to women.
•I’m better at corner than him according to everyone.
•Shutdown corners are paid more than Zone 3 corners which I’m currently still am today.
 

Projected Starting Lineup

QB: Sam Darnold
RB: Le’Veon Bell (and Frank Gore)
WR: Breshad Perriman, Denzel Mims
SWR: Jamison Crowder
TE: Chris Herndon (and Ryan Griffin)
LT: Mekhi Becton
LG: Alex Lewis
C: Connor McGovern
RG: Brian Winters
RT: George Fant
EDGE: Jordan Jenkins, Tarell Basham
DT: Henry Anderson, Quinnen Williams (and Steve McLendon)
ILB: CJ Mosley, Avery Williamson (and Patrick Onwuasor)
CB: Pierre Desir, Arthur Maulet
NCB: Brian Poole
SS: Jamal Adams
FS: Marcus Maye
K: Sam Ficken
P: Braden Mann
LS: Thomas Hennessy
 

Position Group Strengths and Weaknesses

QB - Neutral/Weakness
Jets fans aren't going to love this one, but Sam Darnold is arguably still a bottom-third passer going into 2020. Darnold has been surrounded by a poor supporting cast over the past two years, including a turnstile of receivers across Robby Anderson with drop issues and linemen with pass-pro issues, but he certainly has not dominated like other young quarterbacks such as Lamar Jackson, Patrick Mahomes, Deshaun Watson, and Carson Wentz. The Jets have a good group behind Darnold, though, including Joe Flacco, who said he won't be ready for week 1, and James Morgan, a fourth-round rookie out of FIU.
 
Backfield - Strength
Le'Veon Bell, who is making $15.5 MM this season, is an all-around back in terms of running between the tackles, receiving, and pass protecting. The Jets also signed the ageless wonder Frank Gore to take some of the pressure off of Bell. Joe Douglas also drafted La'Mical Perine to contribute in the backfield.
 
Pass Catchers - Neutral/Weakness
In 2020, the Jets are banking on production from unproved pass catchers who have performed well in limited sample sizes. Joe Douglas signed Breshad Perriman, who had a very productive end to his 2019 season, to man one of the outside receiver spots. He also drafted Denzel Mims out of Baylor to presumably also start as a rookie. Jamison Crowder broke out last year as an above-average slot receiver, and Chris Herndon missed virtually all of last season but played well in his rookie season as a tight end. The receiver depth lacks standout names, but the tight end depth is strong, with Ryan Griffin returning on a multi-year extension.
 
Offensive Line - Weakness
The Jets entirely remade their offensive line, and while each position is arguably improved on paper, it is still young and unproven. Most significantly, at LT, Joe Douglas drafted Mekhi Becton at 11, who is already a really good run blocker with the tools to grow in pass pro. Douglas also re-signed Alex Lewis, who is probably serviceable but below average, to start at left guard, but he could force competition from fourth-round rookie Cameron Clark. The Jets signed Connor McGovern to start at C, and while he should solidify the position for at least the last two years, he is not extraordinary. Right guard shapes up to be an open competition between incumbent Brian Winters, who is serviceable when healthy, and new acquisition Greg Van Roten. At RT, the Jets signed George Fant, who played mostly as a swing tackle or sixth offensive lineman for Seattle but certainly has the athletic ability to outperform Chuma Edoga from last year.
 
Defensive Line - Weakness
This might be surprising to the non-Jets fans, but the days of Muhammad Wilkerson, and Leonard Williams are over, and pressure from the defensive line probably won't come easily for Gang Green. At EDGE, the Jets have arguably the worst duo in the NFL with Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham presumably playing as starters, with rookie 3rd-round pick Jabari Zuniga and 2019 UDFA Kyle Phillips playing rotationally. Starting on the interior, the Jets have Quinnen Williams, the former third-overall selection who notched 2.5 sacks and 4 TFLs in his rookie season and was arrested in March on a weapons charge, and Henry Anderson, a nimble interior penetrator who had a breakout year in 2018 before coming back down to Earth in 2019. Nathan Shepherd, Steve McLendon, and Foley Fatukasi should all see plenty of tread on the DL, as well.
 
Linebackers - Strength
The Jets had a nearly-comical number of injuries at off-ball linebacker last season, but on paper, the unit appears very strong. CJ Mosley, 2019 FA acquisition, missed almost the entire 2019 season with a groin injury, but when healthy, he is one of the best linebackers in football. Avery Williamson, who projects to start across Mosley in 2020, is a good run defender but missed the entire 2019 year with a torn ACL. Returning starter Neville Hewitt, cheap FA acquisition Patrick Onwuasor, and promising second-year player Blake Cashman could each play in various base or subpackage roles, in addition to on special teams.
 
Secondary - Neutral
Similar to the defensive line, the Jets secondary is a tale of two halves, in this case safeties and cornerbacks. At safety, the Jets have reigning All Pro Jamal Adams and solid free safety Marcus Maye returning, in addition to the versatile 3rd-round pick Ashtyn Davis out of Cal. Outside cornerback is in flux, as new acquisition Pierre Desir should lock up one spot, while Arthur Maulet, Quincy Wilson, and Blessuan Austin could compete for the other starting spot, with last year's breakout player Brian Poole locking up the slot. Nate Hairston, Javelin Guidry, Shyheim Carter, and 5th-round rookie Bryce Hall could compete for other key depth roles in the secondary.
 
Special Teams - Strength/Neutral
At kicker, the Jets had a rocky performance last year, so they brought in Brett Maher, who hit 67% of his field goals last season, to compete with Sam Ficken, who hit 70% of his field goals last season. At punter, the Jets have rookie P Braden Mann, who handles kickoffs and whose 47.1 yards per punt would have ranked 4th in the NFL last year. At longsnapper, Thomas Hennessy is an asset in coverage and will return in 2020. Additionally, WR Vyncint Smith and FS Matthias Farley project to play major roles in kick coverage next season, with other jobs presumably up for grabs.
 

Schedule Predictions

Week 1 at Buffalo: L - Other than the loss of Shaq Lawson and the additions of Stephon Diggs and AJ Epenesa, the Bills mostly had a quiet offseason, though with encouraging performances from young players in Josh Allen, Ed Oliver, Tremaine Edmunds, and Tre'Davious White and coming off of a 10-6 campaign, there’s a lot about which to be enthusiastic in Buffalo. The Bills, who went 10-6 last year and made the playoffs, beat the Jets here in their home opener. Record: 0-1
 
Week 2 vs San Francisco: L - The 49ers took a huge leap in 2019, marching through the NFC and into the Super Bowl, and the additions of Brandon Aiyuk, Javon Kinlaw, and Trent Williams should keep them competitive in 2020. If Jamal Adams is on the team, he might be able to get in George Kittle's way, but nevertheless the 49ers should be one of the NFL's most well-rounded football teams, and it would be difficult to envision the Jets defeating them. Record: 0-2
 
Week 3 at Indianapolis: L - The Colts had a big free agency period, signing Philip Rivers and adding DeForest Buckner in a trade while retaining their entire offensive line. While the Jets went 7-9 last season, just like the Colts did, the Colts probably are the favorites to win at home, especially with the advantage the Indianapolis offensive line should have over the New York pass rush. Record: 0-3
 
Week 4 vs Denver: L - While the Broncos went 7-9 last season, they have championship aspirations in 2020, as they went 4-1 in Drew Lock's starts last year and added Melvin Gordon, Jerry Jeudy, KJ Hamler, and Albert Okwuegbunam to a group of weapons already containing Philip Lindsay, Courtland Sutton, Noah Fant, and Jeff Heuerman while retaining defensive stars in Von Miller, AJ Johnson, and Justin Simmons. Though it is a home game, it's hard to imagine the Jets defeating the Broncos in 2020. Record: 0-4
 
Week 5 vs Arizona: W - The Cardinals look poised to improve in 2020, with the additions of DeAndre Hopkins, Jordan Phillips, and Isaiah Simmons, but questions remain with the offensive line and defensive line, in addition to with the poor playcalling from Kingsbury and Joseph at times during last season. This could be a key game for Quinnen Williams, Henry Anderson, Steve McLendon, and the interior defensive line to feast on a poor Cardinals' interior offensive line, and for Gregg Williams to outmatch Kingsbury and Murray at home. Record: 1-4
 
Week 6 at LA Chargers: L - The Chargers revamped their team this offseason, adding Justin Herbert in the draft and surrounding him with Bryan Bulaga, Trai Turner, and Joe Reed on offense, and Kenneth Murray and Chris Harris on defense. Though the quarterback situation is in flux in LA, it’s a bit hard to envision the Jets going on the road to the West Coast and beating an otherwise well-rounded team. Record: 1-5
 
Week 7 vs Buffalo: W - The Jets have beat the Bills at least once in 8 of the last 10 seasons, and so the Jets should have a good chance to win one at home. Record: 2-5
 
Week 8 at Kansas City: L - The Chiefs has a pretty quiet offseason aside from locking up Patrick Mahomes and Chris Jones on long-term deals, as they added Mike Remmers, Taco Charlton, Willie Gay, and Lucas Niang while losing Stefen Wisniewski, Emmanuel Ogbah, Reggie Ragland, and Kendall Fuller. Despite the offseason losses, Reid and Mahomes should easily be able to storm past the Jets at home. Record: 2-6
 
Week 9 vs New England: W - The Patriots took a hit this offseason, obviously headlined by the loss of Tom Brady but also supplemented by key defensive losses in Kyle Van Noy, Jamie Collins, and Duron Harmon in addition to a general lack of attention towards improving a lackluster wide receiver corps. The Jets haven't beat the Patriots since their week 16 overtime thriller in 2015, but a November home game could be a good chance to do it, as the Patriots don't really possess the weapons to exploit issues with the Jets' cornerbacks nor the pass rushers to exploit issues with the Jets' offensive line. Record: 3-6
 
Week 10 at Miami: W - The Dolphins had a very poor 2019, finishing 5-11 with the 27th-ranked total offense and the 30th-ranked total defense, and as such they had an incredibly busy offseason, adding Matt Breida, Ereck Flowers, Ted Karras, Kyle Van Noy, Shaq Lawson, Emmanuel Ogbah, Elandon Roberts, and Byron Jones in free agency and Tua Tagovailoa, Austin Jackson, Noah Igbinoghene, Robert Hunt, Raekwon Davis, and Solomon Kindley in the draft. However, in Miami before the bye would be a good chance for Adam Gase to get a revenge game win, seeing as the Dolphins still have weaknesses all over their roster including quarterback, offensive tackle, and edge rusher. Record: 4-6
 
WEEK 11 BYE
 
Week 12 vs Miami: L - With all their offseason additions, the Dolphins figure to match up fairly evenly with the Jets in 2020, and so it's likely that the two teams will split the season series. Record: 4-7
 
Week 13 vs Las Vegas: W - The Raiders had a very busy offseason, adding Jason Witten, Maliek Collins, Nick Kwiatkoski, Prince Amukamara, and Damarious Randall in free agency and Henry Ruggs, Damon Arnette, Lynn Bowden, Bryan Edwards, and Amik Robertson in the draft with their only major losses being Darryl Worley and Karl Joseph. At home against a West Coast opponent, the Jets would be wise to take advantage of some of the Raiders’ weaknesses in this game, including inexperience at wide receiver, edge rusher, linebacker, and cornerback. Record: 5-7
 
Week 14 at Seattle: L - The Seahawks went 11-5 last season and were one play away from securing the top seed in the NFC, so their offseason was pretty quiet, mostly focusing on the offensive line with the losses of Germain Ifedi, DJ Fluker, and George Fant and the additions of free agents Brandon Shell, BJ Finney, and Cedric Ogbuehi, and draft pick Damien Lewis. Pete Carroll is one of the best coaches in football today, and in this late-season matchup at Seattle he’ll have the personnel advantage against the Jets offense, which lacks talented weapons and blockers. Record: 5-8
 
Week 15 at LA Rams: L - The Rams regressed to 9-7 last year and then had a difficult offseason, losing Todd Gurley, Brandin Cooks, Dante Fowler, and Nickell Robey-Coleman, with their only major addition being A’Shawn Robinson. The 2020 Rams are not the Super Bowl Rams of the past, but with both McVay and Goff still on board, the Rams have to be favorites to take this late-season home game against the Jets. Record: 5-9
 
Week 16 vs Cleveland: W - The Browns had a busy offseason, hiring head coach Kevin Stefanski, losing Greg Robinson, Joe Schobert, and Damarious Randall, signing Austin Hooper, Jack Conklin, Andrew Billings, Karl Joseph, and Damarious Randall, and drafting Jedrick Wills, Grant Delpit, and Jacob Phillips. Despite these additions, however, Cleveland still has a new, inexperienced offensive playcaller at head coach and a question mark at quarterback, and Gregg Williams generally handles quarterbacks who struggle with post-snap reads well with disguised coverages and aggressive blitz packages. Record: 6-9
 
Week 17 at New England: L - With the expanded playoffs, the Patriots have an even greater chance to make the postseason this year than they otherwise would, so this late-season match in Foxborough could be a consequential, divisional-revenge game. Record: 6-10
 
Final Record: 6-10
While I firmly believe that the Jets improved significantly this offseason, especially in terms of the offensive line and getting players back from injury, this year’s schedule is substantially more difficult that last year’s, which could result in less games in the wins column for 2020. Last year, the Jets closed out the back-half of their season going 6-2 playing against rookie Daniel Jones, rookie Dwayne Haskins, Derek Carr, Andy Dalton, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Lamar Jackson, rookie Devlin Hodges, and Matt Barkley, and this year the Jets have to play both the AFC West and the NFC West, which is a huge jump in their level of competition.
 

Training Camp Battles to Watch

WR #2: Denzel Mims vs Vyncint Smith
Jets fans would hope that starting receiver isn’t much of a battle, but since rookie wideouts traditionally have been known to take longer learning the playbook, the other receiver spot next to Perriman and Crowder is in flux. Denzel Mims, the rookie receiver from Baylor, is the odds-on favorite to get a starting role and to play as a deep threat and red-zone threat in year one. However, if Mims proves too raw off the bat, the Jets could fall back on Vyncint Smith, who had 17 receptions last year and showed his value as a deep threat.
 
Left Guard: Alex Lewis vs Cameron Clark
Following a 2019 season where Alex Lewis spot-started in place of Kelechi Osemele, the Jets rewarded him with a 3 year, $18.6 MM contract, and he goes into 2020 as the favorite to start at left guard once again. With that being said, the possibility exists that rookie tackle Cameron Clark out of Charlotte will kick inside and compete at left guard.
 
Right Guard: Brian Winters vs Greg Van Roten
After a 2019 season in which Brian Winters went down with a shoulder injury in week 10, many expected the Jets to cut him, but he instead will return as the incumbent starter at right guard. However, new free agent acquisition Greg Van Roten could switch to the right side and compete against Winters to start.
 
Right Tackle: George Fant vs Chuma Edoga
After the Jets had a poor performance form their offensive line in 2019, GM Joe Douglas brought in competition at all position, including at right tackle. George Fant, former Seattle swing tackle, is the presumptive favorite to land the starting job, despite his lack of starting experience and struggles with pass-pro footwork. Chuma Edoga could compete as well, but his performance in both run blocking and pass pro was so shaky last year as a rookie that he needed extensive help from tight ends to prevent the right side from entirely becoming a liability.
 
EDGE #2: Tarell Basham vs Kyle Phillips vs Jabari Zuniga vs John Franklin-Myers
The Jets started Jordan Jenkins and Tarell Basham at edge rusher last season, so it was somewhat of a shock to see them add absolutely no outside talent until the middle of the third round, and so now Gregg Williams and his defensive staff are forced to make the pitiful decision between starting Basham, Kyle Phillips, Jabari Zuniga, or John Franklin-Myers across from Jenkins. Basham, who the Jets claimed off of waivers in 2018, is probably the odds-on favorite to start once again after notching 2 sacks and 4 quarterback hits in 54% of the Jets' defensive snaps. Kyle Phillips, the second-year player from Tennessee who was a five-star high-school recruit, is a thicker lineman best suited to play on run downs who could push for starting snaps as well. Jabari Zuniga, 3rd-round rookie out of Florida, is a third contender for the starting job, but his interior versatility and similarity to Jenkins in terms of his stiffness and poor pad level could suggest the Jets envision him in more of a rotational role. The wildcard in this battle is John Franklin-Myers, who was claimed by the Jets off of waivers from the Rams at the start of 2019 but who also notched a pair of sacks in his rookie year and is really explosive for his size.
 
DT #2: Henry Anderson vs Nathan Shepherd
This battle won't get much media coverage, as both Anderson and Shepherd project to get plenty of tread on the New York defensive line, but nevertheless the two will compete in training camp for the upper hand in the snap count. Henry Anderson, the penetrating defensive lineman, saw his production fall off a bit in 2019, in part due to a nagging shoulder injury and utilization in different fronts and roles. Nathan Shepherd saw his role increase in the back half of the season after a suspension saw his role increase in the back half of the season after a suspension sidelined him from weeks two through eight, and with a good camp, he could establish himself as the primary nimble-footed complement to the heftier, run-stopping trio of Quinnen Williams, Steve McLendon, and Foley Fatukasi.
 
CB #2: Arthur Maulet vs Quincy Wilson vs Bryce Hall vs Blessuan Austin
The outside cornerback spot across from Pierre Desir is probably the most open starting battle on the team. Arthur Maulet, the undersized but physical cornerback out of Memphis, is probably the favorite to start after outplaying Johnson and Roberts last season to win the left cornerback job. Quincy Wilson, the former second-round pick, should be Maulet's primary competition after the Jets traded a draft pick to acquire him from the Colts. Bryce Hall, the rookie fifth-round corner from Virginia, is a darkhorse to start as well if he is healthy to start the season. Blessuan Austin, the former sixth-round pick, might factor into the competition, but he'll have Williams' doghouse after reacting poorly to his week-16 benching.
 
Kicker: Sam Ficken vs Brett Maher
Sam Ficken, who hit 70% of his kicks last season, will compete with Brett Maher, who hit 67% of his kicks last season, for the starting kicker job, but neither candidate should have to handle kickoffs with rookie punter Braden Mann in the fold.
 

Offensive and Defensive Schemes

Adam Gase, head coach and offensive playcaller for the Jets, runs a zone blocking, short passing offense mostly out of 11 personnel while also mixing in some 2-TE sets. In the run game, Gase is willing to run gap concepts based on his offensive line personnel, but he certainly favors his inside zone running playcalls. In the pass game, Gase likes to stack his receivers, throw checkdowns, split his backs out wide, and utilize the sidelines.
 
Gregg Williams, defensive coordinator for the Jets, runs a 3-4 hybrid, blitz-heavy defense with an emphasis on zone coverage. In the front seven, Williams has used both 3-4 and 4-3 base packages, though he mostly uses nickel fronts and one-gapping penetration schemes. In the secondary, Williams stresses MOFC shells, press-zone concepts, and disguised coverages and blitzes.
 
Huge thanks to u/PlatypusOfDeath for running this series.
Link to hub
submitted by PM-ME-A-PRIME-NUMBER to nyjets [link] [comments]


2020.06.09 00:14 ThirtydaysofPride Thirty Days of Pride with the Making Gay History Podcast, June 8 2020 — Dear Abby

Making Gay History Podcast - Episode 08 — Dear Abby

Episode Notes
To understand how a heterosexual, Jewish, Midwestern daughter of a Russian immigrant singlehandedly influenced how Americans thought about gay people, how parents saw their gay kids, and how gay people felt about themselves, you have to go back in time. Before Google and social media. Before the internet. Before cable TV. Back to a time when everyone read a newspaper and twin sisters born on the 4th of July in 1918 wrote competing syndicated advice columns read by tens of millions of people around the world. Pauline Esther Friedman Phillips wrote the “Dear Abby” column under the pen name Abigail Van Buren. Her twin sister, Esther Pauline Friedman Lederer wrote the “Ann Landers” column.
Episode Transcript
I’m Eric Marcus and this is Making Gay History.
In my first round of interviews for my book, I only spoke to one person who was a household name, Dear Abby. She was also known as Abigail Van Buren. Her given name was Paulene Esther. Her nickname was Popo. And my grandma was just one of 110 million people, every day around the world, who read what Dear Abby had to say.
When I was a kid, my mom sent me to Ziggy’s, the corner candy store, to get the Sunday newspapers. They were really heavy. My favorite part of the paper was the comics. My immigrant grandmother went right to Dear Abby’s column where she could get the latest advice on everything from marriage and children to abortion and homosexuality.
Abby never minced words. Biting humor was her weapon of choice. But whatever the topic, her warmth and compassion and her common sense wisdom came through loud and clear.
Abby began writing her column in 1956. From the start she got letters asking for advice on homosexuality—from gay people who wanted to change to parents who wanted to know what they did wrong. Abby did something no other famous public person did. She said positive things about gay men and women and homosexuality in general. That earned her bags of hate mail and a place in the hearts of gay people everywhere. Dear Abby is my personal hero.
So, not surprisingly, I’m a bit star struck as I pull into Abby’s driveway in Beverly Hills and then walk up to the front door of her French Provincial mini-mansion. I ring the bell. Abby opens her double-height front door and greets me with a welcoming smile. She is tiny, maybe five feet tall. She’s dressed in lavender hostess pajamas and pink fluffy slippers. Her hair is perfectly coifed. Her complexion is flawless.
We take seats at the bar in Abby’s living room. A selection of her old newspaper columns cover the marble counter. My hands shake a bit. Thankfully, I remember to press record.
———
Abby: Well, I want to get all that stuff out of storage and I want that stuff in my office where I can put my hands on it. I don’t care if it’s 1956. Okay? Thanks, honey. Carry on, babe. Bye.
That’s Jimmy. What a trip. He used to be a Catholic priest. He’s now in my office and he’s fabulous. Jimmy Hughes. He’s a darling.
Eric: May I attach this to you? I don’t want to, uh…
Abby: Sure.
Eric: Do you prefer to be called Mrs. Van Buren, Abby…?
Abby: Abby, Abby, Abby.
Eric: Abby, okay. When you first started writing your column in 1956, did you get letters concerning the issue of homosexuality or lesbianism?
Abby: Yah, I did. “How can I change? What can I do to change?”
Eric: Even in 1956 you got that kind of mail?
Abby: Oh, yah. This is an early one. “Dear Abby: To get right to the point, I’m gay. But I don’t like being gay. I want a wife, children, and a normal social life. I also have a career I enjoy greatly, in banking, in which further advancement is impossible if it becomes known that I’m gay. Psychiatrists and other therapists I’ve gone to have tried to help me adjust to my homosexuality rather than help me to change. Abby, adjusting to being homosexual is fine for those who have accepted their homosexuality, but I haven’t. I know I’d be happier straight. Please help me.”
He signs, “Unhappy in Houston.” I say, “Dear Unhappy: Did you choose to be homosexual? If so, then you could choose to be straight. But if you have always had erotic feelings for men instead of women, then face it, you are homosexual and even though you may be able to change your behavior, you will not be able to change your feelings. Some therapists insist that if a homosexual is sufficiently motivated, he or she can become straight. Maybe so, but the chances are slim. Marrying and having children may make you happier, but what about the other people you involve? To thine own self be true. Only then will you find true happiness.”
Did you ever hear of Franz Alexander?
Eric: No, I haven’t.
Abby: Franz Alexander was called the father of psychosomatic medicine. He was born in Budapest. And he was the head of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. He died in ‘64. He was a very charming, wonderful guy. A very good friend of my husband’s and mine. He said regarding homosexuality of course there is no cure because it’s not a disease.
Eric: Alexander said this.
Abby: Yah. He said, there is no cure. This is where I got my notions originally.
Eric: How far back does that date?
Abby: Maybe 1945, 1946, something around that time. But he gave me a lot of my ideas. He really educated me.
Eric: That was a rather radical way of thinking in those days.
Abby: It certainly was. It was dangerous in some circles.
Eric: Why was it dangerous?
Abby: It took courage to come out and say, “What do you mean sick? This is natural for them. This is the way they go naturally.” Now I’ve known a lot of gay people. And you can change one’s behavior, but you can’t change your feelings. And all these crazy stories that you hear about how they got that way. I’ve always thought people were born that way.
Eric: You must have known people who were gay at that time then, personally.
Abby: Yah, well, my hairdresser. He’s like a brother. And he’s been my hairdresser for about, maybe twenty-nine years. He came from Louisville, Nebraska. Beautiful guy and just a sweetheart. And he had to leave the little town of Louisville because, well, he just couldn’t survive there. I’ve taken him to Korea with me when I was a Miss Universe pageant judge. We just had a ball. He and I are in a helicopter. Have you ever been in a helicopter?
Eric: Thank god, no.
Abby: Okay. And Cloyd is his name of all things.
Eric: Cloyd?
Abby: Cloyd, but he’s not really nellie. But he’s not all that subtle. So we’re in this helicopter—these are all big Army guys, you know. And we go up and then back and his purse slid back. That’s why I said to the, “Hey, hold it,” I said, “My friend lost his purse.” The guys broke up in the front. The guy that was driving the helicopter just cracked up.
Eric: Knowing someone like that from that part of the country I would think it would have given you some insight into what it was like for young kids growing up in small towns who were gay. Did you ever talk about…?
Abby: Oh, yeah. Oh certainly, certainly. Never came out to his parents. He said they couldn’t handle that. His mother just adored him and he was a wonderful son, just a wonderful son.
Eric: You were probably the only voice out there at that time. And I would imagine you received lots of letters from homosexuals, men and women, with questions.
Abby: And parents of gay people, too. Because to them it was, “Where have we gone wrong?” I’d tell them, “You didn’t go wrong. Just love him, love him, love him.” That’s it.
Eric: How did your paper let you get away with it?
Abby: Lots of papers complained, but they never dropped me. The San Diego Union had never published the word homosexual in their newspaper when I started. I was a breakthrough. And they’re still pretty conservative, but that was the first time they’d ever published the word homosexual, unless they dragged a guy… this guy was going to jail or something, but in a column? And to be kindly toward a homosexual? To be understanding?
Eric: It seems things really heated up in the early ‘70s for you. There’s a column I came across in which you write rather strongly. In 1971, you wrote, “To those who wrote to blast me for my refusal to put down the homosexual: The most burdensome problem the homosexual must bear is the stigma placed upon him by an unenlightened and intolerant society. Their sexual bent is as natural and normal for them as ours is for us.” And then you talk about they, too, are God’s children. It seems that—my impression was that things began to heat up in that issue, the homosexuality issue, in the late ‘60s, early ‘70s. That’s when gay civil rights came into bloom. Did you come under more attacks during that time for your comments or did you get a steady stream of hate mail?
Abby: It was a steady stream of hate mail. Every time I’d run something compassionate or sympathetic I would get a lot of, I’d get hate mail. It wouldn’t bother me, but I got a lot of it, but I have made that statement, “God made gays as well as he made straights.” I’ve said that because that’s the way I feel.
I think I’ve always been bold. I never fudged. I never apologized. And I got a lot of… My lord, I tell you the Bible thumpers really let me have it. I was getting Leviticus, and Corinthians, and proverbs and I was getting all that stuff. You’re not going to change their minds because they’re fanatics. They can’t help it because this is the they believe. Fine. That’s okay with me. But don’t tell me what to believe. Biblical injunctions mean nothing to me, because you can find all kinds of contradictions in the Bible. You can find anything you want in the Bible. If it makes people behave better, fine. But if it makes people less understanding of their fellow man, then something is wrong, you see. Your beliefs should make you better and should make you kinder, not more hateful.
Eric: How did you handle the negative mail? Wasn’t it upsetting to you in some way?
Abby: Well, I guess it was upsetting. But it saddened me that people could be so unfeeling. Ignorant.
Eric: What sorts of things did they say to you? Do you recall?
Abby: I ought to burn in hell, you know. Oh, yes.
Eric: Really.
Abby: Oh, sure. The fundamentalist types would say that. “You should be saved.” People want to show me the light. They think I’m misguided. They say, “You’re a good Christian woman.” I always write back and say, “Thank you, you’re very kind, but I hope I’m a good Jewish person, because I am Jewish.” I always let them know that.
Eric: There was a column that you wrote—this is the woman who complained about the new neighbors next door. A strange man, the couple.
Abby: Well, the letter was, this is a nice neighborhood and we’re very disgusted with these types and what could we do to improve the neighborhood. And my answer was, “You could move.” The gays thought it was hilarious. But other than just being amusing, entertaining, there was a good message there.
Eric: Which was?
Abby: Which was that they have a right to be there. If you don’t like it, you could move because they have as much right to be them as you have to be yourself.
Eric: How much of an impact do you think you’ve had as one person on this issue?
Abby: I think I was the, well, I wouldn’t say the first. I was one of the first persons on the national level that wasn’t gay, I wasn’t defending myself. I was defending everyone’s right to be themselves, gay, straight, no matter.
Eric: And that was beginning in the 1960s.
Abby: People tell me it took a lot of guts, but I was happy to have platform, such as I had.
Eric: Were you at all concerned that your views on this subject would harm your career, because at the time you wrote, the 1950s, 1960s, even to the ‘70s…
Abby: I had an awful lot of people who thought I was wrong, why should I stick my neck out for them, you know. That didn’t bother me. I never lost a paper that I know of because of this.
Eric: Where does the courage come from?
Abby: I don’t know. Eric, I can’t tell you. But it must have been there. It was there all the time. I got a love letters as well as hate letters. That keeps me going.
Eric: Those are the ones you read.
Abby: I read ‘em all.
Eric: Thank you so much for your time. It’s been a pleasure talking about this.
Abby: Eric, a pleasure and I wish you much success with your book. I know it’s going to be good. You ask good questions.
Eric: Thank you.
———
Soon after I interviewed Abby, she introduced me to her daughter Jeanne. We became fast friends. Jeanne took over the “Dear Abby” column from her mom in 2002 and like her mom she’s been a fierce ally to gay people and a champion of LGBT rights.
Jeanne’s mother died on January 16, 2013. She was 94. If you’ve never seen a picture of Abigail Van Buren, Jeanne’s mom, have a look at the iconic photo from the mid-1960s I’ve posted at makinggayhistory.com. I don’t know about you, but when I look at that photo I can’t imagine not taking her advice.
I’ve got a few key people to thank for making this podcast possible. Thank you to our executive producer, the hard-working Sara Burningham, our audio engineer Casey Holford, and our composer, Fritz Myers.
Thank you also to our social media guru, Hannah Moch, our webmaster Jonathan Dozier-Ezell, and Zachary Seltzer, the man responsible for each episode’s show notes. We had production help from Jenna Weiss-Berman, who believed in this podcast even before it was a podcast.
Making Gay History is a co-production of Pineapple Street Media, with assistance from the New York Public Library’s Manuscripts and Archives Division.
Funding is provided by the Arcus Foundation, which is dedicated to the idea that people can live in harmony with one another and the natural world. Learn more about Arcus and its partners at ArcusFoundation.org.
And if you like what you’ve heard, please subscribe to Making Gay History on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also listen to all our episodes on makinggayhistory.com. That’s where you’ll find photos and information about each of our interview subjects.
So long. Until next time.
###
submitted by ThirtydaysofPride to lgbt [link] [comments]


2020.04.01 17:41 cooklanbrahh [SHARE] Textbook Megathread #4 Free PDF

Download any of these for free at https://oppfiles.com/585933

DM me if you have any requests for anything not on the list.
If you want solution manuals/testbanks, you can also request them
Almost all the books are in their latest editions and some of them are available in multiple editions too.
Please subscribe the sub to find all the latest textbook releases.
Enjoy!
  1. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes, and Systems, 6th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  2. Precalculus Essentials: J. S. Ratti & Marcus S. McWaters
  3. Genetics- A Conceptual Approach, 6th edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  4. The Global Casino, Fifth Edition: An Introduction to Environmental Issues: Nick Middleton
  5. Macroeconomics, 2nd Canadian Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells & Iris Au
  6. Biology: A Global Approach, 10th edition: Neil A. Campbell & Jane B. Reece & Lisa Urry & Michael L Cain & Steven A Wasserman & Author
  7. Information Technology Project Management, 5th Edition: Jack T. Marchewka
  8. Clinical Laboratory Hematology, 3rd Global Edition: Shirlyn B. Kenzie & Lynne Williams
  9. Exploring Medical Language, 10th edition: Myrna LaFleur Brooks & Danielle LaFleur Brooks
  10. Business Essentials, Eighth Canadian Edition: Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin & Frederick A. Starke & George Dracopoulos
  11. Chemistry Atoms First, 3rd edition: Julia Burdge & Jason Overby
  12. Sensation and Perception, 2nd edition: Steven Yantis & Richard Abrams
  13. Abnormal Psychology, 8th Global Edition: Thomas F. Oltmanns & Robert E. Emery
  14. Documentation Manual for Occupational Therapy, 4th edition : Crystal A. Gateley & Sherry Borcherding
  15. Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement, 13th edition: Michelle A. Green
  16. Java For Everyone: Compatible with Java 5, 6, and 7, 2nd Edition: Cay S. Horstmann
  17. Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application, 9th edition: Bessie L. Marquis & Carol J. Huston
  18. Economics: The User's Guide: Ha-Joon Chang
  19. Gendered Lives, 12th edition: Julia T. Wood & Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz
  20. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  21. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  22. Calculus - Early Transcendentals, 8th edition: James Stewart
  23. Willard and Spackman's Occupational Therapy, 12th edition: Barbara A. Schell & Marjorie Scaffa & Glen Gillen & Ellen S. Cohn
  24. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th edition: M. Morris Mano
  25. Principles of Risk Management and Insurance, 13th Global Edition: George E. Rejda & Michael McNamara
  26. Community & Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Public's Health, 9th edition: Cherie Rector
  27. Environmental Science for AP®, Second Edition: Andrew Friedland & Rick Relyea
  28. College Algebra, 4th Edition: Cynthia Y. Young
  29. Sustainable Urban Development Reader (Routledge Urban Reader Series), 3rd Edition: Wheeler and Beatly
  30. Psychiatric Nursing: Assessment, Care Plans, and Medications, 9th edition: Townsend, Mary
  31. Managing Business Process Flows (3rd Edition): Ravi Anupindi
  32. Precalculus, 10th edition: Michael Sullivan
  33. Psychology in Your Life (Second Edition): Sarah Grison & Todd Heatherton & Michael Gazzaniga
  34. Introductory Algebra, 12th edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  35. American History: Connecting with the Past-Vol 2: Alan Brinkley
  36. Cities of the World: Regional Patterns and Urban Environments, 6th edition: Brunn, Stanley D.; Hays-Mitchell, Maureen; Zeigler, Donald J.
  37. Strategies for Successful Writing, 11th edition: James A. Reinking & Robert A. von der Osten
  38. College Algebra with Modeling & Visualization, 6th edition: Gary K. Rockswold
  39. Understanding Psychology (11th Edition): Tony Morris
  40. Understanding ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS: A Worktext, 3rd edition: Mary Jo Bowie
  41. Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief 6th edition: Carol Berkin & Christopher Miller & Robert Cherny & James Gormly & Douglas Egerton
  42. Crossroads and Cultures, Volume II: Since 1300: A History of the World's Peoples: Bonnie G. Smith & Marc Van De Mieroop & Richard von Glahn & Kris Lane
  43. Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 4th edition: Joan L. Slonczewski & John W. Foster
  44. Web Design: Introductory (HTML), 4th edition: Gary B. Shelly & Jennifer T. Campbell
  45. Problems from Philosophy, 3rd Edition: James Rachels & Stuart Rachels
  46. Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America (Fourth Edition): John Charles Chasteen
  47. Data Structures and Algorithms Using Java: William McAllister
  48. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, 6th edition: Edward Allen & Joseph Iano
  49. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 7th edition: Douglas A. Skoog & F. James Holler & Stanley R. Crouch
  50. Hands-On Microsoft Windows Server 2016, 2nd Edition: Michael Palmer
  51. A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists, 6th edition: Fred Beisse
  52. The World A History, Volume One (3rd Edition): Felipe Fernández-Armesto
  53. Discovering the Life Span, 4th edition: Robert S. Feldman
  54. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  55. Ethics for the Information Age, 7th Edition: Michael J. Quinn
  56. Human Communication in Society, 4th edition: Jess K. Alberts & Thomas K. Nakayama & Judith N. Martin
  57. Traditions and Encounters Vol 1 (History), 6th edition: Jerry Bentley
  58. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  59. Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions, 6th edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  60. Diversity Consciousness: Opening Our Minds to People, Cultures, and Opportunities, 4th edition: Richard D. Bucher
  61. MCSA Guide to Administering Microsoft Windows Server 2012/R2, Exam 70-411: Greg Tomsho
  62. Your Office: Microsoft Excel 2016 Comprehensive (Your Office for Office 2016 Series): Amy S. Kinser & Kristyn Jacobson & Eric Kinser & Brant Paige Moriarity
  63. Principles of Macroeconomics (Second Edition): Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  64. Veterinary Surgery: Small Animal Expert Consult: 2-Volume Set, 2nd edition: Spencer A. Johnston
  65. College Algebra, 7th edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  66. Certified Paralegal Review Manual: A Practical Guide to CP Exam Preparation, 4th edition: Virginia Koerselman Newman
  67. American Government: Power and Purpose (Fourteenth Core Edition): Stephen Ansolabehere & Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Kenneth A. Shepsle
  68. Numerical Analysis, 10th edition: Richard L. Burden & J. Douglas Faires & Annette M. Burden
  69. The Mechanical Design Process, 5th edition: David G. Ullman
  70. Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development, 6th edition: Rowntree,Lewis, Price & Wyckoff
  71. The Old Testament Story (9th Edition): John Tullock
  72. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams
  73. Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints, 6th edition: Robert H. Seller & Andrew B. Symons
  74. The Litigation Paralegal: A Systems Approach, 6th edition: James W. H. McCord & Pamela Tepper
  75. Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law (Aspen Casebook), 4th edition: Lisa G. Lerman & Philip G. Schrag
  76. Principles of Auditing & Other Assurance Services, 20th edition: O. Ray Whittington, Kurt Pany
  77. Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th edition: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating: Rhea Paul & Courtenay Norbury
  78. Organisational Behaviour Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Australasian Edition: Wood, Jack; Zeffane, Rachid M.; Fromholtz, Michele
  79. Essentials of Corporate Finance, 9th Edition: Stephen A. Ross, Randolph W. Westerfield, Bradford D. Jordan
  80. Development of Children, 7th edition: Cynthia Lightfoot
  81. Asian Art: Marika Sardar & Dorinda Neave & Lara C. W. Blanchard
  82. Macroeconomics (6th Edition): R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony P. O'Brien
  83. Electron Flow in Organic Chemistry: A Decision-Based Guide to Organic Mechanisms (2nd Edition): Scudder, Paul H.(Author)
  84. Biochemistry, 1st edition: Roger L. Miesfeld & Megan M. McEvoy
  85. Stress Management for Life: A Research-Based Experiential Approach, 4th edition: Michael Olpin & Margie Hesson
  86. Engineering Fundamentals: An Introduction to Engineering, 5th edition: Saeed Moaveni
  87. Articulation and Phonological Disorders: Speech Sound Disorders in Children (8th Edition): John E. Bernthal & Nicholas W. Bankson & Peter Flipsen Jr.
  88. Communication in a Civil Society: Shelley D. Lane & Ruth Anne Abigail & John Gooch
  89. The Immune System, 4th Edition: Peter Parham
  90. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 4th edition: Anthony J. Hayter
  91. Social Psychology: The Science of Everyday Life: Jeff Greenberg & Toni Schmader & Jamie Arndt & Mark Landau
  92. Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition: Talaro
  93. Business Analysis and Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 5th edition: Krishna Palepu & Paul Healy
  94. Introductory Chemistry, 8th Edition: Steven S. Zumdahl & Donald J. Decoste
  95. Single Variable Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition: James Stewart
  96. Foundations of Education, Third Edition: Volume I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments: Various
  97. Campbell Essential Biology with Physiology, 5th Global Edition: Eric J. Simon & Jean L. Dickey & Jane B. Reece & Kelly A. Hogan
  98. Mastering the World of Psychology, 5th edition: Ellen Green Wood & Samuel E. Wood & Denise Boyd
  99. Business Data Networks and Security (10th Edition): Raymond R. Panko & Julia L. Panko
  100. America's History, Volume I: To 1877, 8th edition: James A. Henretta & Eric Hinderaker & Rebecca Edwards & Robert O. Self
  101. Investigating Social Problems: A. Javier Trevino
  102. Tropical Ecosystems and Ecological Concepts, 2nd edition: Patrick Osborne
  103. Read, Reason, Write, 11 Edition: Dorothy Seyler
  104. MGMT (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press) 10th Edition: Chuck Williams
  105. MLA Handbook, 8th edition: The Modern Language Association of America
  106. The Game Design Reader: A Rules of Play Anthology (MIT Press): Katie Salen Tekinba & Eric Zimmerman
  107. American Politics Today, 5th Core edition: William T. Bianco & David T. Canon
  108. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 3rd edition: Clark Spencer Larsen
  109. Awakening: An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought, 5th Edition: Patrick S. Bresnan
  110. Discovering Computers ©2016 (Shelly Cashman Series): Misty E. Vermaat & Susan L. Sebok & Steven M. Freund & Jennifer T. Campbell & Mark Frydenberg
  111. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance (4th Edition): Jonathan Berk & Peter Demarzo & Jarrad Harford
  112. Human Anatomy & Physiology, 9th/10th edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Katja N. Hoehn
  113. Structural Analysis (9th Edition): Russell C. Hibbeler
  114. Hydrology and Hydraulic Systems, 4th edition: Ram Gupta
  115. Between One and Many: The Art and Science of Public Speaking, 7th edition: Steven R. Brydon & Michael D Scott
  116. Logic: The Essentials: Patrick J. Hurley
  117. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Volume I, 14th edition: Fred S Kleiner
  118. Paralegal Professional: The Essentials, 5th edition: Thomas F. Goldman & Henry R. Cheeseman
  119. Chemistry: Structure and Properties, 2nd edition: Nivaldo J. Tro
  120. Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport (B&B Physical Education),10th Edition: Angela Lumpkin
  121. Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  122. American Government, 2014 Elections and Updates Edition: Karen J. O'Connor & Larry J. Sabato & Alixandra B. Yanus
  123. Nutrition: Science and Applications, 4th Edition: Lori A. Smolin & Mary B. Grosvenor
  124. Experiential Approach to Organization Development, 8th edition: Brown, Donald R
  125. How to Work a Room, 25th Anniversary Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Making Lasting Connections--In Person and Online: Susan RoAne
  126. The Creative Spirit: An Introduction to Theatre, 6th edition: Stephanie Arnold
  127. The Philosopher's Way, 5th edition: John Chaffee
  128. Problem Solving with C++, 9th edition: Walter Savitch
  129. Skills for Success with Office 2016 Volume 1 (Skills for Success for Office 2016 Series): Margo Chaney Adkins & Lisa Hawkins & Catherine Hain & Stephanie Murre-Wolf
  130. The Physics of Everyday Phenomena, Eighth Edition: W. Thomas Griffith & Juliet W. Brosing
  131. Precalculus, 6th edition: Margaret L. Lial & John Hornsby & David I. Schneider & Callie J. Daniels
  132. Starting Out with Programming Logic & Design, Fourth Edition: Tony Gaddis
  133. MKTG11, 11th Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair & Carl McDaniel
  134. The Business Writer's Companion, 8th edition: Gerald J. Alred & Charles T. Brusaw & Walter E. Oliu
  135. America: A Concise History, Volume 2, 6th edition: James Henretta
  136. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: David C. Colander
  137. Psychology, 11th edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  138. American Education: A History, 5th edition: Jennings L. Wagoner Jr. & Wayne J. Urban
  139. Give Me Liberty! An American History, Seagull 5th edition-Vol 1: Eric Foner
  140. Anthropology: The Human Challenge, 15th edition: William A. Haviland & Harald E. L. Prins & Dana Walrath & Bunny McBride
  141. Lifespan Development, 7th edition: Denise Boyd & Helen Bee
  142. Essentials of Database Management: Jeffrey A. Hoffer & Heikki Topi & Venkataraman Ramesh
  143. GOVT8 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press), 8th edition: Edward Sidlow & Beth Henschen
  144. Horngren's Accounting: The Managerial Chapters (11th Edition): Tracie L. Miller-Nobles & Brenda L. Mattison & Ella Mae Matsumura
  145. Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Context, 3rd edition: Stephen Orvis & Carol Ann Drogus
  146. Experience Psychology, 3rd Edition: Laura A. King
  147. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd Edition: Dan O’Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  148. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics, 9th edition: Raymond A. Serway & John W. Jewett
  149. The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology, 5th Edition: Kerry Ferris & Jill Stein
  150. Biological Science, 6th edition: Scott Freeman & Kim Quillin & Lizabeth Allison & Michael Black & Emily Taylor & Greg Podgorski & Jeff Carmichael
  151. Communication: Embracing Difference, 4th edition: Daniel M. Dunn & Lisa J. Goodnight
  152. A Sequence for Academic Writing, 7th edition: Laurence Behrens & Leonard Rosen
  153. Guide to Operating Systems, 5th edition: Greg Tomsho
  154. THiNK, 4th Edition: Judith Boss
  155. Principles of Economics, 8th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  156. Shelly Cashman Series Discovering Computers & Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2016: A Fundamental Combined Approach: Jennifer T. Campbell
  157. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature Of Matter And Change, Eighth Edition: Martin S. Silberberg, Patricia G. Amateis
  158. Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services, 5th edition: Jerry V. Diller
  159. Social Psychology, 10th edition: Saul Kassin
  160. Our Sexuality, 13th edition: Robert Crooks & Karla Baur
  161. Professional Nursing Concepts: Competencies for Quality Leadership, 3rd Edition: Finkelman, Anita & Kenner, Carole
  162. Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 3rd Edition: Kyle, Theresa & Ricci, Susan & Carman, Susan
  163. Psychology, 4th edition: Schacter, Daniel L. & Gilbert, Daniel T. & Nock, Matthew K. & Wegner, Daniel M.
  164. 21st Century Astronomy, 5th edition: Laura Kay, Stacy Palen & George Blumenthal
  165. Calculus, 11th edition: Ron Larson
  166. Surface Water-Quality Monitoring: Steven C. Chapra
  167. Pearson's Federal Taxation 2018, Comprehensive: Thomas R. Pope
  168. Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th edition: Thomas L. Wheelen
  169. Bankruptcy Law and Practice: Grace A. Luppino J.D
  170. Family Law for the Paralegal, 3rd edition: Mary E. Wilson
  171. Successful Writing at Work, 10th edition: Philip C. Kolin
  172. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Dan O'Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  173. Intimate Relationships, 7th Edition: Rowland Miller
  174. Software Engineering, 10th edition: Ian Sommerville
  175. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics, Structure, and Change, 10th edition: Peter Atkins & Julio de Paula
  176. Educational Research: Competencies for Analysis and Applications (11th Edition): Geoffrey E. Mills & L. R. Gay
  177. At a Glance: Writing Essays and Beyond, 6th edition: Lee Brandon
  178. Delmar’s Standard Textbook of Electricity, 6th edition: Stephen L. Herman
  179. Psychology, 5th edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli
  180. Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 15th Edition: Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl
  181. The Little Seagull Handbook, 3rd Edition: Richard Bullock, Michal Brody & Francine Weinberg
  182. STAT 2: Building Models for a World of Data: Ann R. Cannon
  183. Interplay-The Process of Interpersonal Communication, 13th edition: Ronald Adler
  184. SELL 5 (New, Engaging Titles From 4LTR Press), 5th edition: Thomas N. Ingram & Raymond (buddy) W. Laforge & Ramon A. Avila & Charles H. Schwepker & Michael R. Williams
  185. Marketing Channels, 8th edition: Bert Rosenbloom
  186. The Changing Earth: Exploring Geology and Evolution, 7th Edition: James S. Monroe & Reed Wicander
  187. Applied Regression Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, 3rd edition: John Fox
  188. Development Economics: Debraj Ray
  189. Organic Chemistry, 9th edition: Leroy G. Wade
  190. A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 9th edition: Jan A. Pechenik
  191. DSP First, 2nd Edition: McClellan, Schafer & Yoder
  192. Epidemiology, 5th Edition: Leon Gordis
  193. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Edition: Dee Unglaub Silverthorn
  194. Essentials of Sociology 12th edition: James M. Henslin
  195. Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th edition: Jacqueline Burchum & Laura Rosenthal
  196. Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives, 6th edition: Michael E. Kraft & Scott R. Furlong
  197. Financial Management: Principles and Applications (12th Edition): Sheridan Titman & Arthur J. Keown
  198. Animal Physiology, 4th Edition: Richard W. Hill
  199. Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy (5th Edition): Robert W. Bauman
  200. Understanding Basic Statistics, 7th edition: Charles Henry Brase & Corrinne Pellillo Brase
  201. Organic Chemistry: Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual, 3rd edition: David Klein
  202. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 11th edition: Howard Anton, Irl Bivens & Stephen Davis
  203. An Introduction to Student–Involved Assessment FOR Learning, 7th edition: Jan Chappuis & Rick Stiggins
  204. The Bedford Researcher with 2016 MLA Update, 5th edition: Mike Palmquist
  205. Roots of the Western Tradition: A Short History of the Ancient World, 8th edition: Guy Rogers & C. Warren Hollister
  206. Contemporary Logistics, 12th edition: Paul R. Murphy & A. Michael Knemeyer
  207. Personal Finance, 13th edition: E. Thomas Garman
  208. C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 8th Edition: D. S. Malik
  209. Information Systems Today: Managing in the Digital World, 7th edition: Joseph Valacich & Christoph Schneider
  210. New Products Management, 11th Edition: Merle Crawford & Anthony Di Benedetto
  211. A World of Ideas, 10th Edition: Lee A. Jacobus
  212. Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control: Terry L.M. Bartelt
  213. We the People: An Introduction to American Politics 11th Essentials edition: Benjamin Ginsberg, et al.
  214. Wardlaw's Contemporary Nutrition, 10th edition: Anne Smith & Angela Collene
  215. Technical Communication, 14th Edition: John M. Lannon
  216. Electronics Fundamentals: A Systems Approach: Thomas L. Floyd & David M. Buchla
  217. Discrete-Event System Simulation, 5th edition: Jerry Banks & John S. Carson & Barry L. Nelson & David M. Nicol
  218. Engaging Social Welfare: An Introduction to Policy Analysis: Mark J. Stern
  219. Social Welfare Policy and Advocacy: Advancing Social Justice through 8 Policy Sectors: Bruce S. Jansson
  220. Foundations of Astronomy, 12th edition: Michael A. Seeds & Dana Backman
  221. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: Volume: 1 (Concise Edition): Elizabeth Pollard & Clifford Rosenberg & Robert Tignor
  222. The Art of Public Speaking, 12th Edition: Stephen E. Lucas
  223. Genetic Essentials: Concepts and Conncections, 3rd edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  224. Prosthodontic Treatment for Edentulous Patients: Complete Dentures and Implant-Supported Prostheses, 13th edition: George A. Zarb & John Hobkirk & Steven Eckert & Rhonda Jacob
  225. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 9th edition: Robert Jurmain & Lynn Kilgore & Wenda Trevathan
  226. The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook with 2016 MLA Update: Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin & Francine Weinberg
  227. Biochemistry: Concepts and Connections: Dean R. Appling & Spencer J. Anthony-Cahill
  228. The Basic Practice of Statistics, 7th edition: David S. Moore & William I. Notz & Michael A. Fligner
  229. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd edition: GEORGE YOUNG and William Hopwood
  230. Macroeconomics, 4th edition: Charles I. Jones
  231. Web Development and Design Foundations with HTML5, 8th edition: Terry Ann Felke-Morris, Ed.D
  232. Invitation to Public Speaking - National Geographic Edition, 5th Edition: Cindy L. Griffin
  233. Marketing: the Core, 6th edition: Roger A. Kerin, Steven W. Hartley
  234. Development: Infancy Through Adolescence: Laurence Steinberg and Deborah Lowe Vandell
  235. Sports Economics: Roger D. Blair
  236. Quick & Easy Medical Terminology, 8th edition: Peggy C. Leonard
  237. Legal Research and Writing for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 8th edition: Deborah E. Bouchoux
  238. Evidence for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 5th edition: Joelyn D. Marlowe
  239. Criminal Law, 12th edition: Joel Samaha
  240. Natural Resource Economics: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Barry C. Field
  241. Learning with LabVIEW, 1st Edition: Robert H. Bishop
  242. Methods in Behavioral Research, 12th edition: Paul C. Cozby & Scott C. Bates
  243. Contemporary Human Behavior Theory: A Critical Perspective for Social Work , 3rd edition: Susan P. Robbins
  244. Managerial Accounting for Managers, 4th edition: Eric Noreen
  245. Basic Marketing Research: Using Microsoft Excel Data Analysis, 3rd Edition: Alvin Burns & Ronald Bush
  246. Dosage Calculations Made Incredibly Easy! (Incredibly Easy! Series®), 5th edition: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  247. Fundamentals of Financial Management, 14th edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Joel F. Houston
  248. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture, 5th edition: Richard J. Payne
  249. FOCUS on Community College Success, 4th edition: Constance Staley
  250. The American Promise, Value Edition, Volume 2, 7th edition: James L. Roark & Michael P. Johnson & Patricia Cline Cohen & Sarah Stage & Susan M. Hartmann
  251. The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, 11th Edition: Frederic S. Mishkin
  252. Management, 14th edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & Joseph J. Martocchio & Lori K. Long
  253. Organizational Behavior, 17th edition: Stephen P. Robbins
  254. Race and Ethnicity: The United States and the World (2nd Edition): Scupin, Raymond, Ph.D
  255. Entrepreneurial Small Business, 5th edition: Jerome A. Katz & Richard P. Green II
  256. Teaching Discipline-Specific Literacies in Grades 6-12: Preparing Students for College, Career, and Workforce Demands: Vicky I. Zygouris-Coe
  257. Human Development A Cultural Approach (2nd Edition): Jeffrey J. Arnett
  258. Listening to Music, 8th edition: Craig Wright
  259. Work in the 21st Century, 5th edition: Frank J. Landy
  260. Principles of Microeconomics, 8th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  261. Strategic Management: Text and Cases (Irwin Management), 8th Edition: Gregory G Dess Dr. and Gerry McNamara
  262. Essentials of Sociology, 2nd edition: George Ritzer
  263. Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, 7th Edition: John Perry & Michael Bratman
  264. Real Estate Development - 5th Edition: Principles and Process: Mike E. Miles & Laurence M. Netherton & Adrienne Schmitz
  265. Real Estate Finance & and Investments, 15th edition: William Brueggeman
  266. A First Course in Differential Equations with Modeling Applications, 11th edition: Dennis G. Zill
  267. The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, 10th edition: James W. Zubrick
  268. Administration of Wills, Trusts and Estates, 5th edition: Gordon Brown & Scott Myers
  269. Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years (Early Childhood Education Series): Judy Harris Helm & Lilian G. Katz
  270. Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 8th Edition: Halliday & Resnick & Walker
  271. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 2nd Edition: Weygandt & Kimmel & Kieso
  272. College Algebra, 6th edition: Mark Dugopolski
  273. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture: Volume Two, Brief 4th Edition : Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  274. Society: The Basics, 14th Edition: John J Macionis
  275. M: Marketing, 5th Edition: Dhruv Grewal, Michael Levy
  276. Mass Media and American Politics, 10th edition: Doris A. Graber & Johanna L. Dunaway
  277. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  278. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 E-Book: 5 Books in 1 (Ferri's Medical Solutions): Fred F. Ferri
  279. Organic Chemistry, 5th Edition: Janice Gorzynski Smith
  280. COMM4 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press): Kathleen S. Verderber, Deanna D. Sellnow & Rudolph F. Verderber
  281. The Theatre Experience, 13th edition: Edwin Wilson
  282. Mcknight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 12th edition: Darrel Hess & Dennis Tasa
  283. Intermediate Algebra, 12th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  284. Strategic Management Concept, 3rd Edition: Frank Rothaermel
  285. Moral Issues in Business, 13th edition: William H. Shaw
  286. Marketing 2016, 18th edition: William M. Pride & O. C. Ferrell
  287. Experiencing the World's Religions: Tradition, Challenge, and Change, 6th Edition: Michael Molloy
  288. Fundamentals of Cost Accounting, 5th edition: William N. Lanen, Shannon W. Anderson, Michael W. Maher
  289. Motivational Interviewing in Health Care: Helping Patients Change Behavior (Applications of Motivational Interviewing): Stephen Rollnick & William R. Miller & Christopher C. Butler
  290. Community and Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 1st edition: Gail A. Harkness & Rosanna DeMarco
  291. Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations, 6th Edition: Mary A. Nies & Melanie McEwen
  292. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart, 4th Edition, Volume One: Robert Tignor
  293. Microeconomics: Theory & Applications, 12th edition: Edgar K. Browning
  294. CCNA Routing and Switching ICND2 200-105 Official Cert Guide, Academic Edition: Wendell Odom
  295. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 11th edition: Ross & Westerfield & Jordan
  296. Daniels and Worthingham's Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination and Performance Testing (Daniels & Worthington's Muscle Testing (Hislop)), 9th Edition: Helen Hislop & Dale Avers & Marybeth Brown
  297. Worlds Together Worlds Apart, 4th Edition , Volume Two: Robert Tignor & Jeremy Adelman
  298. Human Relations for Career and Personal Success, Concepts, Applications, and Skills, 11th edition: Andrew J. DuBrin
  299. The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, 6th edition: Leigh Ryan & Lisa Zimmerelli
  300. Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 16th edition: Joel Feinberg & Russ Shafer-Landau
  301. Environment and You, The (2nd Edition): Norm Christensen & Lissa Leege
  302. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, 6th edition: Jamie Rankin & Larry Wells
  303. Essentials of Marketing: A Marketing Strategy Planning Approach, 14th edition: William D. Perreault & Jr. & Joseph P. Cannon & E. Jerome McCarthy
  304. Financial & Managerial Accounting, 17th Edition: Jan R. Williams
  305. Statistics, Data Analysis, and Decision Modeling (5th Edition): James R. Evans
  306. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, 8th edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  307. Big Ideas of Early Mathematics: What Teachers of Young Children Need to Know: The Early Math Collaborative- E
  308. Bailey's Research for the Health Professional, 3rd edition: Diana Bailey & Angela Hissong
  309. Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, 7th edition: John W. Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson & Stephen D. Burd
  310. Survey of Operating Systems, 5th edition: Jane Holcombe
  311. Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents, 7th edition: Jane Case-Smith & Jane Clifford O'Brien
  312. McGraw Hill Taxation of Business Entities, 2018 Edition: SPILKER & AYERS & BARRICK & OUTSLAY & ROBINSON & WEAVER & WORSHAM
  313. Accounting Controls Guidebook: Third Edition: A Practical Guide: Steven Bragg
  314. The African-American Odyssey: Volume 2 (6th Edition): Darlene Clark Hine
  315. Exploring Psychology in Modules, 10th edition: David Myers & Nathan Dewall
  316. The Human Body in Health and Illness, 5th edition: Barbara Herlihy
  317. CPHQ Exam Secrets Study Guide: CPHQ Test Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  318. CPHQ Exam Practice Questions (First Set): CPHQ Practice Tests & Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  319. Philosophy: A Text with Readings, 13th edition: Manuel Velasquez
  320. Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics: Using Microsoft Excel 2016, 4th Edition: Neil J. Salkind
  321. Tort Law: Text and Materials, 5th edition: Mark Lunney & Ken Oliphant
  322. Graphic Design School: The Principles and Practice of Graphic Design, 5th edition: David Dabner & Sandra Stewart & Eric Zempol
  323. Microbe, 2nd edition: Michele Swanson, Gemma Reguera, Moselio Schaechter & Frederick Neidhardt
  324. An Introduction to Modern Welfare Economics: Per-Olov Johansson
  325. Human Sexuality, 4th Edition: Roger R. Hock
  326. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, 6th Edition: Lisa J. McIntyre
  327. THINK Psychology, Second Canadian Edition: Abigail A. Baird & Anjanie McCarthy
  328. General Medical Conditions in the Athlete, 2nd edition: Micki Cuppett & Katie Walsh
  329. Laboratory Techniques in Organic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Jerry R. Mohrig & David Alberg & Gretchen Hofmeister & Christine Hammond
  330. C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures, 8th edition: D. S. Malik
  331. Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere, 7th edition: C. Donald Ahrens
  332. St. Martin's Guide to Writing Short Edition with 2016 MLA Update, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper
  333. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th edition: Elaine N. Marieb, Suzanne M. Keller
  334. Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 7th Edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  335. Manual of Structural Kinesiology, 19th Edition: R.T. Floyd
  336. California: The Politics of Diversity, 8th edition: David G. Lawrence
  337. American Government and Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Lynne E. Ford
  338. Business Essentials (11th Edition): Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin
  339. Music: An Appreciation, Brief Edition (B&B Music), 9th Edition: Roger Kamien
  340. Graphic Design Solutions, 5th edition: Robin Landa
  341. Classics of Western Philosophy (Eighth Edition): Steven M. Cahn
  342. International Business, 1st Edition: J. Michael Geringer, Jeanne M. McNett, Michael S. Minor, Donald A. Ball
  343. Texas Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Mark Jones
  344. The Film Experience: An Introduction, 4th Edition: Timothy Corrigan & Patricia White
  345. Adobe® Dreamweaver® Creative Cloud™: Comprehensive: Corinne L. Hoisington & Jessica L. Minnick
  346. Web Design: Introductory (Shelly Cashman), 6th Edition: Jennifer T. Campbell

Download any of these for free at https://oppfiles.com/585933
submitted by cooklanbrahh to ebookleaksdownload [link] [comments]


2020.03.16 19:41 KikiFlowers The Hamilton Predators? It almost happened!

So to start, this obviously won’t cover everything Predators, I’ll gloss over their first seasons and get into the meat of it pretty quick.

Origins

Nashville is a sports city built on relocation, the Titans relocating from Houston, even the Predators have relocation in their history...ish. Late into 1995, Nashville had been wanting a team, at this point in the decade they were a city with no major sports teams. The Oilers wouldn’t relocate for another 2 years and in the meantime they wanted hockey or basketball to come to the city. The city of Nashville officially offered a $20 Million($32.97 give or take, today) relocation bonus to any team who would relocate to Nashville. It just so happens the New Jersey Devils were for some reason that such a team. They had been attempting to terminate their lease with the NJSEA for some time and the essentially “free” $20 million was a tempting offer to ownership of the Devils, the deal never went through, but the city never stopped trying for a team, they just wanted a major sports team to call their own, didn’t matter what league. Nashville had tried to woo the Sacramento Kings into coming, but that also didn't work.
The City of Nashville finally got their wish in 1997, when businessman Craig Leipold(currently owns the Wild) made a formal presentation to the NHL for an expansion team in Nashville. The NHL accepted the proposal, officially announcing the cities of Columbus, Ohio, Atlanta, Georgia, Minneapolis–Saint Paul, Minnesota and Nashville Tennessee, as the next cities for expansion. This expansion phase would be slightly unusual as each team would begin their first season at a different than the other, with Nashville beginning play in 98-99 as the earliest and the Columbus Blue Jackets and Minnesota Wild starting in 2000-2001. This was due to Nashville having an available arena right away and selling the NHL required 12,000 tickets before the deadline of March 31st, 1998.
The then-nameless Nashville team held a naming contest to name them, the three “best” fan names were: "Ice Tigers," "Fury" and "Attack." Leipold threw the name “Predators” into the mix, which honestly sounded better than anything else.

First Years

The Predators played their first game on October 10th, 1998, playing their first game against the Florida Panthers, losing 1-0. Of their first five home games, it was the only sold out game. Three nights later, they secured their first home win in a 3-2 win over the Carolina Hurricanes, with Forward Andrew Brunette scoring the first goal in franchise history. It was a goal that almost didn’t count, due to Dave Karpa shoving the Hurricanes net off its moorings, to prevent a goal. Karpa who famously tried to beat up Mike Foligno(Dad to Nick and Marcus) and failed. The puck had never entered the net, because Karpa unmoored the net, which led to a review, with a factor determining factors of “is this a goal?”
Did Karpa intentionally remove the net from the moorings? (Yes)
Had the net not been removed, would the puck have crossed the goal line? This is the real mind boggler, which Referee Dennis LaRue had to figure out. After about 5 minutes, the call came down from Toronto declaring it a good goal, leading to celebrations from the Predators on the ice and a remixed version of “I like it, I love it”(Fits Nashville perfectly) from Tim Mcgraw to start blasting all throughout the arena.
Was it a beautiful goal? Far from it, who even knows if that puck would have crossed the line if not for Karpa, but Karpa essentially cost his team the game. As far as I know, no footage exists of this. I've tried to find footage, I've asked Reddit for help, but no one seems to be able to find it, shame really. So instead enjoy random highlights and footage, I guess?
They finished their season with a 28–47–7 record, good for second-last in the Western Conference. At the draft that year, the Predators drafted Goaltender Brian Finley with the 6th overall pick. Finley was a massive bust, playing only 6 NHL games in his career, allowing 10 goals in 107 minutes. Wasn’t all bad, he won a Calder with the Milwaukee Admirals in ‘04 at least. Of the fifteen players picked in 1999, 3 players(Hall, 682, Hutchinson, 148, Erat, 881) played at least 100 games, with the rest playing a combined 53 games.
Their second season was about the same, for a new expansion team. They finished last in the West(behind Calgary), it’s not like they weren’t trying, NHL Expansion was designed to give you barely anything(before Vegas), if your GM couldn’t build a team(Florida, Atlanta) or your owner was an idiot(Florida, Atlanta), you were never going to draw in fans. The old Expansion rules were set up to make you lose, they didn’t want you to succeed right away, because “we don’t want to give up our best guys!”.
Before I get into the relocation talks, I will mention the Japan games. To start the 00-01 season, the Predators and Penguins played 2 games in Japan, in front of sold out crowds(Game 1 was, 13,849, Game 2 was 13,426) marking the highest attended hockey games in Japanese history. Both won a game, but it’s a shame the NHL never really bothered with Japan. I can’t really find any high quality footage, so enjoy the blurry mess. Seriously it is nearly impossible to find any video footage of Nashville from this timeframe.

The Hamilton...Predators?

For some time now, Leipold had been attempting to sell the team. And it almost happened, Jim Balsillie of Research in Motion(Blackberry), had been attempting to buy a team for years now, famously trying to get the Penguins from Lemieux in 2006, which went nowhere. Allegedly part of the sale was a set of conditions attached to it, namely, he could not simply relocate the Penguins upon purchase. He had to explore every possible option to make the Penguins work. Balsillie moved on from trying to buy the Penguins and set his sights onto the Predators.
Nashville was in a bad state. Nobody showed up to games, even with the league’s cheapest ticket prices, even with amassing 110 points(3rd place!) in 06, nobody cared. Leipold was losing $70 million at least and was ready to bail. It seems like he was ok with them being relocated, as he couldn’t make it work in Nashville, but then he pulled out of a deal to relocate the team. Most likely because the tactics being used to relocate them were horrible. Enacting a clause with the arena to more or less do what the Browns did and leave in the dead of night. Balsillie's group had tried everything possible to get him to sell, so that Balsillie could move them to Hamilton ASAP.
(Seriously, it was suggested to Leipold he engage in bad-faith negotiations with the city, so that he could move the team under the cover of night.)
There were a lot of issues with this possible relocation to Hamilton, Ontario that Balsillie wanted:
Copps Coliseum(Now FirstOntario Centre) would have been the home of the hypothetical “Hamilton Predators' ', the arena was previously host to the Hamilton Canucks and then Bulldogs, of the AHL in the 90s and currently hosts the Hamilton Bulldogs of the OHL. For Copps to have hosted an NHL team they would have needed massive renovations. I don’t just mean “Expand the seating”, it would be on the scale of Keyarena in Seattle, the arena has the seating for NHL, but the facilities are not up to the NHL Standard. Balsillie is no stranger to spending money(worth $800 million currently), but who would finance the renovations? City of Hamilton owns the arena, so would it be Balsillie or the Taxpayers? And this is not going into the actual renovation fees, along with relocation fees, would he be willing to pay all of that?
Simply put, this means that the NHL cannot approve or deny Balsillie’s attempts to relocate the franchise, without the Board convening. This is because he had never submitted an application(according to Bettman), so the Board can't really talk about it. He was jumping the gun on everything, because he thought it was a surefire deal.
And the biggest reason of all?:
The Leafs pretty much have a claim over all of Ontario(especially nearby Hamilton) as their territory and would most likely not approve of a team setting up shop in essentially their backyard. As we learned with the Whalers, teams don’t like having competition in their territory. To this end, the Buffalo Sabres would also deny a Hamilton team, due to the Niagara area accounting for 12% of their ticket sales.*
That being said, the Leafs would most likely see increased revenue from a second “Battle of Ontario”, as Hamilton is literally a hop skip and a jump away from Toronto, compared to the 4 hours of Ottawa. So they may have actually okayed it in the end, but I find it hard to believe Buffalo would have actually okayed a move that would lose them season ticket holders.

Could Hamilton even support a team?

The problem with Hamilton is, it’s just on the border of Leafs Nation, but if given the choice between the Leafs(in the middle of being awful) and the Predators(also awful, but not as much), the people will still choose the Leafs, because this part of the province is “Leafs Nation”, you’re not going to make new fans here, you’ll essentially be having a building filled to the brim with Leafs fans during any game against them. Most likely it would be the same with Sabres fans and quite possibly Senators fans. This is the underlying issue with expanding to Ontario(or I guess Quebec City), you won’t be getting new fans. There’s a group that’s already crazy for hockey, but any real growth will not happen in a short timespan. Growth would take years(at least a decade maybe?) to get people to actually support this team, especially considering they’ve never won more than a game in the playoffs at this point. Yes Canada loves hockey, but in a market on the edge of "Leafs Nation" I don't know if this would be a great idea.
Would the city of Hamilton actually turn out and support the Predators, besides for games against the Leafs? That’s the real question I think. Because against the Leafs, you’ll get a full house, it doesn’t matter if the Leafs are in the middle of an undefeated streak or 20-game losing streak, people show up in droves to watch the Leafs. Sure Toronto might okay it, but would Buffalo? They would essentially be losing a good portion of their season ticket holders to a team who would probably have trouble filling the building on a nightly basis.
All of this being said, it seems like the NHL was operating on an “Anyone But Balsillie” policy. They didn’t want him to become an owner, maybe it was because Bettman was against relocation, unless it absolutely was necessary(see: Thrashers), or most likely it was because Balsillie was...untrustworthy, from the get go he had been trying to buy teams(Pittsburgh, Nashville, Phoenix, probably Atlanta? Buffalo), so he could relocate them to Hamilton. Keep in mind he never had a solid Hamilton plan, it was just "Buy Team, Relocate to Hamilton, ????, Profit" He had no arena lease, no idea if people would even get season tickets. He had nothing.
From some research it becomes clear to me that the reason Leipold pulled away from selling to Balsillie is that Balsillie did something wrong. Here Leipold describes Hasille “He’s untrustworthy. He’s deceiving. He’s arrogant. He’s a person who doesn’t know how to be a partner in our business,” What did Balsillie do exactly? We don’t know, but it’s very possible that it’s due to him selling season tickets for a team that:
Balsillie did not care, he said he started selling tickets(without the NHL’s approval and without an application to the BoG) not to “demonstrate his support for Nashville”(as he claims), he wanted to make them and by extension the NHL, look like massive idiots(Though to be fair, they do that on their own). Balsillie was mad that Leipold called off the deal and decided this would be a way to stroke his ego, basically. In fact Gary Bettman was furious with Balsillie over this, saying in an interview, “He didn’t have an application pending to relocate,” “He didn’t even have a valid contract to buy the franchise. What he did here was completely out of line.” From the very beginning, Balsillie's goal has been to get a team in Hamilton, be it the Penguins, Predators, or the Coyotes(this one is such a fucking mess), he would stop at nothing to get what he wanted, be it through backroom deals to get Jerry Moyes(Coyotes) to declare bankruptcy, so he could swoop in and buy the Coyotes or more “official” means. Balsillie even tried suing the league at one point, which made him an even bigger laughing stock, calling the NHL an "illegal cartel" because the Leafs hold claim over the GTA.

New Owners

The relocation rumors didn’t stop with Hamilton, oh no. William "Boots" Del Biaggio III entered the picture, attempting to buy the Predators and move them to Kansas City’s brand new Sprint Center arena, he had tried this with the Penguins and that also failed. This ended up going nowhere. Despite EVERYTHING, the constant rumors of relocation to Hamilton or Kansas City or to Vegas(this was more of a “This is what the NHL wants” theory), local groups suddenly were interested in keeping the team in Nashville, with a rally headed by a group calling themselves “Our Team Nashville”(compromised mostly of local business owners) held a rally at Sommet Center(Bridgestone / Nashville Arena) with around 7,500 fans, selling the equivalent of about 726 season tickets.
After negotiations with the City of Nashville a local group(same one?) headed by David Freeman and William Del Biaggio(minority owner), bought the Nashville Predators from Craig Leipold to the tune of $172 Million, this included paying off a $61 million debt and $2.2 million in fees and expenses. Del Biaggio would get a minority stake in the team, of around 27%, with the local buyers holding a 73% stake, meaning the Predators would stay in Nashville. This would not last, as in 2008 Del Biaggio would file for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy, due to unpaid loans. It was alleged he used fraudulent loans to buy his stake in the Predators, prompting an FBI investigation. He was then charged and sentenced to 97 months(8.8 Years). His stake in the Predators was promptly sold off by a trustee(no idea to who) and that was the end of Del Biaggio in Hockey.
Freeman eventually stepped down as chairman of the Predators in favor of Thomas Cigarran(the current Chairman / owner), although there was a $250 million lawsuit, by Freeman alleging that Cigarran had diluted his share, by not informing him of capital calls and he had not received loan guaranty fees that the group had agreed to paid him. What does this mean? I don’t know! But it was sent to court-ordered arbitration in 2016, with Bettman supervising, so we will never know what happened, due to it being private. Suffice to say, for now at least, their ownership woes are history that does not need repeating.
Balisille tried to buy the Sabres at some point, presumably to move them to Hamilton, which isn’t the dumbest idea. If Buffalo is unwilling to allow an expansion team in their backyard, he’ll just buy them. It’s so genius, that it’s bound to work! Except it didn’t work and he still looked like an idiot.

So what changed?

I really am not sure, I’m neither a Nashville fan or a Nashville resident, but it seems like ownership began spending, got people to actually care and got some good players to help make this team slightly more successful. Going into the 10’s they were valued at around $163 million, coming into this decade it’s in the ballpark of $425 million, which is still one of the least valuable franchises(keep in mind, this is from 2018) in the league, but not to the point where they’re hemorrhaging money. Whatever the Predators have done to win local support, I welcome it, Nashville can work as a market, Balisille would have relocated the team as soon as he had control of them, failing that he would have tanked their value(on and off the ice) so that he could relocate them. Balisille was a snake, that was proven when he later sued the NHL and got laughed out of court(basically.)
As for Nashville themselves, the fanbase has grown and they've begun looking like what the NHL had hoped would happen out there, an actual viable market, sure they're not incredibly valuable, but for a small market team they're doing extremely well. They got through their ownership woes and relocation fears and turned things around.
Will Hamilton ever get a team? Probably not, Kitchener / Waterloo was also explored as an option to move the Penguins to and that never went anywhere. The NHL is adamant about no relocation, they don't want it happening unless it has to, unlike say the NFL, where it's normal. Nashville is safe and as long as they have good ownership and a fanbase that supports them, they won't be going anywhere. The Predators will go down as a good example on "How to bring Hockey to the South", but the road to that is rocky, it's far from easy.
Small Edit: If you want to see a specific topic covered, leave a comment and I'll look into it.
submitted by KikiFlowers to hockey [link] [comments]


2020.01.06 09:12 bookseller10 Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-4)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes, and Systems, 6th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  2. Precalculus Essentials: J. S. Ratti & Marcus S. McWaters
  3. Genetics- A Conceptual Approach, 6th edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  4. The Global Casino, Fifth Edition: An Introduction to Environmental Issues: Nick Middleton
  5. Macroeconomics, 2nd Canadian Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells & Iris Au
  6. Biology: A Global Approach, 10th edition: Neil A. Campbell & Jane B. Reece & Lisa Urry & Michael L Cain & Steven A Wasserman & Author
  7. Information Technology Project Management, 5th Edition: Jack T. Marchewka
  8. Clinical Laboratory Hematology, 3rd Global Edition: Shirlyn B. Kenzie & Lynne Williams
  9. Exploring Medical Language, 10th edition: Myrna LaFleur Brooks & Danielle LaFleur Brooks
  10. Business Essentials, Eighth Canadian Edition: Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin & Frederick A. Starke & George Dracopoulos
  11. Chemistry Atoms First, 3rd edition: Julia Burdge & Jason Overby
  12. Sensation and Perception, 2nd edition: Steven Yantis & Richard Abrams
  13. Abnormal Psychology, 8th Global Edition: Thomas F. Oltmanns & Robert E. Emery
  14. Documentation Manual for Occupational Therapy, 4th edition : Crystal A. Gateley & Sherry Borcherding
  15. Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement, 13th edition: Michelle A. Green
  16. Java For Everyone: Compatible with Java 5, 6, and 7, 2nd Edition: Cay S. Horstmann
  17. Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application, 9th edition: Bessie L. Marquis & Carol J. Huston
  18. Economics: The User's Guide: Ha-Joon Chang
  19. Gendered Lives, 12th edition: Julia T. Wood & Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz
  20. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  21. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  22. Calculus - Early Transcendentals, 8th edition: James Stewart
  23. Willard and Spackman's Occupational Therapy, 12th edition: Barbara A. Schell & Marjorie Scaffa & Glen Gillen & Ellen S. Cohn
  24. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th edition: M. Morris Mano
  25. Principles of Risk Management and Insurance, 13th Global Edition: George E. Rejda & Michael McNamara
  26. Community & Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Public's Health, 9th edition: Cherie Rector
  27. Environmental Science for AP®, Second Edition: Andrew Friedland & Rick Relyea
  28. College Algebra, 4th Edition: Cynthia Y. Young
  29. Sustainable Urban Development Reader (Routledge Urban Reader Series), 3rd Edition: Wheeler and Beatly
  30. Psychiatric Nursing: Assessment, Care Plans, and Medications, 9th edition: Townsend, Mary
  31. Managing Business Process Flows (3rd Edition): Ravi Anupindi
  32. Precalculus, 10th edition: Michael Sullivan
  33. Psychology in Your Life (Second Edition): Sarah Grison & Todd Heatherton & Michael Gazzaniga
  34. Introductory Algebra, 12th edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  35. American History: Connecting with the Past-Vol 2: Alan Brinkley
  36. Cities of the World: Regional Patterns and Urban Environments, 6th edition: Brunn, Stanley D.; Hays-Mitchell, Maureen; Zeigler, Donald J.
  37. Strategies for Successful Writing, 11th edition: James A. Reinking & Robert A. von der Osten
  38. College Algebra with Modeling & Visualization, 6th edition: Gary K. Rockswold
  39. Understanding Psychology (11th Edition): Tony Morris
  40. Understanding ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS: A Worktext, 3rd edition: Mary Jo Bowie
  41. Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief 6th edition: Carol Berkin & Christopher Miller & Robert Cherny & James Gormly & Douglas Egerton
  42. Crossroads and Cultures, Volume II: Since 1300: A History of the World's Peoples: Bonnie G. Smith & Marc Van De Mieroop & Richard von Glahn & Kris Lane
  43. Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 4th edition: Joan L. Slonczewski & John W. Foster
  44. Web Design: Introductory (HTML), 4th edition: Gary B. Shelly & Jennifer T. Campbell
  45. Problems from Philosophy, 3rd Edition: James Rachels & Stuart Rachels
  46. Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America (Fourth Edition): John Charles Chasteen
  47. Data Structures and Algorithms Using Java: William McAllister
  48. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, 6th edition: Edward Allen & Joseph Iano
  49. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 7th edition: Douglas A. Skoog & F. James Holler & Stanley R. Crouch
  50. Hands-On Microsoft Windows Server 2016, 2nd Edition: Michael Palmer
  51. A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists, 6th edition: Fred Beisse
  52. The World A History, Volume One (3rd Edition): Felipe Fernández-Armesto
  53. Discovering the Life Span, 4th edition: Robert S. Feldman
  54. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  55. Ethics for the Information Age, 7th Edition: Michael J. Quinn
  56. Human Communication in Society, 4th edition: Jess K. Alberts & Thomas K. Nakayama & Judith N. Martin
  57. Traditions and Encounters Vol 1 (History), 6th edition: Jerry Bentley
  58. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  59. Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions, 6th edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  60. Diversity Consciousness: Opening Our Minds to People, Cultures, and Opportunities, 4th edition: Richard D. Bucher
  61. MCSA Guide to Administering Microsoft Windows Server 2012/R2, Exam 70-411: Greg Tomsho
  62. Your Office: Microsoft Excel 2016 Comprehensive (Your Office for Office 2016 Series): Amy S. Kinser & Kristyn Jacobson & Eric Kinser & Brant Paige Moriarity
  63. Principles of Macroeconomics (Second Edition): Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  64. Veterinary Surgery: Small Animal Expert Consult: 2-Volume Set, 2nd edition: Spencer A. Johnston
  65. College Algebra, 7th edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  66. Certified Paralegal Review Manual: A Practical Guide to CP Exam Preparation, 4th edition: Virginia Koerselman Newman
  67. American Government: Power and Purpose (Fourteenth Core Edition): Stephen Ansolabehere & Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Kenneth A. Shepsle
  68. Numerical Analysis, 10th edition: Richard L. Burden & J. Douglas Faires & Annette M. Burden
  69. The Mechanical Design Process, 5th edition: David G. Ullman
  70. Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development, 6th edition: Rowntree,Lewis, Price & Wyckoff
  71. The Old Testament Story (9th Edition): John Tullock
  72. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams
  73. Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints, 6th edition: Robert H. Seller & Andrew B. Symons
  74. The Litigation Paralegal: A Systems Approach, 6th edition: James W. H. McCord & Pamela Tepper
  75. Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law (Aspen Casebook), 4th edition: Lisa G. Lerman & Philip G. Schrag
  76. Principles of Auditing & Other Assurance Services, 20th edition: O. Ray Whittington, Kurt Pany
  77. Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th edition: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating: Rhea Paul & Courtenay Norbury
  78. Organisational Behaviour Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Australasian Edition: Wood, Jack; Zeffane, Rachid M.; Fromholtz, Michele
  79. Essentials of Corporate Finance, 9th Edition: Stephen A. Ross, Randolph W. Westerfield, Bradford D. Jordan
  80. Development of Children, 7th edition: Cynthia Lightfoot
  81. Asian Art: Marika Sardar & Dorinda Neave & Lara C. W. Blanchard
  82. Macroeconomics (6th Edition): R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony P. O'Brien
  83. Electron Flow in Organic Chemistry: A Decision-Based Guide to Organic Mechanisms (2nd Edition): Scudder, Paul H.(Author)
  84. Biochemistry, 1st edition: Roger L. Miesfeld & Megan M. McEvoy
  85. Stress Management for Life: A Research-Based Experiential Approach, 4th edition: Michael Olpin & Margie Hesson
  86. Engineering Fundamentals: An Introduction to Engineering, 5th edition: Saeed Moaveni
  87. Articulation and Phonological Disorders: Speech Sound Disorders in Children (8th Edition): John E. Bernthal & Nicholas W. Bankson & Peter Flipsen Jr.
  88. Communication in a Civil Society: Shelley D. Lane & Ruth Anne Abigail & John Gooch
  89. The Immune System, 4th Edition: Peter Parham
  90. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 4th edition: Anthony J. Hayter
  91. Social Psychology: The Science of Everyday Life: Jeff Greenberg & Toni Schmader & Jamie Arndt & Mark Landau
  92. Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition: Talaro
  93. Business Analysis and Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 5th edition: Krishna Palepu & Paul Healy
  94. Introductory Chemistry, 8th Edition: Steven S. Zumdahl & Donald J. Decoste
  95. Single Variable Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition: James Stewart
  96. Foundations of Education, Third Edition: Volume I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments: Various
  97. Campbell Essential Biology with Physiology, 5th Global Edition: Eric J. Simon & Jean L. Dickey & Jane B. Reece & Kelly A. Hogan
  98. Mastering the World of Psychology, 5th edition: Ellen Green Wood & Samuel E. Wood & Denise Boyd
  99. Business Data Networks and Security (10th Edition): Raymond R. Panko & Julia L. Panko
  100. America's History, Volume I: To 1877, 8th edition: James A. Henretta & Eric Hinderaker & Rebecca Edwards & Robert O. Self
  101. Investigating Social Problems: A. Javier Trevino
  102. Tropical Ecosystems and Ecological Concepts, 2nd edition: Patrick Osborne
  103. Read, Reason, Write, 11 Edition: Dorothy Seyler
  104. MGMT (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press) 10th Edition: Chuck Williams
  105. MLA Handbook, 8th edition: The Modern Language Association of America
  106. The Game Design Reader: A Rules of Play Anthology (MIT Press): Katie Salen Tekinba & Eric Zimmerman
  107. American Politics Today, 5th Core edition: William T. Bianco & David T. Canon
  108. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 3rd edition: Clark Spencer Larsen
  109. Awakening: An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought, 5th Edition: Patrick S. Bresnan
  110. Discovering Computers ©2016 (Shelly Cashman Series): Misty E. Vermaat & Susan L. Sebok & Steven M. Freund & Jennifer T. Campbell & Mark Frydenberg
  111. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance (4th Edition): Jonathan Berk & Peter Demarzo & Jarrad Harford
  112. Human Anatomy & Physiology, 9th/10th edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Katja N. Hoehn
  113. Structural Analysis (9th Edition): Russell C. Hibbeler
  114. Hydrology and Hydraulic Systems, 4th edition: Ram Gupta
  115. Between One and Many: The Art and Science of Public Speaking, 7th edition: Steven R. Brydon & Michael D Scott
  116. Logic: The Essentials: Patrick J. Hurley
  117. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Volume I, 14th edition: Fred S Kleiner
  118. Paralegal Professional: The Essentials, 5th edition: Thomas F. Goldman & Henry R. Cheeseman
  119. Chemistry: Structure and Properties, 2nd edition: Nivaldo J. Tro
  120. Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport (B&B Physical Education),10th Edition: Angela Lumpkin
  121. Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  122. American Government, 2014 Elections and Updates Edition: Karen J. O'Connor & Larry J. Sabato & Alixandra B. Yanus
  123. Nutrition: Science and Applications, 4th Edition: Lori A. Smolin & Mary B. Grosvenor
  124. Experiential Approach to Organization Development, 8th edition: Brown, Donald R
  125. How to Work a Room, 25th Anniversary Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Making Lasting Connections--In Person and Online: Susan RoAne
  126. The Creative Spirit: An Introduction to Theatre, 6th edition: Stephanie Arnold
  127. The Philosopher's Way, 5th edition: John Chaffee
  128. Problem Solving with C++, 9th edition: Walter Savitch
  129. Skills for Success with Office 2016 Volume 1 (Skills for Success for Office 2016 Series): Margo Chaney Adkins & Lisa Hawkins & Catherine Hain & Stephanie Murre-Wolf
  130. The Physics of Everyday Phenomena, Eighth Edition: W. Thomas Griffith & Juliet W. Brosing
  131. Precalculus, 6th edition: Margaret L. Lial & John Hornsby & David I. Schneider & Callie J. Daniels
  132. Starting Out with Programming Logic & Design, Fourth Edition: Tony Gaddis
  133. MKTG11, 11th Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair & Carl McDaniel
  134. The Business Writer's Companion, 8th edition: Gerald J. Alred & Charles T. Brusaw & Walter E. Oliu
  135. America: A Concise History, Volume 2, 6th edition: James Henretta
  136. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: David C. Colander
  137. Psychology, 11th edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  138. American Education: A History, 5th edition: Jennings L. Wagoner Jr. & Wayne J. Urban
  139. Give Me Liberty! An American History, Seagull 5th edition-Vol 1: Eric Foner
  140. Anthropology: The Human Challenge, 15th edition: William A. Haviland & Harald E. L. Prins & Dana Walrath & Bunny McBride
  141. Lifespan Development, 7th edition: Denise Boyd & Helen Bee
  142. Essentials of Database Management: Jeffrey A. Hoffer & Heikki Topi & Venkataraman Ramesh
  143. GOVT8 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press), 8th edition: Edward Sidlow & Beth Henschen
  144. Horngren's Accounting: The Managerial Chapters (11th Edition): Tracie L. Miller-Nobles & Brenda L. Mattison & Ella Mae Matsumura
  145. Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Context, 3rd edition: Stephen Orvis & Carol Ann Drogus
  146. Experience Psychology, 3rd Edition: Laura A. King
  147. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd Edition: Dan O’Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  148. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics, 9th edition: Raymond A. Serway & John W. Jewett
  149. The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology, 5th Edition: Kerry Ferris & Jill Stein
  150. Biological Science, 6th edition: Scott Freeman & Kim Quillin & Lizabeth Allison & Michael Black & Emily Taylor & Greg Podgorski & Jeff Carmichael
  151. Communication: Embracing Difference, 4th edition: Daniel M. Dunn & Lisa J. Goodnight
  152. A Sequence for Academic Writing, 7th edition: Laurence Behrens & Leonard Rosen
  153. Guide to Operating Systems, 5th edition: Greg Tomsho
  154. THiNK, 4th Edition: Judith Boss
  155. Principles of Economics, 8th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  156. Shelly Cashman Series Discovering Computers & Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2016: A Fundamental Combined Approach: Jennifer T. Campbell
  157. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature Of Matter And Change, Eighth Edition: Martin S. Silberberg, Patricia G. Amateis
  158. Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services, 5th edition: Jerry V. Diller
  159. Social Psychology, 10th edition: Saul Kassin
  160. Our Sexuality, 13th edition: Robert Crooks & Karla Baur
  161. Professional Nursing Concepts: Competencies for Quality Leadership, 3rd Edition: Finkelman, Anita & Kenner, Carole
  162. Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 3rd Edition: Kyle, Theresa & Ricci, Susan & Carman, Susan
  163. Psychology, 4th edition: Schacter, Daniel L. & Gilbert, Daniel T. & Nock, Matthew K. & Wegner, Daniel M.
  164. 21st Century Astronomy, 5th edition: Laura Kay, Stacy Palen & George Blumenthal
  165. Calculus, 11th edition: Ron Larson
  166. Surface Water-Quality Monitoring: Steven C. Chapra
  167. Pearson's Federal Taxation 2018, Comprehensive: Thomas R. Pope
  168. Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th edition: Thomas L. Wheelen
  169. Bankruptcy Law and Practice: Grace A. Luppino J.D
  170. Family Law for the Paralegal, 3rd edition: Mary E. Wilson
  171. Successful Writing at Work, 10th edition: Philip C. Kolin
  172. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Dan O'Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  173. Intimate Relationships, 7th Edition: Rowland Miller
  174. Software Engineering, 10th edition: Ian Sommerville
  175. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics, Structure, and Change, 10th edition: Peter Atkins & Julio de Paula
  176. Educational Research: Competencies for Analysis and Applications (11th Edition): Geoffrey E. Mills & L. R. Gay
  177. At a Glance: Writing Essays and Beyond, 6th edition: Lee Brandon
  178. Delmar’s Standard Textbook of Electricity, 6th edition: Stephen L. Herman
  179. Psychology, 5th edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli
  180. Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 15th Edition: Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl
  181. The Little Seagull Handbook, 3rd Edition: Richard Bullock, Michal Brody & Francine Weinberg
  182. STAT 2: Building Models for a World of Data: Ann R. Cannon
  183. Interplay-The Process of Interpersonal Communication, 13th edition: Ronald Adler
  184. SELL 5 (New, Engaging Titles From 4LTR Press), 5th edition: Thomas N. Ingram & Raymond (buddy) W. Laforge & Ramon A. Avila & Charles H. Schwepker & Michael R. Williams
  185. Marketing Channels, 8th edition: Bert Rosenbloom
  186. The Changing Earth: Exploring Geology and Evolution, 7th Edition: James S. Monroe & Reed Wicander
  187. Applied Regression Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, 3rd edition: John Fox
  188. Development Economics: Debraj Ray
  189. Organic Chemistry, 9th edition: Leroy G. Wade
  190. A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 9th edition: Jan A. Pechenik
  191. DSP First, 2nd Edition: McClellan, Schafer & Yoder
  192. Epidemiology, 5th Edition: Leon Gordis
  193. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Edition: Dee Unglaub Silverthorn
  194. Essentials of Sociology 12th edition: James M. Henslin
  195. Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th edition: Jacqueline Burchum & Laura Rosenthal
  196. Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives, 6th edition: Michael E. Kraft & Scott R. Furlong
  197. Financial Management: Principles and Applications (12th Edition): Sheridan Titman & Arthur J. Keown
  198. Animal Physiology, 4th Edition: Richard W. Hill
  199. Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy (5th Edition): Robert W. Bauman
  200. Understanding Basic Statistics, 7th edition: Charles Henry Brase & Corrinne Pellillo Brase
  201. Organic Chemistry: Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual, 3rd edition: David Klein
  202. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 11th edition: Howard Anton, Irl Bivens & Stephen Davis
  203. An Introduction to Student–Involved Assessment FOR Learning, 7th edition: Jan Chappuis & Rick Stiggins
  204. The Bedford Researcher with 2016 MLA Update, 5th edition: Mike Palmquist
  205. Roots of the Western Tradition: A Short History of the Ancient World, 8th edition: Guy Rogers & C. Warren Hollister
  206. Contemporary Logistics, 12th edition: Paul R. Murphy & A. Michael Knemeyer
  207. Personal Finance, 13th edition: E. Thomas Garman
  208. C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 8th Edition: D. S. Malik
  209. Information Systems Today: Managing in the Digital World, 7th edition: Joseph Valacich & Christoph Schneider
  210. New Products Management, 11th Edition: Merle Crawford & Anthony Di Benedetto
  211. A World of Ideas, 10th Edition: Lee A. Jacobus
  212. Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control: Terry L.M. Bartelt
  213. We the People: An Introduction to American Politics 11th Essentials edition: Benjamin Ginsberg, et al.
  214. Wardlaw's Contemporary Nutrition, 10th edition: Anne Smith & Angela Collene
  215. Technical Communication, 14th Edition: John M. Lannon
  216. Electronics Fundamentals: A Systems Approach: Thomas L. Floyd & David M. Buchla
  217. Discrete-Event System Simulation, 5th edition: Jerry Banks & John S. Carson & Barry L. Nelson & David M. Nicol
  218. Engaging Social Welfare: An Introduction to Policy Analysis: Mark J. Stern
  219. Social Welfare Policy and Advocacy: Advancing Social Justice through 8 Policy Sectors: Bruce S. Jansson
  220. Foundations of Astronomy, 12th edition: Michael A. Seeds & Dana Backman
  221. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: Volume: 1 (Concise Edition): Elizabeth Pollard & Clifford Rosenberg & Robert Tignor
  222. The Art of Public Speaking, 12th Edition: Stephen E. Lucas
  223. Genetic Essentials: Concepts and Conncections, 3rd edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  224. Prosthodontic Treatment for Edentulous Patients: Complete Dentures and Implant-Supported Prostheses, 13th edition: George A. Zarb & John Hobkirk & Steven Eckert & Rhonda Jacob
  225. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 9th edition: Robert Jurmain & Lynn Kilgore & Wenda Trevathan
  226. The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook with 2016 MLA Update: Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin & Francine Weinberg
  227. Biochemistry: Concepts and Connections: Dean R. Appling & Spencer J. Anthony-Cahill
  228. The Basic Practice of Statistics, 7th edition: David S. Moore & William I. Notz & Michael A. Fligner
  229. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd edition: GEORGE YOUNG and William Hopwood
  230. Macroeconomics, 4th edition: Charles I. Jones
  231. Web Development and Design Foundations with HTML5, 8th edition: Terry Ann Felke-Morris, Ed.D
  232. Invitation to Public Speaking - National Geographic Edition, 5th Edition: Cindy L. Griffin
  233. Marketing: the Core, 6th edition: Roger A. Kerin, Steven W. Hartley
  234. Development: Infancy Through Adolescence: Laurence Steinberg and Deborah Lowe Vandell
  235. Sports Economics: Roger D. Blair
  236. Quick & Easy Medical Terminology, 8th edition: Peggy C. Leonard
  237. Legal Research and Writing for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 8th edition: Deborah E. Bouchoux
  238. Evidence for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 5th edition: Joelyn D. Marlowe
  239. Criminal Law, 12th edition: Joel Samaha
  240. Natural Resource Economics: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Barry C. Field
  241. Learning with LabVIEW, 1st Edition: Robert H. Bishop
  242. Methods in Behavioral Research, 12th edition: Paul C. Cozby & Scott C. Bates
  243. Contemporary Human Behavior Theory: A Critical Perspective for Social Work , 3rd edition: Susan P. Robbins
  244. Managerial Accounting for Managers, 4th edition: Eric Noreen
  245. Basic Marketing Research: Using Microsoft Excel Data Analysis, 3rd Edition: Alvin Burns & Ronald Bush
  246. Dosage Calculations Made Incredibly Easy! (Incredibly Easy! Series®), 5th edition: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  247. Fundamentals of Financial Management, 14th edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Joel F. Houston
  248. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture, 5th edition: Richard J. Payne
  249. FOCUS on Community College Success, 4th edition: Constance Staley
  250. The American Promise, Value Edition, Volume 2, 7th edition: James L. Roark & Michael P. Johnson & Patricia Cline Cohen & Sarah Stage & Susan M. Hartmann
  251. The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, 11th Edition: Frederic S. Mishkin
  252. Management, 14th edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & Joseph J. Martocchio & Lori K. Long
  253. Organizational Behavior, 17th edition: Stephen P. Robbins
  254. Race and Ethnicity: The United States and the World (2nd Edition): Scupin, Raymond, Ph.D
  255. Entrepreneurial Small Business, 5th edition: Jerome A. Katz & Richard P. Green II
  256. Teaching Discipline-Specific Literacies in Grades 6-12: Preparing Students for College, Career, and Workforce Demands: Vicky I. Zygouris-Coe
  257. Human Development A Cultural Approach (2nd Edition): Jeffrey J. Arnett
  258. Listening to Music, 8th edition: Craig Wright
  259. Work in the 21st Century, 5th edition: Frank J. Landy
  260. Principles of Microeconomics, 8th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  261. Strategic Management: Text and Cases (Irwin Management), 8th Edition: Gregory G Dess Dr. and Gerry McNamara
  262. Essentials of Sociology, 2nd edition: George Ritzer
  263. Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, 7th Edition: John Perry & Michael Bratman
  264. Real Estate Development - 5th Edition: Principles and Process: Mike E. Miles & Laurence M. Netherton & Adrienne Schmitz
  265. Real Estate Finance & and Investments, 15th edition: William Brueggeman
  266. A First Course in Differential Equations with Modeling Applications, 11th edition: Dennis G. Zill
  267. The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, 10th edition: James W. Zubrick
  268. Administration of Wills, Trusts and Estates, 5th edition: Gordon Brown & Scott Myers
  269. Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years (Early Childhood Education Series): Judy Harris Helm & Lilian G. Katz
  270. Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 8th Edition: Halliday & Resnick & Walker
  271. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 2nd Edition: Weygandt & Kimmel & Kieso
  272. College Algebra, 6th edition: Mark Dugopolski
  273. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture: Volume Two, Brief 4th Edition : Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  274. Society: The Basics, 14th Edition: John J Macionis
  275. M: Marketing, 5th Edition: Dhruv Grewal, Michael Levy
  276. Mass Media and American Politics, 10th edition: Doris A. Graber & Johanna L. Dunaway
  277. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  278. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 E-Book: 5 Books in 1 (Ferri's Medical Solutions): Fred F. Ferri
  279. Organic Chemistry, 5th Edition: Janice Gorzynski Smith
  280. COMM4 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press): Kathleen S. Verderber, Deanna D. Sellnow & Rudolph F. Verderber
  281. The Theatre Experience, 13th edition: Edwin Wilson
  282. Mcknight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 12th edition: Darrel Hess & Dennis Tasa
  283. Intermediate Algebra, 12th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  284. Strategic Management Concept, 3rd Edition: Frank Rothaermel
  285. Moral Issues in Business, 13th edition: William H. Shaw
  286. Marketing 2016, 18th edition: William M. Pride & O. C. Ferrell
  287. Experiencing the World's Religions: Tradition, Challenge, and Change, 6th Edition: Michael Molloy
  288. Fundamentals of Cost Accounting, 5th edition: William N. Lanen, Shannon W. Anderson, Michael W. Maher
  289. Motivational Interviewing in Health Care: Helping Patients Change Behavior (Applications of Motivational Interviewing): Stephen Rollnick & William R. Miller & Christopher C. Butler
  290. Community and Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 1st edition: Gail A. Harkness & Rosanna DeMarco
  291. Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations, 6th Edition: Mary A. Nies & Melanie McEwen
  292. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart, 4th Edition, Volume One: Robert Tignor
  293. Microeconomics: Theory & Applications, 12th edition: Edgar K. Browning
  294. CCNA Routing and Switching ICND2 200-105 Official Cert Guide, Academic Edition: Wendell Odom
  295. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 11th edition: Ross & Westerfield & Jordan
  296. Daniels and Worthingham's Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination and Performance Testing (Daniels & Worthington's Muscle Testing (Hislop)), 9th Edition: Helen Hislop & Dale Avers & Marybeth Brown
  297. Worlds Together Worlds Apart, 4th Edition , Volume Two: Robert Tignor & Jeremy Adelman
  298. Human Relations for Career and Personal Success, Concepts, Applications, and Skills, 11th edition: Andrew J. DuBrin
  299. The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, 6th edition: Leigh Ryan & Lisa Zimmerelli
  300. Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 16th edition: Joel Feinberg & Russ Shafer-Landau
  301. Environment and You, The (2nd Edition): Norm Christensen & Lissa Leege
  302. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, 6th edition: Jamie Rankin & Larry Wells
  303. Essentials of Marketing: A Marketing Strategy Planning Approach, 14th edition: William D. Perreault & Jr. & Joseph P. Cannon & E. Jerome McCarthy
  304. Financial & Managerial Accounting, 17th Edition: Jan R. Williams
  305. Statistics, Data Analysis, and Decision Modeling (5th Edition): James R. Evans
  306. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, 8th edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  307. Big Ideas of Early Mathematics: What Teachers of Young Children Need to Know: The Early Math Collaborative- E
  308. Bailey's Research for the Health Professional, 3rd edition: Diana Bailey & Angela Hissong
  309. Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, 7th edition: John W. Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson & Stephen D. Burd
  310. Survey of Operating Systems, 5th edition: Jane Holcombe
  311. Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents, 7th edition: Jane Case-Smith & Jane Clifford O'Brien
  312. McGraw Hill Taxation of Business Entities, 2018 Edition: SPILKER & AYERS & BARRICK & OUTSLAY & ROBINSON & WEAVER & WORSHAM
  313. Accounting Controls Guidebook: Third Edition: A Practical Guide: Steven Bragg
  314. The African-American Odyssey: Volume 2 (6th Edition): Darlene Clark Hine
  315. Exploring Psychology in Modules, 10th edition: David Myers & Nathan Dewall
  316. The Human Body in Health and Illness, 5th edition: Barbara Herlihy
  317. CPHQ Exam Secrets Study Guide: CPHQ Test Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  318. CPHQ Exam Practice Questions (First Set): CPHQ Practice Tests & Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  319. Philosophy: A Text with Readings, 13th edition: Manuel Velasquez
  320. Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics: Using Microsoft Excel 2016, 4th Edition: Neil J. Salkind
  321. Tort Law: Text and Materials, 5th edition: Mark Lunney & Ken Oliphant
  322. Graphic Design School: The Principles and Practice of Graphic Design, 5th edition: David Dabner & Sandra Stewart & Eric Zempol
  323. Microbe, 2nd edition: Michele Swanson, Gemma Reguera, Moselio Schaechter & Frederick Neidhardt
  324. An Introduction to Modern Welfare Economics: Per-Olov Johansson
  325. Human Sexuality, 4th Edition: Roger R. Hock
  326. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, 6th Edition: Lisa J. McIntyre
  327. THINK Psychology, Second Canadian Edition: Abigail A. Baird & Anjanie McCarthy
  328. General Medical Conditions in the Athlete, 2nd edition: Micki Cuppett & Katie Walsh
  329. Laboratory Techniques in Organic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Jerry R. Mohrig & David Alberg & Gretchen Hofmeister & Christine Hammond
  330. C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures, 8th edition: D. S. Malik
  331. Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere, 7th edition: C. Donald Ahrens
  332. St. Martin's Guide to Writing Short Edition with 2016 MLA Update, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper
  333. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th edition: Elaine N. Marieb, Suzanne M. Keller
  334. Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 7th Edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  335. Manual of Structural Kinesiology, 19th Edition: R.T. Floyd
  336. California: The Politics of Diversity, 8th edition: David G. Lawrence
  337. American Government and Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Lynne E. Ford
  338. Business Essentials (11th Edition): Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin
  339. Music: An Appreciation, Brief Edition (B&B Music), 9th Edition: Roger Kamien
  340. Graphic Design Solutions, 5th edition: Robin Landa
  341. Classics of Western Philosophy (Eighth Edition): Steven M. Cahn
  342. International Business, 1st Edition: J. Michael Geringer, Jeanne M. McNett, Michael S. Minor, Donald A. Ball
  343. Texas Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Mark Jones
  344. The Film Experience: An Introduction, 4th Edition: Timothy Corrigan & Patricia White
  345. Adobe® Dreamweaver® Creative Cloud™: Comprehensive: Corinne L. Hoisington & Jessica L. Minnick
  346. Web Design: Introductory (Shelly Cashman), 6th Edition: Jennifer T. Campbell
submitted by bookseller10 to Textbook_releases [link] [comments]


2020.01.05 03:46 TheHiveMindSpeaketh [OC][Long] Chiefs Offseason Roundup, part 1/6: Evaluating Brett Veach's Draft Performance

Welcome to my offseason roundup, where I will be taking a look at the past, present and future of the Chiefs from the armchair GM's perspective. Obviously the Chiefs aren't quite at the offseason yet, and hopefully won't be for a little while, but while we've got a week off I felt it was a good time to kick things off by looking back at our last two drafts under Brett Veach.
Part 1 - Past: Evaluating Brett Veach's Draft Performance (<--- you are here)
Part 2 - Past: Evaluating Brett Veach's FA and Trade Performance (TBD)
Part 3 - Present: Evaluating the Current Roster and Cap Situation (TBD)
Part 4 - Present: Identifying Roster Needs and Offseason Strategy (TBD)
Part 5 - Future: Looking at Potential Draft Targets (TBD)
Part 6 - Future: Looking at Potential FA/Trade Targets (TBD)
As a reminder, Veach stepped up to the GM position in the summer of 2017, but after the 2017 draft. Several articles have come out over the past year or so giving Veach significant credit for drafting Patrick Mahomes in the 2017 draft - you may decide for yourself how much that affects your perception of his drafting skills. For this piece, I'm restricting myself to the two drafts where Veach had full control of the war room. I'll also give a massive caveat to everything that follows: the only true grade for these draft classes is incomplete. It is impossible to fully evaluate a draft class only one or two years out - four or five years is best for a totally fair appraisal. The evaluations below are primarily backward- rather than forward-looking, and could change significantly as the players in question continue to develop. Pretty much all referenced statistics can be found at pro-football-reference.com.

2018 Draft

Going into the draft, the Chiefs had the following picks:
Round Pick From
2 54 -
3 78 Redskins (Alex Smith trade)
3 86 -
4 122 -
4 124 Rams (Marcus Peters trade)
6 196 -
7 233 Cardinals (Marcus Cooper trade)
7 243 Titans (David King trade)
Note that the 1st round pick had been traded for Patrick Mahomes, the 5th round pick had been traded for Cam Erving, and the 7th round pick had been traded for Kenneth Acker. These trades were made pre-Veach.
The Chiefs made the following trades on draft day: With the Bengals, sent picks 2/54 and 3/78, received picks 2/46 and 3/100 With the Ravens, sent picks 3/86 and 4/122, received pick 3/75 With the Patriots, sent picks 7/233 and 7/243, received pick 6/198
After all the trades and selections, this was the result:
Round Pick From Player
2 46 Bengals (draft day) Breeland Speaks (OLB)
3 75 Ravens (draft day) Derrick Nnadi (DT) f
3 100 Bengals (draft day) Dorian O'Daniel (MLB)
4 124 Rams (Peters trade) Armani Watts (S)
6 196 - Tremon Smith (CB)
6 198 Patriots (draft day) Khalil McKenzie (OL)
To keep myself honest, I'll post what I wrote in last offseason's draft strategy writeup:
The results: Nnadi has become a solid NT as the season progressed and projects as next year's starter. Tremon Smith was one of the league's better kick returners. Speaks and O'Daniel played rotational minutes as backups, both still need to improve. Watts didn't get to show much because of injury. McKenzie didn't see any game time this year.
Having gotten a solid starter in the 3rd round, a good special teams contributor in the 6th, and rotational contributors in the 2nd and 3rd, I would say that currently this draft is a solid B-/C+. If any of Speaks/O'Daniel/Watts end up contributing more significantly next season, it would quickly bump up to a B+. If 2 of them do, to me this draft becomes an A. However, if Speaks and Watts bust and O'Daniel stays as what he appears to be (a nickel LB that doesn't project as a starter), it could drop down to a C-. You don't expect much from McKenzie as a late-round flyer who was switching positions coming into the NFL, but if he unexpectedly turns into something that would help too.
Unfortunately, most of this year's developments have been negative for the 2018 draft class. Let's look at each player in detail:
Breeland Speaks, EDGE: Speaks' season started off poorly with his admission that he came into camp slightly out of shape. I felt he had a few positive flashes during preseason action, but he torn his MCL and had season-ending surgery before the regular season began. This means a true INC in terms of evaluation, but it's also 2 seasons of 4 on his rookie deal where he's failed to make a significant impact. One reason to hope for the future is Tanoh Kpassagnon's improvement under Spags and with the shift to the 4-3. Speaks is a similar sort of player who seems to fit better as a 4-3 DE, and projects to be in a 4-man rotation with Clark/OkafoKpassagnon next year. Grade: INC
Derrick Nnadi, DT: The Chiefs' DT rotation saw a lot of turmoil this year. Chris Jones and Xavier Williams suffered injuries, rookie Khalen Saunders had to be rushed into action quickly, and veterans Terrell McClain and Mike Pennel were brought in midseason as reinforcements. Through a completely new defensive scheme and all this turnover, Derrick Nnadi was a true rock at the heart of the defense all season. He was a fulltime starter, playing 54% of defensive snaps, and recorded his first career sack, forced fumble, and interception this season. But his primary job is still as a run-stuffer, and he continued to perform well in that role this year, playing a big part in the defense's overall improvement against the run. PFF grades him very well as a run stopper and the film shows why (also see this Athletic article). Nnadi isn't an outstanding pass rusher but he doesn't have to be - as long as he can occupy space and provide a decent push in the middle, Jones and Clark can go to work elsewhere, and that's what we saw all season. In Nnadi, Veach has found a guy who's started since the back half of his first year, and on a rookie deal too. Starter-quality production on cost-controlled contracts is the formula for winning in today's NFL and that makes this pick a home run, especially from the third round. The only thing preventing this from being an A+ is the fact that your run-stuffing DTs aren't among the most impactful players on a modern defense. Grade: A
Dorian O'Daniel, LB: O'Daniel was a player that fans had a lot of hope for this year. He had what was frankly a perfect opportunity to lock down a starting spot. After the shift to the 4-3 and moving on from both Dee Ford and Justin Houston, the Chiefs had only Anthony Hitchens, DOD and Ben Niemann as LBs with any experience, and DOD was the only outside linebacker in that group. What's more, his range and athletic ability projected perfectly for coverage and hybrid LB/S duties in the new defense. The Chiefs brought in two cheap veterans in Damien Wilson and Darron Lee but no draft picks and O'Daniel had every shot to be a major contributor. Unfortunately this did not pan out at all. Wilson played well as the primary partner with Hitchens in what is effectively a base 4-2 defense, and both Niemann (36% of defensive snaps) and Sorensen (50%) saw significant snaps as lighter defenders on passing downs. O'Daniel was frozen out of the defensive rotation entirely, seeing only 5 defensive snaps all year, all in the season's final game. This season's results don't even really give the fans anything exciting to hype themselves up over. Frankly, if DOD couldn't crack this LB rotation, I don't see much reason to have a lot of hope for the future. It should be pointed out that DOD has been a key special teams contributor on the year. He's a member of all the packages other than the FG unit, recording more ST snaps than any other Chief, and was shouted out a few times by Dave Toub in interviews. Special teams are important and this is a meaningful role, but a third round pick should be expected to do more than just special teams work by the end of their second season. Grade: D/D-
Armani Watts, S: Armani Watts was another player that had some fans excited. He saw some rotational safety minutes in 2018 before a core muscle injury ended his season. Like DOD, his position group has a lot of openings in the offseason after Eric Berry was cut. Unlike DOD, Watts' position group was decisively addressed by Veach with the high-profile signing of Tyrann Mathieu and drafting of Juan Thornhill. These moves arguably turned the safety group from the defense's biggest weakness to their biggest strength, and the result was not much playing time for Watts in 2019. Despite not forcing his way into the lineup this year, I believe Watts deserves less criticism than DOD. Safety is one of the positions groups that typically sees the least rotation, and most teams' top 2 safeties play nearly every snap. Mathieu and Thornhill have been one of the best starting tandems in the league all season and not cracking that group is nothing embarrassing for Watts. He's also a smaller guy, more of a deep free safety and not shown too much in run support, meaning it's not surprising that Sorensen has been the choice as the third safety in that LB/S hybrid role. Like DOD, Watts has been a critical contributor on special teams this year, mentioned by Toub as the top ST performer along with WR Byron Pringle. He's also keeping himself relevant through versatility - this piece indicates he's preparing to step in at 4 different positions across the Chiefs' defensive backfield in case of injury. He'll get a chance to show the results of that work in this playoff run, where he appears to be the top choice to replace Juan Thornhill. Watts may well play every snap this playoffs, so here's hoping he's ready. It's slightly harder to grade backups at positions that don't see much rotation outside of injury, and S is one of those along with spots like QB and OL. But Watts has been a great special teams performer and has looked good to go in limited defensive appearances. This evaluation may change after Watts gets his chance this postseason, but if he can continue to be a flexible backup and special teams star, that's a decent result for a late fourth round pick. Grade: B-/C+
Tremon Smith, CB/KPR: Tremon Smith was an all-pro return man for the Chiefs last year, and a bottom-of-the-roster CB. Even if he wasn't ever going to make a big impact on defense, his special teams contribution was well worth a 6th round pick. I don't believe the Chiefs were actively trying to replace Smith this offseason, but the Tyreek Hill scare probably contributed to the drafting of Mecole Hardman, and Hardman's return skills made keeping a dedicated return man a poor use of a roster spot. He was cut a few weeks into the season. For 6th and 7th round picks, I generally consider making the roster a success and anything else a bonus. Smith didn't stay on the roster but I really don't think that was due to anything he did wrong as much as weird external circumstances, so I'm willing to give Veach credit for a successful late-round pick whenever a guy makes an All-Pro team. I will concede that others may grade this one very differently. Grade: A-/A
Khalil McKenzie, OL: McKenzie never played a snap for the Chiefs and was cut this offseason. He's on the Seahawks practice squad now and has still not registered an NFL appearance. That's a failure even for a late round pick but a reminder that 6th and 7th round picks are basically lottery tickets and a poor evaluation should not weigh heavily into the overall draft grade. However, the fact that Veach gave up 2 7th rounders to go get McKenzie makes it worse. Trading 2 lottery picks for 1 means somebody saw something in McKenzie that just wasn't there. Grade: F
Overall 2018 Draft Grade: Nnadi is the clear star of what is overall a rocky draft so far. I'll again remind everyone that any grade is subject to a lot of changes over future years, especially when the highest draft pick in the class hasn't had much opportunity to show his stuff. But given that nobody from the class is making a huge impact for today's Chiefs (just because Nnadi plays one of the least valuable positions on a modern NFL roster, which is not his fault), it's hard to be that positive on the class at this point. I'll give Veach a solid C- with room to move in either direction based primarily on the future performance of Speaks and Watts.

2019 Draft

Going into the draft, the Chiefs had the following picks:
Round Pick From
2 61 -
2 63 Rams (Marcus Peters trade)
3 84 Seahawks (Frank Clark trade)
5 167 -
6 201 -
6 214 Compensatory
7 216 49ers (Rod Streator trade)
Note that the 1st round pick was traded for Frank Clark, the 3rd round pick (originally pick 92) moved up to 84 in the Frank Clark trade, the 4th round pick was traded for Reggie Ragland, and the 7th round pick (originally pick 243) moved up to 216 in the Rod Streator trade. The trades made by Veach will be discussed in the next post of this roundup, particularly the Frank Clark move.
The Chiefs made the following trades on draft day: With the Rams, sent picks 2/61 and 5/167, received pick 2/56
After all the trades and selections, this was the result:
Round Pick From Player
2 56 Rams (draft day) Mecole Hardman (WKPR)
2 63 Rams (Marcus Peters trade) Juan Thornhill (S)
3 84 Seahawks (Frank Clark trade) Khalen Saunders (DT)
6 201 - Rashad Fenton (CB)
6 214 Compensatory Darwin Thompson (RB)
7 216 49ers (Rod Streator trade) Nick Allegretti (OL)
Hand up time - I didn't like this draft on the day. Here's what I said after Day 2:
I hope I'm wrong but I really don't like this draft.
We trade up for a guy I would consider a round 3-4 talent. Ok a couple of teams go WR after but Andy Isabella was there at #61. Not to mention Hakeem Butler, Kelvin Harmon, Terry McLaurin, Miles Boykin all floating around. We loved Hardman that much more than everybody else? Plus we go WR with a ridiculous amount of DB talent available. WR is clearly a need but prioritizing it over CB feels reactionary to this Hill stuff. WR is more replaceable than CB by a long shot.
Then we go Thornhill at #63, personally I prefer CGJ but I liked Thornhill too so okay, fine.
Then we get to #84 and there's still serious CB talent available. I think Oruwariye is a borderline round 1 talent, you've got Julian Love, Isaiah Johnson, Jamel Dean. And we go DT? I like Khalen Saunders, value-wise the pick is solid. But you hit on your 1T last year with Nnadi and you've got a solid backup in Xavier Williams. You're reinforcing a strength on the DL instead of finding anybody to fill in a paper-thin CB room (FulleBreeland on 1yr deals, Ward who for all his promise is a UDFA with 3 games on him, Smith a KR and Reaser an AAF pickup).
If the Patrick Peterson rumors are real and we have a reasonable deal for him, maybe I could see it. I still don't love Hardman but of course my evaluations are gonna differ with the guys paid to do this. And if you have a plan to address CB (the most critical need entering the draft), then picking up solid players at WS/DT is understandable. But right now this leaves me scared. Do any of these guys project to be more than rotational this season? Hardman WR3/PR, Thornhill S3, Saunders DT3 or even 4?
Things have worked out much better than I hoped. Let's go into detail:
Mecole Hardman, WKPR: Hardman has made a big impact almost every time he touched the ball this year, finishing tops in the league in yards per catch and target along with an all-pro selection as a returner. He had huge highlights in both roles, showcasing his incredible speed on plays like these. There really wasn't much of anything to criticize him for after a few questionable decisions in the return game at the beginning of the year. Seemingly the only thing that held Hardman back this year was the coaching staff's willingness to put him on the field. Even with Tyreek Hill missing significant time, Hardman competed for Byron Pringle to be the fourth WR for much of the year and has never seen starter-level snaps on offense. Andy Reid's offense is famously difficult to pick up and almost all of his rookie receivers effectively take a redshirt year, so maybe we should commend Hardman for contributing so well despite that. But with Watkins and Robinson likely to leave this offseason, Hardman should see an expanded role next year no matter what. The question in grading Veach's selection of Hardman is not whether he found a good player (he did) or a good contributor (538yd/6TD + great return play is a very good contribution from a 2nd round rookie) but whether he got the best value possible. Veach gave up a 5th round pick to get a WR on a board that still had DK Metcalf (900yd/7TD + arguably a better complement to Tyreek) and Terry McLaurin (919yd/7TD), both of whom were generally higher rated coming into the draft. He also passed up on other positions of big need, particularly CB, where players like David Long and Jamel Dean were available (both selected in the 3rd and contributed very well this year). The fact that Hardman didn't get as many snaps as he could have is in part because the Chiefs WR group was solid this season and was not one of the team's critical needs. On the other hand, with Watkins and Robinson likely to leave next year, it's possible Veach was simply looking ahead to a future need. I may be nitpicking this selection too much because of my initially negative reaction, but I feel the grade on this one should be adjusted down slightly based on the opportunity cost of taking what is arguably a bit of a "luxury" player for this roster. Grade: B+/B
Juan Thornhill, S: Thornhill has simply been outstanding for the Chiefs this year. He had a few fits and starts at the beginning of the year but improved quickly to be a great free safety and a member of arguably the league's best safety pairing. There's not much to say here simply because there's nothing to argue about. Thornhill has been an outstanding fit at arguably the Chiefs' biggest position of need, and one of the key positions on a modern defense at that. Thornhill's late-season injury is a huge blow to our playoff ambitions but that's nothing to criticize Veach for. When you get a guy who starts at a high level basically from day one anywhere in the draft you're ecstatic, when you get him in the back of the 2nd round it's something a GM puts on the top of his resume. Grade: A+
Khalen Saunders, DT: Saunders started off the year with a few weeks as a healthy scratch and it looked like this could be a redshirt year for the athletic small-school prospect. But injuries to Chris Jones and Xavier Williams forced him into the rotation and Saunders ended up playing a healthy 27% of the defensive snaps in his rookie season. Saunders didn't show anything elite, but he did pick up his first sack and play at a pretty average level overall without ever looking like a liability. For a rookie who was always going to need some development after playing his college ball at Western Illinois in the FCS, it was a decent showing in his first year. Just like Hardman, the question here is less about talent (seems good) than overall value. DT was arguably the Chiefs' strongest defensive position group going into the offseason, and the Chiefs saw players like Jamel Dean (CB), Bobby Okereke (LB) and Dawson Knox (TE) selected shortly after Saunders at positions of much bigger need. But also like Hardman, Saunders should have a larger opportunity to contribute in 2020, with both Chris Jones and Xavier Williams reaching the ends of their contracts. There's still a lot to come for Khalen Saunders' career, and with his potential the sky is the limit. Grade: C+/B-
Darwin Thompson, RB: Thompson kicked off his preseason with some great work that had excitement levels through the roof among the Chiefs fanbase. But like WRs, RBs tend to be held back as rookies under Andy Reid, and it's ultimately unsurprising that he had a limited role this season. What we did see from Thompson was very encouraging. He showed some good hands, great balance, and a hard-nosed running style that has endeared him to the fanbase. If he can work on his vision and pass protection, he has the potential to grow into a very good running back. Looking forward, if Thompson can continue to build on his work this year, I would expect that the Chiefs would not feel the need to bring in a veteran FA running back as they did with McCoy this year, and instead run with Williams/Williams/Thompson/some rookie. As a 6th-round pick Thompson is a success for me by virtue of being near-certain to hold on to his roster spot, and his special teams contributions and promise as an offensive weapon make this a good selection from Veach. Grade: B+/B
Rashad Fenton, CB: Fenton is perhaps the least-discussed and most-surprising addition to the bottom of the Chiefs' roster this offseason. With CB one of the biggest positions of need, it was surprising and disappointing to see the Chiefs pass up any member of 2019's deep Day 2 draft class. The late-round addition of Fenton was not enough to mollify many Chiefs fans, including myself - but the rookie surpassed all expectations this year. Fenton took over significant slot CB minutes while Kendall Fuller was injured and played quite well, making several big plays including an interception against the Chargers, a forced fumble on special teams against the Raiders, and several big pass breakups. He also popped off the broadcast with some great swag on his celebrations. For more, see the Athletic's review on Fenton. Fenton did enough to justify his 6th-round selection by contributing on special teams, and then went farther by playing well beyond expectations when called upon at CB. Fenton still has athletic limitations that will likely prevent him from ever being a top corner. But his play was a welcome surprise this year, and if he can continue to be solid in the slot, it will be a big help for the Chiefs - especially going into an offseason where Fenton and Charvarius Ward are the only CBs with any NFL experience contracted to Kansas City. This was undoubtedly a win for Veach. Grade: A
Nick Allegretti, C/G: Allegretti was another forgotten man at the bottom of the Chiefs draft who was a healthy scratch for most of the year. He did keep his roster spot and even made a few brief appearances on the offensive line when injuries required it. If he can continue to hold onto his roster spot into next year he may get more opportunities as the Chiefs' interior OL has struggled. The roster spot is enough for me to consider a 7th-rounder an acceptable pick so far but we really haven't seen enough to know yet. Grade: C+
Overall 2019 Draft Grade: No question here - Veach hit a home run in the 2019 draft. The only question is whether it's barely over the fence or if he's knocked it out of the park entirely. If Hardman, Saunders and Thompson can reach their full potential this could be a real draft to remember for the Chiefs franchise despite the lack of a first-round pick, and it's hard to imagine the floor on this one getting much worse than just "really good". The 2019 draft single-handedly ensures that Veach will keep his job as GM for another year no matter what even the most strident hater thinks. It's an easy A for the 2019 draft, with hopes for an A+ as the years go on.

Miscellaneous Draft Takeaways

There are a few other things we can take away from Veach's drafts as far as tendencies go. Veach has traded up 4 times and not traded back once. He's traded up 3 times on Day 2 and once on Day 3. That suggests a GM who has his guys and is confident in his scouting evaluations. He hasn't had a first round pick yet, so we'll see how the Chiefs attack this year's selection there. Veach has also shown an interesting trend of targeting position groups a year before they become critical roster needs. Look at Breeland Speaks (Ford and Houston left the next year), Hardman (Watkins and Robinson likely departures) and Saunders (Jones and Williams could go). This is an interesting way of keeping your rookies relevant while also giving them a year to acclimate to the NFL without having to be major contributors. Meanwhile, immediate needs were filled with short-term FA deals in 2019 for veterans like Breeland at CB, Wilson/Lee at LB, or McCoy at RB. And in the 2018 offseason consider the signings of Xavier Williams, Ron Parker and Orlando Scandrick. Keep this in mind when projecting our moves this offseason: Veach might look to patch immediate needs like CB and LG with free agent signings, while drafting at positions that have key contributors on expiring contracts, like RB (Damien Williams' contract expiring in 2020), DT (if Chris Jones is tagged), or C (Austin Reiter's contract expiring in 2020).
Thoughts? Agree or disagree on any of my player evaluations? Chime in in the comments, and let me know if there's anything in particular I should change or look into while writing the rest of this series.
submitted by TheHiveMindSpeaketh to KansasCityChiefs [link] [comments]


2020.01.03 17:27 bookseller10 Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-4)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes, and Systems, 6th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  2. Precalculus Essentials: J. S. Ratti & Marcus S. McWaters
  3. Genetics- A Conceptual Approach, 6th edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  4. The Global Casino, Fifth Edition: An Introduction to Environmental Issues: Nick Middleton
  5. Macroeconomics, 2nd Canadian Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells & Iris Au
  6. Biology: A Global Approach, 10th edition: Neil A. Campbell & Jane B. Reece & Lisa Urry & Michael L Cain & Steven A Wasserman & Author
  7. Information Technology Project Management, 5th Edition: Jack T. Marchewka
  8. Clinical Laboratory Hematology, 3rd Global Edition: Shirlyn B. Kenzie & Lynne Williams
  9. Exploring Medical Language, 10th edition: Myrna LaFleur Brooks & Danielle LaFleur Brooks
  10. Business Essentials, Eighth Canadian Edition: Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin & Frederick A. Starke & George Dracopoulos
  11. Chemistry Atoms First, 3rd edition: Julia Burdge & Jason Overby
  12. Sensation and Perception, 2nd edition: Steven Yantis & Richard Abrams
  13. Abnormal Psychology, 8th Global Edition: Thomas F. Oltmanns & Robert E. Emery
  14. Documentation Manual for Occupational Therapy, 4th edition : Crystal A. Gateley & Sherry Borcherding
  15. Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement, 13th edition: Michelle A. Green
  16. Java For Everyone: Compatible with Java 5, 6, and 7, 2nd Edition: Cay S. Horstmann
  17. Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application, 9th edition: Bessie L. Marquis & Carol J. Huston
  18. Economics: The User's Guide: Ha-Joon Chang
  19. Gendered Lives, 12th edition: Julia T. Wood & Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz
  20. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  21. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  22. Calculus - Early Transcendentals, 8th edition: James Stewart
  23. Willard and Spackman's Occupational Therapy, 12th edition: Barbara A. Schell & Marjorie Scaffa & Glen Gillen & Ellen S. Cohn
  24. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th edition: M. Morris Mano
  25. Principles of Risk Management and Insurance, 13th Global Edition: George E. Rejda & Michael McNamara
  26. Community & Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Public's Health, 9th edition: Cherie Rector
  27. Environmental Science for AP®, Second Edition: Andrew Friedland & Rick Relyea
  28. College Algebra, 4th Edition: Cynthia Y. Young
  29. Sustainable Urban Development Reader (Routledge Urban Reader Series), 3rd Edition: Wheeler and Beatly
  30. Psychiatric Nursing: Assessment, Care Plans, and Medications, 9th edition: Townsend, Mary
  31. Managing Business Process Flows (3rd Edition): Ravi Anupindi
  32. Precalculus, 10th edition: Michael Sullivan
  33. Psychology in Your Life (Second Edition): Sarah Grison & Todd Heatherton & Michael Gazzaniga
  34. Introductory Algebra, 12th edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  35. American History: Connecting with the Past-Vol 2: Alan Brinkley
  36. Cities of the World: Regional Patterns and Urban Environments, 6th edition: Brunn, Stanley D.; Hays-Mitchell, Maureen; Zeigler, Donald J.
  37. Strategies for Successful Writing, 11th edition: James A. Reinking & Robert A. von der Osten
  38. College Algebra with Modeling & Visualization, 6th edition: Gary K. Rockswold
  39. Understanding Psychology (11th Edition): Tony Morris
  40. Understanding ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS: A Worktext, 3rd edition: Mary Jo Bowie
  41. Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief 6th edition: Carol Berkin & Christopher Miller & Robert Cherny & James Gormly & Douglas Egerton
  42. Crossroads and Cultures, Volume II: Since 1300: A History of the World's Peoples: Bonnie G. Smith & Marc Van De Mieroop & Richard von Glahn & Kris Lane
  43. Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 4th edition: Joan L. Slonczewski & John W. Foster
  44. Web Design: Introductory (HTML), 4th edition: Gary B. Shelly & Jennifer T. Campbell
  45. Problems from Philosophy, 3rd Edition: James Rachels & Stuart Rachels
  46. Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America (Fourth Edition): John Charles Chasteen
  47. Data Structures and Algorithms Using Java: William McAllister
  48. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, 6th edition: Edward Allen & Joseph Iano
  49. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 7th edition: Douglas A. Skoog & F. James Holler & Stanley R. Crouch
  50. Hands-On Microsoft Windows Server 2016, 2nd Edition: Michael Palmer
  51. A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists, 6th edition: Fred Beisse
  52. The World A History, Volume One (3rd Edition): Felipe Fernández-Armesto
  53. Discovering the Life Span, 4th edition: Robert S. Feldman
  54. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  55. Ethics for the Information Age, 7th Edition: Michael J. Quinn
  56. Human Communication in Society, 4th edition: Jess K. Alberts & Thomas K. Nakayama & Judith N. Martin
  57. Traditions and Encounters Vol 1 (History), 6th edition: Jerry Bentley
  58. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  59. Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions, 6th edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  60. Diversity Consciousness: Opening Our Minds to People, Cultures, and Opportunities, 4th edition: Richard D. Bucher
  61. MCSA Guide to Administering Microsoft Windows Server 2012/R2, Exam 70-411: Greg Tomsho
  62. Your Office: Microsoft Excel 2016 Comprehensive (Your Office for Office 2016 Series): Amy S. Kinser & Kristyn Jacobson & Eric Kinser & Brant Paige Moriarity
  63. Principles of Macroeconomics (Second Edition): Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  64. Veterinary Surgery: Small Animal Expert Consult: 2-Volume Set, 2nd edition: Spencer A. Johnston
  65. College Algebra, 7th edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  66. Certified Paralegal Review Manual: A Practical Guide to CP Exam Preparation, 4th edition: Virginia Koerselman Newman
  67. American Government: Power and Purpose (Fourteenth Core Edition): Stephen Ansolabehere & Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Kenneth A. Shepsle
  68. Numerical Analysis, 10th edition: Richard L. Burden & J. Douglas Faires & Annette M. Burden
  69. The Mechanical Design Process, 5th edition: David G. Ullman
  70. Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development, 6th edition: Rowntree,Lewis, Price & Wyckoff
  71. The Old Testament Story (9th Edition): John Tullock
  72. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams
  73. Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints, 6th edition: Robert H. Seller & Andrew B. Symons
  74. The Litigation Paralegal: A Systems Approach, 6th edition: James W. H. McCord & Pamela Tepper
  75. Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law (Aspen Casebook), 4th edition: Lisa G. Lerman & Philip G. Schrag
  76. Principles of Auditing & Other Assurance Services, 20th edition: O. Ray Whittington, Kurt Pany
  77. Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th edition: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating: Rhea Paul & Courtenay Norbury
  78. Organisational Behaviour Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Australasian Edition: Wood, Jack; Zeffane, Rachid M.; Fromholtz, Michele
  79. Essentials of Corporate Finance, 9th Edition: Stephen A. Ross, Randolph W. Westerfield, Bradford D. Jordan
  80. Development of Children, 7th edition: Cynthia Lightfoot
  81. Asian Art: Marika Sardar & Dorinda Neave & Lara C. W. Blanchard
  82. Macroeconomics (6th Edition): R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony P. O'Brien
  83. Electron Flow in Organic Chemistry: A Decision-Based Guide to Organic Mechanisms (2nd Edition): Scudder, Paul H.(Author)
  84. Biochemistry, 1st edition: Roger L. Miesfeld & Megan M. McEvoy
  85. Stress Management for Life: A Research-Based Experiential Approach, 4th edition: Michael Olpin & Margie Hesson
  86. Engineering Fundamentals: An Introduction to Engineering, 5th edition: Saeed Moaveni
  87. Articulation and Phonological Disorders: Speech Sound Disorders in Children (8th Edition): John E. Bernthal & Nicholas W. Bankson & Peter Flipsen Jr.
  88. Communication in a Civil Society: Shelley D. Lane & Ruth Anne Abigail & John Gooch
  89. The Immune System, 4th Edition: Peter Parham
  90. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 4th edition: Anthony J. Hayter
  91. Social Psychology: The Science of Everyday Life: Jeff Greenberg & Toni Schmader & Jamie Arndt & Mark Landau
  92. Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition: Talaro
  93. Business Analysis and Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 5th edition: Krishna Palepu & Paul Healy
  94. Introductory Chemistry, 8th Edition: Steven S. Zumdahl & Donald J. Decoste
  95. Single Variable Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition: James Stewart
  96. Foundations of Education, Third Edition: Volume I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments: Various
  97. Campbell Essential Biology with Physiology, 5th Global Edition: Eric J. Simon & Jean L. Dickey & Jane B. Reece & Kelly A. Hogan
  98. Mastering the World of Psychology, 5th edition: Ellen Green Wood & Samuel E. Wood & Denise Boyd
  99. Business Data Networks and Security (10th Edition): Raymond R. Panko & Julia L. Panko
  100. America's History, Volume I: To 1877, 8th edition: James A. Henretta & Eric Hinderaker & Rebecca Edwards & Robert O. Self
  101. Investigating Social Problems: A. Javier Trevino
  102. Tropical Ecosystems and Ecological Concepts, 2nd edition: Patrick Osborne
  103. Read, Reason, Write, 11 Edition: Dorothy Seyler
  104. MGMT (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press) 10th Edition: Chuck Williams
  105. MLA Handbook, 8th edition: The Modern Language Association of America
  106. The Game Design Reader: A Rules of Play Anthology (MIT Press): Katie Salen Tekinba & Eric Zimmerman
  107. American Politics Today, 5th Core edition: William T. Bianco & David T. Canon
  108. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 3rd edition: Clark Spencer Larsen
  109. Awakening: An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought, 5th Edition: Patrick S. Bresnan
  110. Discovering Computers ©2016 (Shelly Cashman Series): Misty E. Vermaat & Susan L. Sebok & Steven M. Freund & Jennifer T. Campbell & Mark Frydenberg
  111. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance (4th Edition): Jonathan Berk & Peter Demarzo & Jarrad Harford
  112. Human Anatomy & Physiology, 9th/10th edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Katja N. Hoehn
  113. Structural Analysis (9th Edition): Russell C. Hibbeler
  114. Hydrology and Hydraulic Systems, 4th edition: Ram Gupta
  115. Between One and Many: The Art and Science of Public Speaking, 7th edition: Steven R. Brydon & Michael D Scott
  116. Logic: The Essentials: Patrick J. Hurley
  117. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Volume I, 14th edition: Fred S Kleiner
  118. Paralegal Professional: The Essentials, 5th edition: Thomas F. Goldman & Henry R. Cheeseman
  119. Chemistry: Structure and Properties, 2nd edition: Nivaldo J. Tro
  120. Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport (B&B Physical Education),10th Edition: Angela Lumpkin
  121. Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  122. American Government, 2014 Elections and Updates Edition: Karen J. O'Connor & Larry J. Sabato & Alixandra B. Yanus
  123. Nutrition: Science and Applications, 4th Edition: Lori A. Smolin & Mary B. Grosvenor
  124. Experiential Approach to Organization Development, 8th edition: Brown, Donald R
  125. How to Work a Room, 25th Anniversary Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Making Lasting Connections--In Person and Online: Susan RoAne
  126. The Creative Spirit: An Introduction to Theatre, 6th edition: Stephanie Arnold
  127. The Philosopher's Way, 5th edition: John Chaffee
  128. Problem Solving with C++, 9th edition: Walter Savitch
  129. Skills for Success with Office 2016 Volume 1 (Skills for Success for Office 2016 Series): Margo Chaney Adkins & Lisa Hawkins & Catherine Hain & Stephanie Murre-Wolf
  130. The Physics of Everyday Phenomena, Eighth Edition: W. Thomas Griffith & Juliet W. Brosing
  131. Precalculus, 6th edition: Margaret L. Lial & John Hornsby & David I. Schneider & Callie J. Daniels
  132. Starting Out with Programming Logic & Design, Fourth Edition: Tony Gaddis
  133. MKTG11, 11th Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair & Carl McDaniel
  134. The Business Writer's Companion, 8th edition: Gerald J. Alred & Charles T. Brusaw & Walter E. Oliu
  135. America: A Concise History, Volume 2, 6th edition: James Henretta
  136. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: David C. Colander
  137. Psychology, 11th edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  138. American Education: A History, 5th edition: Jennings L. Wagoner Jr. & Wayne J. Urban
  139. Give Me Liberty! An American History, Seagull 5th edition-Vol 1: Eric Foner
  140. Anthropology: The Human Challenge, 15th edition: William A. Haviland & Harald E. L. Prins & Dana Walrath & Bunny McBride
  141. Lifespan Development, 7th edition: Denise Boyd & Helen Bee
  142. Essentials of Database Management: Jeffrey A. Hoffer & Heikki Topi & Venkataraman Ramesh
  143. GOVT8 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press), 8th edition: Edward Sidlow & Beth Henschen
  144. Horngren's Accounting: The Managerial Chapters (11th Edition): Tracie L. Miller-Nobles & Brenda L. Mattison & Ella Mae Matsumura
  145. Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Context, 3rd edition: Stephen Orvis & Carol Ann Drogus
  146. Experience Psychology, 3rd Edition: Laura A. King
  147. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd Edition: Dan O’Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  148. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics, 9th edition: Raymond A. Serway & John W. Jewett
  149. The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology, 5th Edition: Kerry Ferris & Jill Stein
  150. Biological Science, 6th edition: Scott Freeman & Kim Quillin & Lizabeth Allison & Michael Black & Emily Taylor & Greg Podgorski & Jeff Carmichael
  151. Communication: Embracing Difference, 4th edition: Daniel M. Dunn & Lisa J. Goodnight
  152. A Sequence for Academic Writing, 7th edition: Laurence Behrens & Leonard Rosen
  153. Guide to Operating Systems, 5th edition: Greg Tomsho
  154. THiNK, 4th Edition: Judith Boss
  155. Principles of Economics, 8th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  156. Shelly Cashman Series Discovering Computers & Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2016: A Fundamental Combined Approach: Jennifer T. Campbell
  157. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature Of Matter And Change, Eighth Edition: Martin S. Silberberg, Patricia G. Amateis
  158. Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services, 5th edition: Jerry V. Diller
  159. Social Psychology, 10th edition: Saul Kassin
  160. Our Sexuality, 13th edition: Robert Crooks & Karla Baur
  161. Professional Nursing Concepts: Competencies for Quality Leadership, 3rd Edition: Finkelman, Anita & Kenner, Carole
  162. Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 3rd Edition: Kyle, Theresa & Ricci, Susan & Carman, Susan
  163. Psychology, 4th edition: Schacter, Daniel L. & Gilbert, Daniel T. & Nock, Matthew K. & Wegner, Daniel M.
  164. 21st Century Astronomy, 5th edition: Laura Kay, Stacy Palen & George Blumenthal
  165. Calculus, 11th edition: Ron Larson
  166. Surface Water-Quality Monitoring: Steven C. Chapra
  167. Pearson's Federal Taxation 2018, Comprehensive: Thomas R. Pope
  168. Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th edition: Thomas L. Wheelen
  169. Bankruptcy Law and Practice: Grace A. Luppino J.D
  170. Family Law for the Paralegal, 3rd edition: Mary E. Wilson
  171. Successful Writing at Work, 10th edition: Philip C. Kolin
  172. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Dan O'Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  173. Intimate Relationships, 7th Edition: Rowland Miller
  174. Software Engineering, 10th edition: Ian Sommerville
  175. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics, Structure, and Change, 10th edition: Peter Atkins & Julio de Paula
  176. Educational Research: Competencies for Analysis and Applications (11th Edition): Geoffrey E. Mills & L. R. Gay
  177. At a Glance: Writing Essays and Beyond, 6th edition: Lee Brandon
  178. Delmar’s Standard Textbook of Electricity, 6th edition: Stephen L. Herman
  179. Psychology, 5th edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli
  180. Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 15th Edition: Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl
  181. The Little Seagull Handbook, 3rd Edition: Richard Bullock, Michal Brody & Francine Weinberg
  182. STAT 2: Building Models for a World of Data: Ann R. Cannon
  183. Interplay-The Process of Interpersonal Communication, 13th edition: Ronald Adler
  184. SELL 5 (New, Engaging Titles From 4LTR Press), 5th edition: Thomas N. Ingram & Raymond (buddy) W. Laforge & Ramon A. Avila & Charles H. Schwepker & Michael R. Williams
  185. Marketing Channels, 8th edition: Bert Rosenbloom
  186. The Changing Earth: Exploring Geology and Evolution, 7th Edition: James S. Monroe & Reed Wicander
  187. Applied Regression Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, 3rd edition: John Fox
  188. Development Economics: Debraj Ray
  189. Organic Chemistry, 9th edition: Leroy G. Wade
  190. A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 9th edition: Jan A. Pechenik
  191. DSP First, 2nd Edition: McClellan, Schafer & Yoder
  192. Epidemiology, 5th Edition: Leon Gordis
  193. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Edition: Dee Unglaub Silverthorn
  194. Essentials of Sociology 12th edition: James M. Henslin
  195. Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th edition: Jacqueline Burchum & Laura Rosenthal
  196. Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives, 6th edition: Michael E. Kraft & Scott R. Furlong
  197. Financial Management: Principles and Applications (12th Edition): Sheridan Titman & Arthur J. Keown
  198. Animal Physiology, 4th Edition: Richard W. Hill
  199. Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy (5th Edition): Robert W. Bauman
  200. Understanding Basic Statistics, 7th edition: Charles Henry Brase & Corrinne Pellillo Brase
  201. Organic Chemistry: Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual, 3rd edition: David Klein
  202. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 11th edition: Howard Anton, Irl Bivens & Stephen Davis
  203. An Introduction to Student–Involved Assessment FOR Learning, 7th edition: Jan Chappuis & Rick Stiggins
  204. The Bedford Researcher with 2016 MLA Update, 5th edition: Mike Palmquist
  205. Roots of the Western Tradition: A Short History of the Ancient World, 8th edition: Guy Rogers & C. Warren Hollister
  206. Contemporary Logistics, 12th edition: Paul R. Murphy & A. Michael Knemeyer
  207. Personal Finance, 13th edition: E. Thomas Garman
  208. C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 8th Edition: D. S. Malik
  209. Information Systems Today: Managing in the Digital World, 7th edition: Joseph Valacich & Christoph Schneider
  210. New Products Management, 11th Edition: Merle Crawford & Anthony Di Benedetto
  211. A World of Ideas, 10th Edition: Lee A. Jacobus
  212. Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control: Terry L.M. Bartelt
  213. We the People: An Introduction to American Politics 11th Essentials edition: Benjamin Ginsberg, et al.
  214. Wardlaw's Contemporary Nutrition, 10th edition: Anne Smith & Angela Collene
  215. Technical Communication, 14th Edition: John M. Lannon
  216. Electronics Fundamentals: A Systems Approach: Thomas L. Floyd & David M. Buchla
  217. Discrete-Event System Simulation, 5th edition: Jerry Banks & John S. Carson & Barry L. Nelson & David M. Nicol
  218. Engaging Social Welfare: An Introduction to Policy Analysis: Mark J. Stern
  219. Social Welfare Policy and Advocacy: Advancing Social Justice through 8 Policy Sectors: Bruce S. Jansson
  220. Foundations of Astronomy, 12th edition: Michael A. Seeds & Dana Backman
  221. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: Volume: 1 (Concise Edition): Elizabeth Pollard & Clifford Rosenberg & Robert Tignor
  222. The Art of Public Speaking, 12th Edition: Stephen E. Lucas
  223. Genetic Essentials: Concepts and Conncections, 3rd edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  224. Prosthodontic Treatment for Edentulous Patients: Complete Dentures and Implant-Supported Prostheses, 13th edition: George A. Zarb & John Hobkirk & Steven Eckert & Rhonda Jacob
  225. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 9th edition: Robert Jurmain & Lynn Kilgore & Wenda Trevathan
  226. The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook with 2016 MLA Update: Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin & Francine Weinberg
  227. Biochemistry: Concepts and Connections: Dean R. Appling & Spencer J. Anthony-Cahill
  228. The Basic Practice of Statistics, 7th edition: David S. Moore & William I. Notz & Michael A. Fligner
  229. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd edition: GEORGE YOUNG and William Hopwood
  230. Macroeconomics, 4th edition: Charles I. Jones
  231. Web Development and Design Foundations with HTML5, 8th edition: Terry Ann Felke-Morris, Ed.D
  232. Invitation to Public Speaking - National Geographic Edition, 5th Edition: Cindy L. Griffin
  233. Marketing: the Core, 6th edition: Roger A. Kerin, Steven W. Hartley
  234. Development: Infancy Through Adolescence: Laurence Steinberg and Deborah Lowe Vandell
  235. Sports Economics: Roger D. Blair
  236. Quick & Easy Medical Terminology, 8th edition: Peggy C. Leonard
  237. Legal Research and Writing for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 8th edition: Deborah E. Bouchoux
  238. Evidence for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 5th edition: Joelyn D. Marlowe
  239. Criminal Law, 12th edition: Joel Samaha
  240. Natural Resource Economics: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Barry C. Field
  241. Learning with LabVIEW, 1st Edition: Robert H. Bishop
  242. Methods in Behavioral Research, 12th edition: Paul C. Cozby & Scott C. Bates
  243. Contemporary Human Behavior Theory: A Critical Perspective for Social Work , 3rd edition: Susan P. Robbins
  244. Managerial Accounting for Managers, 4th edition: Eric Noreen
  245. Basic Marketing Research: Using Microsoft Excel Data Analysis, 3rd Edition: Alvin Burns & Ronald Bush
  246. Dosage Calculations Made Incredibly Easy! (Incredibly Easy! Series®), 5th edition: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  247. Fundamentals of Financial Management, 14th edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Joel F. Houston
  248. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture, 5th edition: Richard J. Payne
  249. FOCUS on Community College Success, 4th edition: Constance Staley
  250. The American Promise, Value Edition, Volume 2, 7th edition: James L. Roark & Michael P. Johnson & Patricia Cline Cohen & Sarah Stage & Susan M. Hartmann
  251. The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, 11th Edition: Frederic S. Mishkin
  252. Management, 14th edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & Joseph J. Martocchio & Lori K. Long
  253. Organizational Behavior, 17th edition: Stephen P. Robbins
  254. Race and Ethnicity: The United States and the World (2nd Edition): Scupin, Raymond, Ph.D
  255. Entrepreneurial Small Business, 5th edition: Jerome A. Katz & Richard P. Green II
  256. Teaching Discipline-Specific Literacies in Grades 6-12: Preparing Students for College, Career, and Workforce Demands: Vicky I. Zygouris-Coe
  257. Human Development A Cultural Approach (2nd Edition): Jeffrey J. Arnett
  258. Listening to Music, 8th edition: Craig Wright
  259. Work in the 21st Century, 5th edition: Frank J. Landy
  260. Principles of Microeconomics, 8th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  261. Strategic Management: Text and Cases (Irwin Management), 8th Edition: Gregory G Dess Dr. and Gerry McNamara
  262. Essentials of Sociology, 2nd edition: George Ritzer
  263. Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, 7th Edition: John Perry & Michael Bratman
  264. Real Estate Development - 5th Edition: Principles and Process: Mike E. Miles & Laurence M. Netherton & Adrienne Schmitz
  265. Real Estate Finance & and Investments, 15th edition: William Brueggeman
  266. A First Course in Differential Equations with Modeling Applications, 11th edition: Dennis G. Zill
  267. The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, 10th edition: James W. Zubrick
  268. Administration of Wills, Trusts and Estates, 5th edition: Gordon Brown & Scott Myers
  269. Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years (Early Childhood Education Series): Judy Harris Helm & Lilian G. Katz
  270. Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 8th Edition: Halliday & Resnick & Walker
  271. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 2nd Edition: Weygandt & Kimmel & Kieso
  272. College Algebra, 6th edition: Mark Dugopolski
  273. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture: Volume Two, Brief 4th Edition : Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  274. Society: The Basics, 14th Edition: John J Macionis
  275. M: Marketing, 5th Edition: Dhruv Grewal, Michael Levy
  276. Mass Media and American Politics, 10th edition: Doris A. Graber & Johanna L. Dunaway
  277. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  278. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 E-Book: 5 Books in 1 (Ferri's Medical Solutions): Fred F. Ferri
  279. Organic Chemistry, 5th Edition: Janice Gorzynski Smith
  280. COMM4 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press): Kathleen S. Verderber, Deanna D. Sellnow & Rudolph F. Verderber
  281. The Theatre Experience, 13th edition: Edwin Wilson
  282. Mcknight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 12th edition: Darrel Hess & Dennis Tasa
  283. Intermediate Algebra, 12th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  284. Strategic Management Concept, 3rd Edition: Frank Rothaermel
  285. Moral Issues in Business, 13th edition: William H. Shaw
  286. Marketing 2016, 18th edition: William M. Pride & O. C. Ferrell
  287. Experiencing the World's Religions: Tradition, Challenge, and Change, 6th Edition: Michael Molloy
  288. Fundamentals of Cost Accounting, 5th edition: William N. Lanen, Shannon W. Anderson, Michael W. Maher
  289. Motivational Interviewing in Health Care: Helping Patients Change Behavior (Applications of Motivational Interviewing): Stephen Rollnick & William R. Miller & Christopher C. Butler
  290. Community and Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 1st edition: Gail A. Harkness & Rosanna DeMarco
  291. Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations, 6th Edition: Mary A. Nies & Melanie McEwen
  292. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart, 4th Edition, Volume One: Robert Tignor
  293. Microeconomics: Theory & Applications, 12th edition: Edgar K. Browning
  294. CCNA Routing and Switching ICND2 200-105 Official Cert Guide, Academic Edition: Wendell Odom
  295. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 11th edition: Ross & Westerfield & Jordan
  296. Daniels and Worthingham's Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination and Performance Testing (Daniels & Worthington's Muscle Testing (Hislop)), 9th Edition: Helen Hislop & Dale Avers & Marybeth Brown
  297. Worlds Together Worlds Apart, 4th Edition , Volume Two: Robert Tignor & Jeremy Adelman
  298. Human Relations for Career and Personal Success, Concepts, Applications, and Skills, 11th edition: Andrew J. DuBrin
  299. The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, 6th edition: Leigh Ryan & Lisa Zimmerelli
  300. Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 16th edition: Joel Feinberg & Russ Shafer-Landau
  301. Environment and You, The (2nd Edition): Norm Christensen & Lissa Leege
  302. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, 6th edition: Jamie Rankin & Larry Wells
  303. Essentials of Marketing: A Marketing Strategy Planning Approach, 14th edition: William D. Perreault & Jr. & Joseph P. Cannon & E. Jerome McCarthy
  304. Financial & Managerial Accounting, 17th Edition: Jan R. Williams
  305. Statistics, Data Analysis, and Decision Modeling (5th Edition): James R. Evans
  306. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, 8th edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  307. Big Ideas of Early Mathematics: What Teachers of Young Children Need to Know: The Early Math Collaborative- E
  308. Bailey's Research for the Health Professional, 3rd edition: Diana Bailey & Angela Hissong
  309. Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, 7th edition: John W. Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson & Stephen D. Burd
  310. Survey of Operating Systems, 5th edition: Jane Holcombe
  311. Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents, 7th edition: Jane Case-Smith & Jane Clifford O'Brien
  312. McGraw Hill Taxation of Business Entities, 2018 Edition: SPILKER & AYERS & BARRICK & OUTSLAY & ROBINSON & WEAVER & WORSHAM
  313. Accounting Controls Guidebook: Third Edition: A Practical Guide: Steven Bragg
  314. The African-American Odyssey: Volume 2 (6th Edition): Darlene Clark Hine
  315. Exploring Psychology in Modules, 10th edition: David Myers & Nathan Dewall
  316. The Human Body in Health and Illness, 5th edition: Barbara Herlihy
  317. CPHQ Exam Secrets Study Guide: CPHQ Test Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  318. CPHQ Exam Practice Questions (First Set): CPHQ Practice Tests & Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  319. Philosophy: A Text with Readings, 13th edition: Manuel Velasquez
  320. Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics: Using Microsoft Excel 2016, 4th Edition: Neil J. Salkind
  321. Tort Law: Text and Materials, 5th edition: Mark Lunney & Ken Oliphant
  322. Graphic Design School: The Principles and Practice of Graphic Design, 5th edition: David Dabner & Sandra Stewart & Eric Zempol
  323. Microbe, 2nd edition: Michele Swanson, Gemma Reguera, Moselio Schaechter & Frederick Neidhardt
  324. An Introduction to Modern Welfare Economics: Per-Olov Johansson
  325. Human Sexuality, 4th Edition: Roger R. Hock
  326. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, 6th Edition: Lisa J. McIntyre
  327. THINK Psychology, Second Canadian Edition: Abigail A. Baird & Anjanie McCarthy
  328. General Medical Conditions in the Athlete, 2nd edition: Micki Cuppett & Katie Walsh
  329. Laboratory Techniques in Organic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Jerry R. Mohrig & David Alberg & Gretchen Hofmeister & Christine Hammond
  330. C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures, 8th edition: D. S. Malik
  331. Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere, 7th edition: C. Donald Ahrens
  332. St. Martin's Guide to Writing Short Edition with 2016 MLA Update, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper
  333. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th edition: Elaine N. Marieb, Suzanne M. Keller
  334. Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 7th Edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  335. Manual of Structural Kinesiology, 19th Edition: R.T. Floyd
  336. California: The Politics of Diversity, 8th edition: David G. Lawrence
  337. American Government and Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Lynne E. Ford
  338. Business Essentials (11th Edition): Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin
  339. Music: An Appreciation, Brief Edition (B&B Music), 9th Edition: Roger Kamien
  340. Graphic Design Solutions, 5th edition: Robin Landa
  341. Classics of Western Philosophy (Eighth Edition): Steven M. Cahn
  342. International Business, 1st Edition: J. Michael Geringer, Jeanne M. McNett, Michael S. Minor, Donald A. Ball
  343. Texas Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Mark Jones
  344. The Film Experience: An Introduction, 4th Edition: Timothy Corrigan & Patricia White
  345. Adobe® Dreamweaver® Creative Cloud™: Comprehensive: Corinne L. Hoisington & Jessica L. Minnick
  346. Web Design: Introductory (Shelly Cashman), 6th Edition: Jennifer T. Campbell
submitted by bookseller10 to eTextbooks [link] [comments]


2020.01.02 01:11 ChiefKingSosa How I would Manage Our Team this Offseason

We have an estimated 76m in cap space heading into the offseason. There are 5-6 high profile potential ($10m+ annually) contract extensions, but of those only DJ Reader and Bradley Roby are free agents this offseason.
Deshaun Watson, Laremy Tunsil and Zach Cunningham are under team control next offseason on their original rookie deals and this gives us great flexibility this offseason. It'll be interesting to see who of this group we reward this offseason- they all equally deserve big pay days.
For this first time maybe in our franchises history, it feels like we're fairly deep at every position when healthy with the exception of maybe OLB.
There are some areas we can definitely improve across the roster and here's a projection of how I think our front office should manage our roster and approach free agency/draft this offseason:

2020 Free Agent Situation
Bradley Roby- Current Contract: 1yr 10m
- Although he's missed 5 or so games this year, when he's been in he's looked the part of a true #1 corner. Been great in coverage and a good tackler. At 27 he's in his prime and there will be a big market for him across the NFL. I expect us to prioritize resigning him and to make him an offer similar to what Marcus Peters got (3yr 42m), but there is a good chance he will have offers bigger than that. I think we're committed to bringing him back, but the depth we have at corner does not necessarily make him an absolute 'cant lose'. If we get into a bidding war situation, id expect us to pull out if the price gets too high. 55% Texans resign.
Prediction: Resign with Texans on 4yr 55m~ deal with 25m~ guaranteed. Ideally front loaded. Lets say 2020 cap hit 14m.

D.J Reader- Current Contact: last year of rookie deal- $2m salary
This is the most important free agent on our team. The four year starter has emerged as one of the best interior D-lineman in the NFL and the cornerstone of our run defense. There will be a lot of interested teams and I expect him to be paid as a top 5 DT. It seems that he's at home in Houston and our front office should prioritize extending him and I'm surprised a deal hasn't been done yet. We should match any offer and even be prepared to overpay if we need to. 90% Texans resign.
Prediction: Resign with Texans on 5yr 80m~ extension with 40m guaranteed. Probably will also be front loaded so lets say appx 17m cap hit.

Carlos Hyde- Current Contract- 1yr 1.4m salary
For the first time in his career Hyde played in all 16 games and rushed for over 1000 yards. He fits the Texans system well and was a good reliable player for us all season long. Him and Duke Johnson compliment each other well and I expect the Texans to commit to this duo going forward. RB needy teams may be interested in him, but With Hyde's injury history I don't expect him to get any offers more than 7-8m a year. He seems super happy here and with Lamar Miller's 9m coming off the books I think this will straightforward. 95% Texans resign
Prediction- 3yr 20m contract- with there being no cap hit for us in year 3. 7m cap hit in 2020

Johnathan Joseph- curent contract- 1yr 5m
A Texans legend who despite his 14 years in the league is still playing a pretty high level. If he doesn't retire (which I actually don't think he will), I think we bring him back on another team friendly 1 yr deal. He's earned it and is a great mentor for some of our young corners.
Prediction- resigns with texans on 1yr 3.5m deal

Darren Fells- Current contract- 1.5m salary
He's had a solid year for us and has caught a lot of touchdown passes. Quality blocker as well. We're pretty deep at tight end between Akins, Thomas and Kahale Warring, but no one in this group of 4 (including Fells) is necessarily an exceptional player. I think we should try and bring Fells back, but I also expect there to be a relatively big market for him as he will be one of the top TE free agents this season. This ones a total coin flip but I'll say 51% texans resign
Prediction- Resigns with Texans on 2yr 12m deal

Kaim'i Fairbairn- Last year or rookie deal- 3m salary
Although he struggles earlier this year, I believe Kai'mi has earned an extension and proven he's a good kicker. He's been better the second half of the season, returning to his 2018 form. For whatever reason the NFL is going through a kicking crisis and plenty of teams would love to have a guy like Kai'mi. We should lock him down at a market rate deal above apps 4m a year. 80% chance we resign
Prediction- 3 yr 13m extension with no cap hit in year 3. 4m cap hit in 2020

AJ Mccarron- current contract- 1yr 3m
I think he looked good enough on week 17 for us to feel comfortable bringing him back. Sounds like BoB likes him. Maybe another team wants to make a run at him, but expect him to be our backup again next year. Will probably make him one of the higher paid backups in the league. 75% resign
Prediction-2 yr 9m deal with Texans

Deandre Carter- 570k salary
- I love him and he's done some really good things for us in the 20ish games he's been on the team, but with Hopkins, Fuller, Stills, Duke Johnson and KeKe Coutee under contract next year it'll be hard for him to see regular playing time at WR. Personally, I would consider shopping KeKe Coutee around the league and playing Carter instead. Could maybe get a 4th or 5th from a WR needy team or could package KeKe in some other trade. He's been a very reliable punt returner for us, but overall I think there's better situations for Carter across the league with more playing time.
Prediction- 2yr 8m deal with another team

Jaleel Addae- 900k
The veteran has been a good 3rd safety for us and I feel comfortable with him starting in the playoffs. I would love for him to be back and think that could definitely happen, but I could see him signing to be a starter on another team at solid money. If he plays well in the playoffs I could see us matching offers. I'll say 49% resigning.
Prediction- 2yr 12m deal with another team

William Hargreaves is due 10m in the last year of his deal next year, but we can cut him with zero dead money. If we lose Roby I think we might pay it, but I expect us to either cut him or offer him a restructured deal at less money. I like him but don't want to pay 10m a year if we bring back Roby and also Have Conley, Lonnie and JJo.

Priority 2021 players:
Deshaun Watson- In good faith to Deshaun, we should pay him this offseason if he doesn't completely suck in the playoffs. He's not a FA until after next season, but he's underpaid drastically right now and he's earned every dollar of what he'll get. His 2 ACL tears add some risk, but I expect him to get more money than Goff. The Texans can wait to extend him, but its inevitable. I say we bite the bullet now and pay him 35-37m a year.
Laremy Tunsil- He's one of the best LT's in football and we gave up a boatload to get him. He's been great and will eventually be the highest paid Olineman in football. The question is whether its this offseason or next year. He's getting 10m on the last year of his 1st round rookie deal next season. I say we wait until next year and retain some cap flexibility for this offseason.
Zach Cunningham- He's the fucking man and has proven himself as one of the best linebackers in football and leaders of the defense. His partner in crime B-Mac is locked up on a solid deal, but Zach is playing on a really low rookie contract making less than 2m each season he's been in the league. We don't have to pay him til next year, but I feel like we really should. It would be pretty slimy at this point not to and for him to risk injury. Depends on how aggressively we want to pursue external FA's this offseason, but I say we extend him this offseason at something like 4yr 50m
Will Fuller- He's on a team option 10m deal next year and his future purely depends on his health and caliber of play. If he balls out next offseason we'll most likely try and resign him but his asking price could be too high. He's very important to our offense and is certainly a monster when healthy, but its a total coin flip if he's on our team after next year. Wont be seeing an extension until 2021 if ever.

External Free Agent approach:
Unless we extend everyone above besides Fuller, we'll have some cap space to play around with on free agents. If we don't sign Watson, Tunsil and Cunningham we'll have a lot to play with. Overall I think we should prioritize our current guys, but try and improve our roster in a few strategic areas through free agency. Maybe make one big signing at 8-12m a year or a few mid-sized ones on top of regular depth signings. Areas I would target would be: OLB, DE, Tackle, Safety.
We locked down Whitney (imo we overpaid by a lot) Omenihu and Jacob Martin have had some promise, but overall our lack of pass rush talent outside of Watt is the biggest glaring weakness for our current roster imo. Our DE depth is also low and we could certainly look to get a better player opposite Watt as well. These would be the areas I would consider making bigger FA offers too (8-12m a year type).
We could improve on our guard depth and if we don't extend Fells could also target another veteran TE. Wouldn't expect us to make more than 1 signing over 5m a year though this offseason to an external FA if any.

Draft Approach:
With expected 3rd and 4th round compensatory picks, we actually have a good amount of draft capital this offseason. Overall we're expected to have 2, 3,3,4,4,5,7,7. Of course what we do in the draft will depend a lot on what happens in FA, but We can add a ton of value to our team with these picks and I'd want us to target these areas:
- Safety- Justin Reid is great, but I'm not convinced Gipson will be able to stay healthy and idk if Addae will be on team. Would be smart of us to get another talented young safety in the pipeline with 2nd or 3rd round pick.
- Pass Rush OLB/DE Depth- regardless if we sign an OLB/DE or not in FA, we need to get better here. I'd want to draft 2 or 3 guys in the 2-5th rounds here.
-Guard/Tackle- Our line is in good shape, but would be smart to get more depth and look to draft Fultons 2021 RG replacement. Tunsil and Howard should be great tackle duo next season, but I'm done with Chris Clark. Rod Johnson is also a FA and no idea if we'll bring him back or not. Regardless of what happens with Rod we should draft another tackle
Offensive Playmaker: Whether it be a sneaky white slot WR, track speedster or all purpose former QB, I'd like to see us try and draft a guy who will fit in well with Watson that will add another wrinkle to our offense. We have some speedy guys on our offense, but as KC shows you can never have too much explosiveness on the field.
Corner- The one lesson the NFL has learned in recent years is that you can NEVER have too many quality CBs. Every year regardless of depth, we should be drafting a CB we like in the mid rounds.
submitted by ChiefKingSosa to Texans [link] [comments]


2019.12.27 17:31 youngrichntasteless $37,000/month selling sexy chairs.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with another interview.
Today's interview is with John Humphreys of Humphreys, a brand that makes sexy chairs and stylish accessories
Some stats:

Hello! Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is John Humphreys and I started Texas Rover Company which has recently been rebranded as Humphreys. Humphreys is a lifestyle industrial design brand, which creates classically inspired leather, wood, and metal products. Another arm of the brand is Humphreys Build, which focuses on architecture and design projects.
Our flagship product is the Humphrey Chair, a twist on a fold-up camping chair made with full-grain Argentine leather. This was my first design and the product the brand was built around.
Initially, the company grew rather quickly, we sold 50 chairs at $16,000 within the first year. We gained a large following, opened new doors, and brought in new customers very early. All of which was accomplished at a high price point.
Company sales grew and the brand has been realized. Now, in addition to these products. the company is focusing on design, build and custom furniture.
image

What's your backstory and how did you come up with the idea?

Since I was a kid I have always had a sense of wonder about the world and the mechanisms behind it. Whether it be a jet engine or a windshield wiper-I have thought about the creative process behind these things since I was 10 years old.
I drew houses as a kid. My dad grew up in a home designed by a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, it was a solar home and it had an odd features. One example is, the entire back wall that was about 100 feet long and 15 feet high comprised of windows that all opened. In front, there were functioning levers that had fans which would draw airflow in and out.
Growing up I thought I wanted to be a pilot. I was described in high school by a classmate as “poetic” which I found offensive. I tried a hand in many things; managing a farm and pre-school, which were two businesses I inherited. This type of work wasn’t for me.
My feelings of unsettlement led me to a meditation community in Iowa, which introduced me to artists and builders that would change my life forever. These experiences allowed me to start building and I drew inspiration from artists and creators. As a result, leading a search to go to South American to pursue a business venture, which was where the development of the brand began in my head and on paper.
The development was inspired to create products for the nomadic, transitional explorer. To begin, I sketched 8-10 objects that would be taken from that character. A chair, blanket, a bag, shoes, canned butter, and even had 4x4 car. So that was the start, all before I actually knew what to build.
Learning to build the chair brought me to a new level of understanding style and functionality as a designer.
image
image

Take us through the process of designing, prototyping, and manufacturing your first product.

The first product we designed was the chair. It was slow to get started because there was a huge intimidation factor. I did the classic, “I’ll do it tomorrow” thing. I didn’t feel confident and certainly didn’t think I was capable. Although I wanted to do it, I delayed it out of fear.
A friend approached me and told me to do it now. She invited me to stay with her and her family who had a billiard manufacturer in Ontario in a town called Goderich. This is where we set out on a novice adventure to build this chair. We had paper sketches and cheap Walmart mock-ups of the seat and that began a year and a half process that I thought would take 3 months.
During that process, we were faced with parts that didn’t fit, seats that broke, holes a millimeter off, and fasteners that didn’t suit the idea or design. What seemed like a simple process proved to be very challenging. We ended up manufacturing our own screws with a company out of Chicago to get it where we wanted it to be. A major challenge was the seat itself.
We found it to be terribly uncomfortable. Fixing that at a later stage of the process was very frustrating. The solution required us to change the shape to something not wishful but was practical and comfortable. Initially, I despised the need but with some tweaks, it became one of my favorite features of the chair. So to close, you could say it was a long task that forced me to face fears, incompetence, and ignorance.
image
image
The process forced me to continue to problem solve and to never waiver from the obsessive desire to see something come to life that is not only beautiful but functional and comfortable. I firmly believed it needed all of these features or it didn't belong in the world. And that delayed the process but in the end, we did it.
image

Describe the process of launching the business.

Starting the business was a bit of a shock. I never thought about how to sell the chair or how it would be a viable business.
I have a memory with Yuri, a good friend who helped me kickstart my design career. We were looking at four chairs. One was a pecan with an oil finish and the others were pecan with a finish done shou sugi ban style, which is a traditional Japanese burning technique. They came out beautiful but looking at them after the process was somewhat depressing. I realized the next step was something I didn’t know how to do. I looked at Yuri and said; “That is it?”. I found the process and the fact that we went through so much to create a simple, good looking chair was so strange. I realized then that I had to make a business out of it and it was then that my experiment began.
The next day I flew to San Diego to display the chairs at a tradeshow. A friend at Bradley Mountain, a company that makes wax canvas accessories, helped me get in. I thought this was going to be huge, the start of everything.
I lugged 6 of these beautiful, though cumbersome wood and leather chairs onto the plane knowing that this was where my business would take off. However, that didn’t happen. Instead, reality kicked in. I spoke to over 100 people at that event and quickly realized I had no idea how to actually go about selling the chair. I think I was blunt, nervous, and kinda faking/floundering my way through it. As a result, I sold nothing. I went back to Texas disappointed and had to process this letdown, but I didn’t give up. I knew I had a good product.
I spent the next year developing a business strategy. At times, it did work and I saw progress. I sold the chair in a friends’ store in Houston, boot-strapped a website, and while at a party I was introduced to some players in men’s fashion such as Ouigi Theodore, founder of The Brooklyn Circus.
The following year, I attended the Liberty Fairs show in Las Vegas. There I found myself again, showing the chair awkwardly to editors, buyers, and publicists. I was blown away by it all but I sat there and did it anyway. We didn't sell that many, I walked away with a lot of contacts and parties with significant interest, although, at the time I didn't know they were. To me, the show was another unexpected and draining disappointment.
Though I felt discouraged, I kept moving forward and stayed focused on building up inventory and furthering production.
Later, to my surprise, this trade show proved to be a success and a catalyst in moving the company forward. I was written up in many publications such as GQ and landed several stores across the USA and internationally.
Sales came in online and over the phone, we began to really start selling. As people became more interested, I became confident in my product and in my place as a designer.
Overnight the Humphreys chair became a success and that period of my life was overwhelming. I had no idea what I was doing. I had no idea how to scale with my success.
All of my work was a linear progression, and it was hard to see at the moment that I was becoming more confident in business and as a creative professional.
These sales were a result of several things, a culmination of trade shows, partnering with Manready Mercantile in Houston and being featured because in press.
I landed a deal with Neiman Marcus as a direct result of my own effort and new confidence simply by cold calling them. I called and said, hey my name is john and I make a great chair and I would love to tell you about it. They called back and the rest went on from there.
image

Since launch, what has worked to attract and retain customers?

We have recently been posting new content and hosting parties to engage with customers.
Most customers find us by following HumphreysBrand and HumphreysBuild on Instagram. We’ve also gotten quite a bit of press in GQ, Clutch Magazine, Modelista, Inc, Austin Monthly, and Tribeza that is leading to sales.
Many of the customers that I build custom projects for continuing to work with me. I helped with the build of Austin’s first Intelligentsia Coffee shop. Now I’m remodeling a house for the founder, Doug Zell.

How are you doing today and what does the future look like?

Today I am taking from the lessons learned from previous years and processing them into a mechanized strategy to allow Humphreys to be more accessible to more people.
I am doing this by implementation of scaled manufacturing, more approachable pricing, favorable production costs, paid to advertise, and thoughtful content.
All of this is brand new for us and I will have to get back to you in the growth realized from these tactics.
As for the success of my companies today, we have sold several hundred leather bags and worked on quite a few build projects to make over $550K in revenue for 2019.

Through starting the business, have you learned anything particularly helpful or advantageous?

What I will do is start with my biggest lesson learned, that a business is a linear progression that requires constant effort. In the beginning, I earned significant opportunities such as deals with Neiman Marcus and various press features. What I failed to do was have a strategy to build off that momentum. Sales from this ebbed and flowed.
After a big break, they would go up and then drop off because I didn't develop a strategy to keep sales consistent. Because this whole thing has been a giant experiment for me to learn and create, I am thankful that I am here and have been given this opportunity. At the times when I feel unsure and like I want to quit, I find new doors opening with opportunities to move forward.
Something I did do right was to be careful about the energy and intention. I take care of the people I work with. I approached this creative pursuit with grit which helped me get through the dark moments of self-doubt all entrepreneurs feel. Those times were a part of the process that allowed me to come out with a stronger and more thoughtful business owner.

What platform/tools do you use for your business?

We use Shopify, pop-ups, and we have select retail accounts. I use google calendar and yellow note pads to keep me in order.

What have been the most influential books, podcasts, or other resources?

A book I very much enjoy and think of often is called Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You. I love this book because it talks about the creation of a business that exists on its own, independent of an individual. It’s an operating institution on its own.
In addition, I am a fan of Naval Ravikant and his work.

Advice for other entrepreneurs who want to get started or are just starting out?

My advice to aspiring founders is to seek mentors in the business. Also, I do believe you need to learn the hard way.
You need to push yourself and learn where the edge is and not to go over. You need to be hungry and scared because it makes you better. It will make you more serious about what you're doing.
If you have it easy, you will not have a business in the long-term. Sometimes you will find success comes easily and other times you will need to fight for it. I was naive and determined, and one might have been more strategic than I was.
My drive was more emotional than most might be. I wanted to do it and succeed, so I had to take every opportunity and refine it. That was how I did it, and now I am changing my strategy through the lessons I learned from my first business.

Where can we go to learn more?

Thanks for having me, Startup Story!!
image
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos, tools, books, and other data.
For more interviews, check out starter_story - I post new stories there daily.
Interested in sharing your own story? Send me a PM
submitted by youngrichntasteless to Business_Ideas [link] [comments]


2019.12.27 17:16 youngrichntasteless $37,000/month selling sexy chairs.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with another interview.
Today's interview is with John Humphreys of Humphreys, a brand that makes sexy chairs and stylish accessories
Some stats:

Hello! Who are you and what business did you start?

My name is John Humphreys and I started Texas Rover Company which has recently been rebranded as Humphreys. Humphreys is a lifestyle industrial design brand, which creates classically inspired leather, wood, and metal products. Another arm of the brand is Humphreys Build, which focuses on architecture and design projects.
Our flagship product is the Humphrey Chair, a twist on a fold-up camping chair made with full-grain Argentine leather. This was my first design and the product the brand was built around.
Initially, the company grew rather quickly, we sold 50 chairs at $16,000 within the first year. We gained a large following, opened new doors, and brought in new customers very early. All of which was accomplished at a high price point.
Company sales grew and the brand has been realized. Now, in addition to these products. the company is focusing on design, build and custom furniture.
image

What's your backstory and how did you come up with the idea?

Since I was a kid I have always had a sense of wonder about the world and the mechanisms behind it. Whether it be a jet engine or a windshield wiper-I have thought about the creative process behind these things since I was 10 years old.
I drew houses as a kid. My dad grew up in a home designed by a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, it was a solar home and it had an odd features. One example is, the entire back wall that was about 100 feet long and 15 feet high comprised of windows that all opened. In front, there were functioning levers that had fans which would draw airflow in and out.
Growing up I thought I wanted to be a pilot. I was described in high school by a classmate as “poetic” which I found offensive. I tried a hand in many things; managing a farm and pre-school, which were two businesses I inherited. This type of work wasn’t for me.
My feelings of unsettlement led me to a meditation community in Iowa, which introduced me to artists and builders that would change my life forever. These experiences allowed me to start building and I drew inspiration from artists and creators. As a result, leading a search to go to South American to pursue a business venture, which was where the development of the brand began in my head and on paper.
The development was inspired to create products for the nomadic, transitional explorer. To begin, I sketched 8-10 objects that would be taken from that character. A chair, blanket, a bag, shoes, canned butter, and even had 4x4 car. So that was the start, all before I actually knew what to build.
Learning to build the chair brought me to a new level of understanding style and functionality as a designer.
image
image

Take us through the process of designing, prototyping, and manufacturing your first product.

The first product we designed was the chair. It was slow to get started because there was a huge intimidation factor. I did the classic, “I’ll do it tomorrow” thing. I didn’t feel confident and certainly didn’t think I was capable. Although I wanted to do it, I delayed it out of fear.
A friend approached me and told me to do it now. She invited me to stay with her and her family who had a billiard manufacturer in Ontario in a town called Goderich. This is where we set out on a novice adventure to build this chair. We had paper sketches and cheap Walmart mock-ups of the seat and that began a year and a half process that I thought would take 3 months.
During that process, we were faced with parts that didn’t fit, seats that broke, holes a millimeter off, and fasteners that didn’t suit the idea or design. What seemed like a simple process proved to be very challenging. We ended up manufacturing our own screws with a company out of Chicago to get it where we wanted it to be. A major challenge was the seat itself.
We found it to be terribly uncomfortable. Fixing that at a later stage of the process was very frustrating. The solution required us to change the shape to something not wishful but was practical and comfortable. Initially, I despised the need but with some tweaks, it became one of my favorite features of the chair. So to close, you could say it was a long task that forced me to face fears, incompetence, and ignorance.
image
image
The process forced me to continue to problem solve and to never waiver from the obsessive desire to see something come to life that is not only beautiful but functional and comfortable. I firmly believed it needed all of these features or it didn't belong in the world. And that delayed the process but in the end, we did it.
image

Describe the process of launching the business.

Starting the business was a bit of a shock. I never thought about how to sell the chair or how it would be a viable business.
I have a memory with Yuri, a good friend who helped me kickstart my design career. We were looking at four chairs. One was a pecan with an oil finish and the others were pecan with a finish done shou sugi ban style, which is a traditional Japanese burning technique. They came out beautiful but looking at them after the process was somewhat depressing. I realized the next step was something I didn’t know how to do. I looked at Yuri and said; “That is it?”. I found the process and the fact that we went through so much to create a simple, good looking chair was so strange. I realized then that I had to make a business out of it and it was then that my experiment began.
The next day I flew to San Diego to display the chairs at a tradeshow. A friend at Bradley Mountain, a company that makes wax canvas accessories, helped me get in. I thought this was going to be huge, the start of everything.
I lugged 6 of these beautiful, though cumbersome wood and leather chairs onto the plane knowing that this was where my business would take off. However, that didn’t happen. Instead, reality kicked in. I spoke to over 100 people at that event and quickly realized I had no idea how to actually go about selling the chair. I think I was blunt, nervous, and kinda faking/floundering my way through it. As a result, I sold nothing. I went back to Texas disappointed and had to process this letdown, but I didn’t give up. I knew I had a good product.
I spent the next year developing a business strategy. At times, it did work and I saw progress. I sold the chair in a friends’ store in Houston, boot-strapped a website, and while at a party I was introduced to some players in men’s fashion such as Ouigi Theodore, founder of The Brooklyn Circus.
The following year, I attended the Liberty Fairs show in Las Vegas. There I found myself again, showing the chair awkwardly to editors, buyers, and publicists. I was blown away by it all but I sat there and did it anyway. We didn't sell that many, I walked away with a lot of contacts and parties with significant interest, although, at the time I didn't know they were. To me, the show was another unexpected and draining disappointment.
Though I felt discouraged, I kept moving forward and stayed focused on building up inventory and furthering production.
Later, to my surprise, this trade show proved to be a success and a catalyst in moving the company forward. I was written up in many publications such as GQ and landed several stores across the USA and internationally.
Sales came in online and over the phone, we began to really start selling. As people became more interested, I became confident in my product and in my place as a designer.
Overnight the Humphreys chair became a success and that period of my life was overwhelming. I had no idea what I was doing. I had no idea how to scale with my success.
All of my work was a linear progression, and it was hard to see at the moment that I was becoming more confident in business and as a creative professional.
These sales were a result of several things, a culmination of trade shows, partnering with Manready Mercantile in Houston and being featured because in press.
I landed a deal with Neiman Marcus as a direct result of my own effort and new confidence simply by cold calling them. I called and said, hey my name is john and I make a great chair and I would love to tell you about it. They called back and the rest went on from there.
image

Since launch, what has worked to attract and retain customers?

We have recently been posting new content and hosting parties to engage with customers.
Most customers find us by following HumphreysBrand and HumphreysBuild on Instagram. We’ve also gotten quite a bit of press in GQ, Clutch Magazine, Modelista, Inc, Austin Monthly, and Tribeza that is leading to sales.
Many of the customers that I build custom projects for continuing to work with me. I helped with the build of Austin’s first Intelligentsia Coffee shop. Now I’m remodeling a house for the founder, Doug Zell.

How are you doing today and what does the future look like?

Today I am taking from the lessons learned from previous years and processing them into a mechanized strategy to allow Humphreys to be more accessible to more people.
I am doing this by implementation of scaled manufacturing, more approachable pricing, favorable production costs, paid to advertise, and thoughtful content.
All of this is brand new for us and I will have to get back to you in the growth realized from these tactics.
As for the success of my companies today, we have sold several hundred leather bags and worked on quite a few build projects to make over $550K in revenue for 2019.

Through starting the business, have you learned anything particularly helpful or advantageous?

What I will do is start with my biggest lesson learned, that a business is a linear progression that requires constant effort. In the beginning, I earned significant opportunities such as deals with Neiman Marcus and various press features. What I failed to do was have a strategy to build off that momentum. Sales from this ebbed and flowed.
After a big break, they would go up and then drop off because I didn't develop a strategy to keep sales consistent. Because this whole thing has been a giant experiment for me to learn and create, I am thankful that I am here and have been given this opportunity. At the times when I feel unsure and like I want to quit, I find new doors opening with opportunities to move forward.
Something I did do right was to be careful about the energy and intention. I take care of the people I work with. I approached this creative pursuit with grit which helped me get through the dark moments of self-doubt all entrepreneurs feel. Those times were a part of the process that allowed me to come out with a stronger and more thoughtful business owner.

What platform/tools do you use for your business?

We use Shopify, pop-ups, and we have select retail accounts. I use google calendar and yellow note pads to keep me in order.

What have been the most influential books, podcasts, or other resources?

A book I very much enjoy and think of often is called Built to Sell: Creating a Business That Can Thrive Without You. I love this book because it talks about the creation of a business that exists on its own, independent of an individual. It’s an operating institution on its own.
In addition, I am a fan of Naval Ravikant and his work.

Advice for other entrepreneurs who want to get started or are just starting out?

My advice to aspiring founders is to seek mentors in the business. Also, I do believe you need to learn the hard way.
You need to push yourself and learn where the edge is and not to go over. You need to be hungry and scared because it makes you better. It will make you more serious about what you're doing.
If you have it easy, you will not have a business in the long-term. Sometimes you will find success comes easily and other times you will need to fight for it. I was naive and determined, and one might have been more strategic than I was.
My drive was more emotional than most might be. I wanted to do it and succeed, so I had to take every opportunity and refine it. That was how I did it, and now I am changing my strategy through the lessons I learned from my first business.

Where can we go to learn more?

Thanks for having me, Startup Story!!
image
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos, tools, books, and other data.
For more interviews, check out starter_story - I post new stories there daily.
Interested in sharing your own story? Send me a PM
submitted by youngrichntasteless to EntrepreneurRideAlong [link] [comments]


2019.12.21 21:36 BoomShakalakaa4 Potential Trades for Every NBA Team

Hello FB Community!
Lets talk potential trades. For trade season, getting the updates before your league mates is crucial to making the league winning pick ups. If you want to stay up to date, ahead on what's happening in the league and don’t mind the constant updates.. make a Twitter account and follow the top NBA insiders- Woj, Zach Lowe, Shams, Marc Stein and Brian Windhorst. They are typically the first to break news on almost anything NBA related. Also follow FantasyLabsNBA for daily news and injury updates. All of their Twitter links are listed below.
https://twitter.com/wojespn?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
https://twitter.com/ZachLowe_NBA?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
https://twitter.com/ShamsCharania?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
https://twitter.com/TheSteinLine?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
https://twitter.com/WindhorstESPN?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
https://twitter.com/FantasyLabsNBA?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
All of the popular fantasy basketball outlets get their info from these top analysts, so if you want to be ahead of the game, follow these guys and turn on your notifications. ( this is how many of us were able to pick up Parker before the rest of our league mates)
With that out of the way, let’s get into it. The last time a trade happened in the NBA was when Westbrook got traded to the Rockets, this happened on July 11th, 2019. This current stretch has been the longest dry spell for the trade market in the history of the NBA. Clearly the NBA is in a period of letting the dust settle but the trades should start rolling again very soon. While this trade season will likely not match the craziness of last season (post season), plenty of moves should still be made before the trade deadline. As fantasy owners/ NBA fans, staying up to date on the trade rumors or just speculating which moves may happen could give you an advantage in knowing which players to stash, watchlist or buy low in the meantime.
I’m going through every team, looking at their needs/possible trade targets to help improve their roster. These are just my opinions and I’m not accounting for cap space or suggesting possible trade candidates.. just pointing out where these rosters lack and which trades would make sense.

Atlanta Hawks
Team Needs: Front Court
Collins has been out and Jabari has filled in admirably but the C spot in still a glaring weakness. Jones has been OK and still young, Len isn't the long term answer, maybe they focus on developing Ferando? It’s also possible they run Collins at the 5 and go full small bad too… This roster is loaded w young guards and wings and they're clearly years away from making any sort of playoff run but its possible they look to fix their C situation as soon as this year.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Myles Turner: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2849608-1-player-every-nba-team-should-already-be-targeting-at-the-trade-deadline#slide1
Steven Adams: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2859140-every-nba-teams-ideal-trade-target-this-season#slide1

Brooklyn Nets
Don't believe this team will be making any moves this trade deadline, they've got the young pieces in Dinwiddie, LeVert, Allen to build around and are waiting for KD and Kyrie to have a healthy season together before making anymore major chances.

Boston Celtics
Team Needs: Center
It feels like this team is always in the trade rumor mill. The only spot they are possibly looking to upgrade is at C. Kanter is better suited to come off the bench and Theis doesn’t seem like a long term solution at starting center.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Myles Turner: https://www.inquisitr.com/5762618/myles-turner-celtics-pacers-trade-grizzlies-pick/
Kevin Love/Tristan Thompson: https://fadeawayworld.net/2019/12/13/celtics-could-trade-for-kevin-love-and-tristan-thompson-with-package-centered-around-four-players-and-draft-picks/
Julius Randle (No real Rumor): https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2867410-nba-rumors-latest-trade-buzz-on-andre-iguodala-knicks-julius-randle-more
"Clearly not the star NYK was hoping he'd be but could be great as a double-double machine off the bench for a team like the Celtics or Mavericks, he could be a worthy investment." for the remainder of his current deal.

Steven Adams: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2856419-nba-trade-rumors-thunders-asking-price-for-steven-adams-leaks

Charlotte Hornets
I don't see this team making any trades, maybe they'll make some salary dumping moves.

Chicago Bulls
Only positive move this franchise can make is firing Jim, Pax, and Gar.


Cleveland Cavaliers
This team is going to be selling. Everything is pointing at Kevin Love being traded but guys like Jordan Clarkson and Tristan Thompson are also available at the trade deadline. Moves to the front court could help return value to Cedi Osman, Larry Nance Jr, and Ante Zizic.
Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Jordan Clarkson: https://thesixersense.com/2019/12/11/sixers-rumors-jordan-clarkson-potential-target/
Tristan Thompson: https://hoopshype.com/storyline/tristan-thompson-trade/

Dallas Mavericks/ Denver Nuggets
I’m pretty sure these teams will not make any trades, but I could see them team purse players in the “buyout market.”


Detroit Pistons
Trade Needs: Quality Starting Point Guard
This team is interesting to me. Are they keeping or trading Blake Griffin? Are they really going to trade Andre Drummond? Who knows. However, this team does need a better quality PG there is no question about it.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Blake Griffin: https://pistonpowered.com/2019/11/26/potential-landing-spots-blake-griffin/
Andre Drummond: https://pistonpowered.com/2019/12/16/detroit-pistons-trade-rumors-andre-drummond-dallas/
Jrue Holiday: https://pistonpowered.com/2019/12/18/detroit-pistons-shouldnt-all-in-jrue-holiday/
Dennis Smith Jr: No current rumor connection between DSJ and the Pistons. However Knicks are open to trading Dennis Smith Jr. and Teams have expressed interest.
D’angelo Russell: https://clutchpoints.com/pistons-rumors-nothing-interesting-going-on-in-terms-dangelo-russell-to-detroit-trade/
(I checked in with another league source and was told there is nothing interesting going on.)
Chris Paul: https://okcthunderwire.usatoday.com/2019/08/01/five-chris-paul-trades-that-make-sense-after-december-15/ (No Current Rumor) (CP3 may stay in OKC this year.)


Golden State Warriors
This team is in the same state as the Brooklyn Nets. They'll develop what they have and are waiting for Klay and Curry to return and see if they can still compete in the West. However, if they look to deal Dlo, Ky Bowman showed that can put up value when called upon.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
D’Angelo Russell: https://fadeawayworld.net/2019/12/17/adrian-wojnarowski-explains-the-warriors-plan-for-dangelo-russell/ (May not be traded)


Houston Rockets
Team Needs: Wing Defender
House got off to a hot start, however that quickly flamed out rather quickly. They might need another wing defender to help out when they play Clippers/Lakers in the playoffs. A 3rd scoring option would also help take the load off of Harden and Westbrook.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Robert Covington: https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nba/news/nba-trade-rumors- rockets-timberwolves-robert-covington/p04x4a6wcu4a1khvrt4ny6144
Danilo Gallinari: No Current Rumor. If you are in the market for a Small forward and can’t get Robert Covington. Danilo might be the next best thing.


Indiana Pacers
This team just needs to get Victor Oladipo back. There was rumors circling around the Myles Turner could be traded, if that’s the case it’s possible that might open minutes up for Goga Bitadze.


Los Angeles Clippers/ Los Angeles Lakers
Maybe LeBron signs another vet? I don't think the Clippers make any moves.

Memphis Grizzlies
Team Needs: Shooting Guard
This team may not do anything at the trade deadline. Listed some hypotheticals. They are trying to trade Andre Iguodala for possible draft picks.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Demar DeRozan: https://fadeawayworld.net/2019/12/13/grizzlies-could-acquire-demar-derozan-for-jonas-valanciunas-and-jae-crowde
Jordan Clarkson: No rumor yet. Just an idea, since the Cavs are looking to possibly sell any of their vets for draft picks.
Jrue Holiday: No current Rumor, or even thought of a Rumor. Jrue loves to play SG. He is also a quality guy off the court as well. If I want someone to mentor my future PG/SG. It would be Jrue Holiday.


Milwaukee Bucks
No idea, this roster is deep.

Miami Heat
There were rumors that they were after Chris Paul at the start of the season, now they have switched their focus to acquiring Jrue Holiday.
Jrue Holiday: https://www.azcentral.com/story/sports/nba/suns/2019/12/18/jrue-holiday-trade-destinations-phoenix-suns-miami-heat-minnesota-timberwolves/2688672001/

Minnesota Timberwolves
Team Needs: Point Guard
KAT’s tenor in MIN feels a lot like what happened with AD with the Pelicans.. Since drafting KAT the Wolves have not done anything special to help him. One playoff appearance. Help this man. Jeff Teague isn't the answer to a deep playoff run and Culver definitely isn't ready for that

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Jrue Holiday: https://uproxx.com/dimemag/jrue-holiday-pelicans-trade-rumors-heat-suns-timberwolves-best-destinations/
D’angelo Russell: https://dunkingwithwolves.com/2019/12/17/nba-rumors-minnesota-timberwolves-will-have-plenty-of-potential-trade-partners/
( It’s also very possible Dlo doesn’tget moved)
Dennis Smith Jr.: https://clutchpoints.com/timberwolves-news-minnesota-interested-in-trading-for-knicks-dennis-smith-j


New Orleans Pelicans
Look for this team to be sellers at the trade deadline. Jrue Holiday and JJ Redick could be traded given the right price. This would open up more touches for Josh Hart, Nickeil Alexander-Walker, and possibly more touches of Lonzo Ball.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
JJ Redick: https://behindthebuckpass.com/2019/12/16/milwaukee-bucks-rumors-j-j-redick-robert-covington-trade-targets/
Jrue Holiday: https://www.cbssports.com/nba/news/jrue-holiday-trade-rumors-bucks-heat-headline-list-of-teams-that-make-sense-for-the-pelicans-star-guard/


New York Knicks
This team could be sellers at the trade deadline. We have heard rumors circling around Julius Randle, Marcus Morris, and Dennis Smith Jr. If one of these guys move it will open up minutes for guys like Elfrid Payton/ Frank Ntilikina or even Bobby Portis to get more minutes.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Julius Randle: https://nba.nbcsports.com/2019/12/17/rumor-knicks-open-to-trading-julius-randle/
Marcus Morris: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2866502-knicks-trade-rumors-teams-believe-marcus-morris-could-return-1st-round-pick
Dennis Smith Jr.: https://dailyknicks.com/2019/12/19/knicks-trade-rumors-several-teams-interested-dennis-smith-j


Oklahoma City Thunder
This team would also be sellers at the trade deadline. Look for this team to trade players like Chris Paul, Danilo Gallinari, Dennis Schroder, or Steven Adams. If any of these players get traded that means more minutes/ opportunity for players like Shai Gilgeous-Alexander or Nerlens Noel.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Chris Paul: No current trade rumor, NBA executives believe Chris Paul is staying putting in OKC. https://allucanheat.com/2019/12/19/miami-heat-chris-paul-fuss-white-noise/
Danilo Gallinari: https://www.forbes.com/sites/nicholascrain/2019/12/12/oklahoma-city-thunder-potential-danilo-gallinari-trade-packages/#6dc82e286837
Dennis Schroder: https://okcthunderwire.usatoday.com/2019/12/15/market-dennis-schroder-why-trade-minnesota-might-work/
Steven Adams: https://fadeawayworld.net/2019/12/19/nba-rumors-10-players-who-could-be-traded-before-the-february-deadline/

Orlando Magic
Not sure what this team is really doing. I really do not pay close attention to this team. If anyone has insight on this team that would be great.

Philadelphia 76ers/ Toronto Raptors/ Utah Jazz/ Phoenix Suns/ Sacramento Kings
These five teams will most likely not make any trades.

Portland Trailblazers
Portland is looking to buy. They have been linked to several stars through the league. Kevin Love has been rumored to be traded here. Danilo Gallinari has also been rumored to be traded here. This team has the most cap space, so they might want to make some trades so they can make a push to the playoffs.


San Antonio Spurs
I’m not sure if they are going to trade Demar Derozan. It’s rumored that if he wants to be traded he wants to be traded to an Eastern Conference Team.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Demar Derozan: https://fadeawayworld.net/2019/12/03/nba-trade-rumors-5-best-destinations-for-demar-derozan-3/

Toronto Raptors
Pretty much all that is said about the Raptors that they we are sticking with what they have.
https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2855927-nba-rumors-latest-buzz-on-possible-raptors-trade-and-kevin-martin

Washington Wizards
This team just needs to stay healthy. I do not believe Beal is getting traded. They could look to move Davis Bertans. Davis has been great this year, however they do not have the best cap space. If they sign Davis Bertans they will limit themselves during the FA. They could move on from him just based off the cap space.

Possible Trade Targets/ Rumor Link
Davis Bertans: https://hoopshype.com/storyline/davis-bertans-trade/
submitted by BoomShakalakaa4 to fantasybball [link] [comments]


2019.10.05 16:26 Speig14 My 1st 2020 mock draft

 Is it ever to early for NFL mock drafts? I think not. We are currently heading into week 5 of the NFL season and week 6 of the college season and we are starting to really learn team weaknessea and strengths of the pro teams and the top players in college. Fans, especially of the bad teams, are starting to ask who should my team draft? So here is my thoughts on the draft. While yes many things can change between week 5 and end of the Superbowl such as teams catching fire or catching a cold, a major injury, or a major trade could happen so keep that in mind as you see what your favorite team grabs to build the future. And with that the 2020 NFL Draft opens up with… 
  1. Miami Dolphins select Chase Young, Edge Ohio State • WHAT? No QB? But this season is tank for Tua! As a Miami and Alabama fan I love Tua and want him on my team, but Josh Rosen has definitely been showing the ability that made him a top 10 pick last year (and I’m not really a Rosen fan). So now to Young. The Miami defense has played surprisingly respectable so far with becoming a solid run defense and good play from young and NFL inexperienced linebackers is being hurt bad by no pass rush. Young is without a doubt the top rusher and has top NFL potential and will make life harder on opposing teams. Charles Harris has been a bust and Taco Charlton does have 2 sacks, 3 hurries, and 2 tackles for loss can he become the player he was expected?
  2. Cincinnati Bengals select Tua Tagovailoa, QB Alabama • Yes it is time to move on from Andy Dalton. Has he been bad? No. The Bengals though have become stale and the time has come for Zac Taylor to start his regime and give this team a spark. At Alabama Tua has shown the ability to make big throws and smart throws. Able to manipulate a defense with his eyes and open up receivers that way and even throw them open. While Tua does have good speed he prefers to move to extend plays giving his team more time to get open which I’m sure AJ Green, Tyler Boyd, Tyler Eifert would love against the tough AFC North defenses (and not to mention the defense).
  3. Washington Redskins select Andrew Thomas, OT Georgia • With Trent Williams bound and determined to leave the nation capital they need to bring in a replacement and protect Haskins and open holes for Guice ,eventually maybe, of AP. Thomas has been dominant against SEC defenses and would be an amazing friend to help Haskins build and become better by standing up to make plays.
  4. Denver Broncos select Jerry Jeudy, WR Alabama • While some people are clamoring for Tua (spoiler he gone already) or another QB Elway did draft Drew Lock last year and that’s who I see leading the Broncos fulltime next season and why not give him two very talented receivers to throw to? A very fast and excellent route running Jeudy teaming with the big 6’4” 216lb Courtland Sutton would be a great duo for big arm Lock.
  5. New York Jets select AJ Epenesa, Edge Iowa • While yes the Jets could easily select a wide receiver or an offensive lineman I think they keep trying to build the defense that they spent A LOT of money on this past offseason. With a division consisting of 2 recent top 10 picks in Josh Allen and Josh Rosen and then of course the ageless Tom Brady and can’t forget the emergence of a very good looking AFC QB group including Patrick Mahomes, Dashaun Watson, Baker Mayfield, Lamar Jackson the pass rush could be extremely important.
  6. Arizona Cardinals select CeeDee Lamb, WR Oklahoma • Yes they should go offensive line Larry Fitzgerald is almost done and yes they have Christian Kirk, but the Cards double dip Oklahoma and bring in one of Murray top targets from last year in Lamb. The plan is to make Murray more at home and make that throw the ball offense more dangerous.
  7. Miami Dolphins select Tristan Wirfs, OT Iowa • Well their back. This is the pick from trading Minkah Fitzpatrick to the Steelers and with it they either replace Laremy Tunsil at left tackle or shift him inside to guard to solidify the interior with Michael Deiter. Bring in Rosen some help with this dreadful line and allow him some time to find the receivers or open up holes for the running backs.
  8. Atlanta Falcons select Derrick Brown, IDL Auburn • This is one team I don’t expect to be here at the end of the season. This team is too good to be this high. The d-line is very talented with Tak McKinley, Vic Beasley, Grady Jarrett. Finish it off with the lethality by bringing in who would’ve been a top defensive player last year. Get after the explosive NFC South and NFC offenses in general.
  9. Jacksonville Jaguars select Henry Ruggs, WR Alabama • Minshew mania has taken over Jacksonville, but is he the future guy? Well if not they signed Nick Foles to a big deal and if Minshew doesn’t take it then Foles is back and the receiving group is…well lacking still. So bring in Ruggs who is unbelievably fast, great hands that don’t drop, good routes, and a very good blocker. Add Ruggs to that group and they are deep and dangerous.
  10. Indianapolis Colts select Grant Delpit, S LSU • After Andrew Luck sudden retirement they gave Jacoby Brissett an extension but not a big extension. Could they draft a QB like Herbet, Fromm, Eason absolutely, but unless Brissett just disappoints this year then they address other parts of the team. So they pick Delpit and bring in reinforcements against the pass against an upcoming AFC South with DeAndre Hopkins, Will Fuller, AJ Brown, Dede Westbrook, DJ Chark.
  11. Baltimore Ravens select Isaiah Simmons, LB Clemson • With the offense seemingly addressed in all phases it’s time to finish addressing the defense. There are holes in the defense and in Ravens fashion they address from the inside out starting at middle linebacker. With the ability to play sideline to sideline and play the run inside and lead what has been a great defense is a great way to get the Ravens defense back to greatness.
  12. New York Giants select Laviska Shenault Jr, WR Colorado • They have their running back in Saquan Barkley and maybe their QB in Daniel Jones so now address the wide receiver and bring in a playmaker to fill the hole left by Odell Beckham. An explosive playmaker that is use to a high catch count and after the catch turning into running back could really help this offense and help the defense by putting more points on the board.
  13. Las Vegas Raiders select Creed Humphrey, IOL Oklahoma • The Raiders are gambling that Carr is the guy to lead this team after passing on Justin Herbert and Jack Fromm. So they bring in protection for Carr and a hole opener for Josh Jacobs. Being used to pass blocking a lot at Oklahoma Humphrey should be able to help start the new Vegas show.
  14. Philadelphia Eagles select Xavier McKinney, S Alabama • The Eagles cornerback woes have improved over the last couple years with Ronald Darby and previous picks finally panning out. But McLeod has been by himself on the backside. So bring in McKinney to help patrol and cause mayhem going after the ball.
  15. Tennessee Titans select Justin Herbert, QB Oregon • Yes you read that right. Titans get tired of Marcus Mariota and the injuries and lackluster up and down play. So they bring in a fresh start in Herbert to give a new boost to this overall good team stuck in mediocrity. Herbert big arm and athleticism can bring in a fresh start and replace the former Oregon QB with a new Oregon QB.
  16. Carolina Panthers select Kristian Fulton, CB LSU • The Carolina defense is coming together and very good. The offense needs some work but this isn’t the time. For awhile now the defense has needed a better secondary so help it out and address it with Fulton. LSU defensive backs have very coming into the at a very high caliber and Fulton will continue it and help legitimize the secondary with his big frame and excellent man coverage skills.
  17. Tampa Bay Buccaneers select Julian Okwara, Edge Norte Dame • The Bucs defense has been good so far this season and Shaquil Barrett is having a great season so let’s get him a partner on the other side. Could they get a new QB? Yes absolutely and this might change later, but Winston has a lot to show this year.
  18. Minnesota Vikings select Jake Fromm, QB Georgia • Yes despite the big contract Vikings bite the bullet and move on from Kirk Cousins. They bring in the player that led Georgia to a national championship his freshman year. Bring in a confident QB that is very accurate, great arm, just athletic enough to extend plays. Fromm will take the risks to get the ball to Theilan and Diggs (as of now still on the team).
  19. Detroit Lions select Paulson Adebo, CB Stanford • The Lions offense is seemingly back so gotta continue to fix the defense. One thing that the Lions have forever been trying to fix is the cornerback opposite of Darius Slay. With last season the lions signing Trey Flowers maybe in free agency this is the start of a great defense.
  20. Seattle Seahawks select Tyler Biadasz, C Wisconsin • The Seattle offensive line has needed work for years. While it’s better then it was in recent years the interior still needs help since Max Unger got traded. Not only will Russell Wilson benefit but so will that running game with a Wisconsin lineman in the middle.
  21. Cleveland Browns select Lucas Niang, OT TCU • The 2019 NFL Draft saw the Browns needing a left tackle for the first time since 2006 season. While in that draft they decided to go with Greg Robinson and while he’s been serviceable he isn’t the long term answer. While they miss out on the top 2 tackles in this draft in Thomas and Wirfs they get Niang. A player used to Big 12 play blocking for a former Big 12 in Baker Mayfield. A better pass blocker than run blocker, but that’s what Cleveland needs to help Mayfield not to end up flushed out or on his back.
  22. Los Angeles Chargers select Jordan Love, QB Utah State • It’s time. The Chargers finally draft the successor to Phillip Rivers and it’s the fast rising Love. Still raw and not ready to start in the NFL immediately so Carson California is perfect able to sit behind Rivers for last couple years. The arm and athleticism is just too good for Chargers to pass on.
  23. Dallas Cowboys select Jeffrey Okudah, CB Ohio State • With it looking like the Cowboys will be losing Byron Jones the Cowboys look to replace him. With the success of OSU cornerbacks in recent years Dallas hope to continue to capture the magic.
  24. Green Bay Packers select Jalen Reagor, WR TCU • The Packers defense actually looks pretty good, the running game seems to be stable, offensive line is still good enough. But the receiving game now needs someone opposite of Davante Adams. The current group has not produced a reliable enough of a playmaker to lean on. While Aaron Rodgers doesn’t seem to be the same and career winding down he still has enough to guide them but needs that second option.
  25. Miami Dolphins select Bryce Hall, CB Virginia • Guess who’s back. Back again. Miami’s back up and back addressing the pass defense by getting Hall to be opposite of Xavien Howard. The Dolphins currently have Eric Rowe, Chris Lammons, and Jomal Wiltz currently revolving opposite of Howard and none are being effective and QBs just target that side of the field and have lots of success. The big 4 year starter should be a big upgrade.
  26. Buffalo Bills select Alton Robinson, Edge Syracuse • In the last draft Buffalo selected a very raw but talented linebacker in Tremaine Edwards. This year they draft another raw talented player, but at edge to be opposite of Jerry Hughes and maybe even replace him. Robinson will be joining a very good defense with lots of time to learn.
  27. Los Angels Rams select Raekwon Davis, DL Alabama • Absolutely the Rams could get edge rusher or offensive line help, but I have the Rams getting Davis who is a very good run stopper and a good pass rusher with a high motor. With this pick though they could very well go other ways.
  28. Las Vegas Raiders select Yuter Gross-Matos, Edge Penn State • Raiders are back up and this time they go defensively and bring in another pass rusher. Yes they brought in Colin Ferrell last year but he needs help. What can make a defense so much better is a good pass rush. I mean you can never have enough right?
  29. New Orleans Saints select Joe Burrow, QB LSU • While I’m not a huge Burrow fan if what we’re seeing from him so far this year is the real Joe Burrow he seems to be the perfect replacement for Drew Brees. While they have Teddy Bridgewater and Taysom Hill I’m not sold and I don’t think the team is that they are the future. Burrow has a big arm and likes to throw the ball deep and a lot. Which I do believe the Saints still throw the ball quite a bit.
  30. New England Patriots select Curtis Weaver, Edge Boise State • Many people have the Patriots taking a QB in this spot, but well I think Stidham could develop. And while the Patriots are able to develop a pass rush from anywhere on the outside they have Chase Winovich and not much more so Weaver seems to fit them pretty well. More the power rushers that double as run stopper. They just want versatility.
  31. San Francisco 49ers select Trevon Diggs, CB Alabama • While the 49ers do need offensive line here they go with Diggs to add to the constantly struggling secondary. Richard Sherman doesn’t have many years left so bring in the former wide receiver to play opposite and learn from one of the best cornerbacks in the last decade.
  32. Kansas City Chiefs select AJ Terrell, CB Clemson • A bit of a reach here but the Chiefs are still needing secondary help to help cover for the lack of pass rush. Since the Chiefs traded Marcus Peters (which is starting to look like a win now) and now Eric Berry this secondary is really lacking a good solid piece.
Round 2 33. Miami Dolphins Travis Etienne RB Clemson • Kenyan Drake is in his last year and I don’t think Ballage, Walton, or Gaskin is iit. 34. Cincinnati Bengals Alex Leatherwood • The Bengals need a lot of help on the o-line and Leatherwood has played tackle and guard at high levels. 35. Indianapolis Colts Jacob Eason QB Washington • Only time will tell is Jacoby Brissett is the guy but get a very good QB on rookie deal just in case. 36. Denver Broncos Javon Kinlaw IDL • Broncos have outside pass disruptions but a interior disruption can make them better. 37. New York Jets Collin Johnson WR Texas • Jets need a big target for Sam Darnold and Johnson is a big 6’6” target. 38. Arizona Cardinals Prince Tega Wanogho T Auburn • Cardinals finally bring in protection for Kyler Murray in a very quick and raw tackle. 39. Pittsburgh Steelers K'Lavon Chaisson Edge LSU • Steelers bring in a versatile pass rusher opposite of TJ Watt to get after the speedy QBs in their division and conference. 40. Atlanta Falcons Brandon Jacobs S Texas • Falcons bring in a thumper safety to help in the run game against very good NFC South running teams. 41. Jacksonville Jaguars D’Andre Swift RB Georgia • Jags give up on Fournette who has not produced or been around to produce and bring in a different mold of running back. 42. Indianapolis Colts Grant Calcaterre TE Oklahoma • I don’t think Eric Ebron is longterm but more of a flash in the pan. 43. Baltimore Ravens Shawn Wade CB Ohio State • After another injury Jimmy Smith tenure might be done in Baltimore. 44. New York Giants Kenny Willekes Edge Michigan State • Bring in an edge rush opposite of Oshane Ximines and this d-line looks very stout. 45. Chicago Bears Jaylon Johnson CB Utah • Prince Amukamara is probably going to be after this year so bring in Johnson to go opposite of Kyle Fuller. 46. Philadelphia Eagles Jalen Hurts QB Oklahoma • Carson Wentz very good when he plays, but has been bit by the injury bug bad. 47. Tennessee Titans Brycen Hopkins TE Purdue • Delanie Walker has been injured a lot and career is about over. 48. Carolina Panthers Hamsah Nasirildeen S Florida State • Carolina finishes up addressing the secondary to pair with Eric Reid. 49. Tampa Bay Buccaneers Jonathan Taylor RB Wisconsin • Peyton Barber and Ronald Jones have not progressed as hoped so it’s time to replace them. 50. Minnesota Vikings Rashad Lawrence IDL • After losing Shariff Floyd the void has been difficult to fill, Lawrence should fill it. 51. Detroit Lions Tee Higgins WR Clemson • Lions offense is looking like a complete unit so bring in another weapon for Stafford. 52. Seattle Seahawks Jabari Zuniga Edge Florida • After trading Frank Clark the Seahawks need to fill the hole. 53. Cleveland Browns Darryl Williams IOL Mississippi State • Browns continue to build the o-line for Mayfield and Nick Chubb. 54. Los Angeles Chargers Jared Pinkney TE Vanderbilt • Hunter Henry can’t stay on the field so it is time to put effort to move on. 55. Dallas Cowboys Reggie Floyd S Virginia Tech • Cowboys finish the defense by solidifying the secondary. (This pick is if they resign Amari Cooper) 56. Green Bay Packers Alaric Jackson T Iowa • Improve the o-line for Rodgers sake. 57. Houston Texans JK Dobbins RB Ohio State • Carlos Hyde is a band-aid and Duke Johnson hasn’t proved to be anything beyond a receiving back. 58. Buffalo Bills Tyler Johnson WR Minnesota • Josh Allen needs someone to throw the ball to. 59. Los Angeles Rams Anfernee Jennings Edge Alabama • Rams continue to bring in support for Aaron Donald. 60. Chicago Bears Trey Adams T Washington • Give one more season to give Trubisky every chance to build and succeed by improving the o-line. 61. Miami Dolphins KJ Hill WR Ohio State • With Albert Wilson being injured the Dolphins move on to a younger version. 62. New England Patriots Hunter Bryant TE Washington • Patriots fill the void left by Rob Gronkowski retirement. 63. Kansas City Chiefs Monty Rice LB Georgia • Chiefs are still needing to fix the linebackers since the end of their great groups a few years back. 64. Seattle Seahawks Tylan Wallace WR Oklahoma • Russell Wilson needs more weapons to get the ball to.
submitted by Speig14 to NFL_Draft [link] [comments]


2019.04.05 05:49 jaydenblochhh [SHARE][FREE DOWNLOAD] Textbook Megathread #4 PDF

Download Any of These as PDFs for FREE at
https://gemverify.com/585933

  1. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes, and Systems, 6th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  2. Precalculus Essentials: J. S. Ratti & Marcus S. McWaters
  3. Genetics- A Conceptual Approach, 6th edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  4. The Global Casino, Fifth Edition: An Introduction to Environmental Issues: Nick Middleton
  5. Macroeconomics, 2nd Canadian Edition: Paul Krugman & Robin Wells & Iris Au
  6. Biology: A Global Approach, 10th Global edition: Neil A. Campbell & Jane B. Reece & Lisa Urry & Michael L Cain & Steven A Wasserman & Author
  7. Information Technology Project Management, 5th Edition: Jack T. Marchewka
  8. Clinical Laboratory Hematology, 3rd Edition: Shirlyn B. Kenzie & Lynne Williams
  9. Exploring Medical Language, 10th edition: Myrna LaFleur Brooks & Danielle LaFleur Brooks
  10. Business Essentials, Eighth Canadian Edition: Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin & Frederick A. Starke & George Dracopoulos
  11. Chemistry Atoms First, 3rd edition: Julia Burdge & Jason Overby
  12. Sensation and Perception, 2nd edition: Steven Yantis & Richard Abrams
  13. Abnormal Psychology, 8th Global Edition: Thomas F. Oltmanns & Robert E. Emery
  14. Documentation Manual for Occupational Therapy, 4th edition : Crystal A. Gateley & Sherry Borcherding
  15. Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement, 13th edition: Michelle A. Green
  16. Java For Everyone: Compatible with Java 5, 6, and 7, 2nd Edition: Cay S. Horstmann
  17. Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application, 9th edition: Bessie L. Marquis & Carol J. Huston
  18. Economics: The User's Guide: Ha-Joon Chang
  19. Gendered Lives, 12th edition: Julia T. Wood & Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz
  20. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  21. Community as Partner: Theory and Practice in Nursing (Anderson, Community as Partner), 7th edition: Elizabeth T. Anderson & Judith McFarlane
  22. Calculus - Early Transcendentals, 8th edition: James Stewart
  23. Willard and Spackman's Occupational Therapy, 12th edition: Barbara A. Schell & Marjorie Scaffa & Glen Gillen & Ellen S. Cohn
  24. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th edition: M. Morris Mano
  25. Principles of Risk Management and Insurance, 13th Global Edition: George E. Rejda & Michael McNamara
  26. Community & Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Public's Health, 9th edition: Cherie Rector
  27. Environmental Science for AP®, Second Edition: Andrew Friedland & Rick Relyea
  28. College Algebra, 4th Edition: Cynthia Y. Young
  29. Sustainable Urban Development Reader (Routledge Urban Reader Series), 3rd Edition: Wheeler and Beatly
  30. Psychiatric Nursing: Assessment, Care Plans, and Medications, 9th edition: Townsend, Mary
  31. Managing Business Process Flows (3rd Edition): Ravi Anupindi
  32. Precalculus, 10th edition: Michael Sullivan
  33. Psychology in Your Life (Second Edition): Sarah Grison & Todd Heatherton & Michael Gazzaniga
  34. Introductory Algebra, 12th edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  35. American History: Connecting with the Past-Vol 2: Alan Brinkley
  36. Cities of the World: Regional Patterns and Urban Environments, 6th edition: Brunn, Stanley D.; Hays-Mitchell, Maureen; Zeigler, Donald J.
  37. Strategies for Successful Writing, 11th edition: James A. Reinking & Robert A. von der Osten
  38. College Algebra with Modeling & Visualization, 6th edition: Gary K. Rockswold
  39. Understanding Psychology (11th Edition): Tony Morris
  40. Understanding ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS: A Worktext, 3rd edition: Mary Jo Bowie
  41. Making America: A History of the United States, Volume 2: Since 1865, Brief 6th edition: Carol Berkin & Christopher Miller & Robert Cherny & James Gormly & Douglas Egerton
  42. Crossroads and Cultures, Volume II: Since 1300: A History of the World's Peoples: Bonnie G. Smith & Marc Van De Mieroop & Richard von Glahn & Kris Lane
  43. Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 4th edition: Joan L. Slonczewski & John W. Foster
  44. Web Design: Introductory (HTML), 4th edition: Gary B. Shelly & Jennifer T. Campbell
  45. Problems from Philosophy, 3rd Edition: James Rachels & Stuart Rachels
  46. Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America (Fourth Edition): John Charles Chasteen
  47. Data Structures and Algorithms Using Java: William McAllister
  48. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, 6th edition: Edward Allen & Joseph Iano
  49. Principles of Instrumental Analysis, 7th edition: Douglas A. Skoog & F. James Holler & Stanley R. Crouch
  50. Hands-On Microsoft Windows Server 2016, 2nd Edition: Michael Palmer
  51. A Guide to Computer User Support for Help Desk and Support Specialists, 6th edition: Fred Beisse
  52. The World A History, Volume One (3rd Edition): Felipe Fernández-Armesto
  53. Discovering the Life Span, 4th edition: Robert S. Feldman
  54. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  55. Ethics for the Information Age, 7th Edition: Michael J. Quinn
  56. Human Communication in Society, 4th edition: Jess K. Alberts & Thomas K. Nakayama & Judith N. Martin
  57. Traditions and Encounters Vol 1 (History), 6th edition: Jerry Bentley
  58. E-Commerce 2016: Business, Technology, Society, 12th edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Carol Traver
  59. Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions, 6th edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  60. Diversity Consciousness: Opening Our Minds to People, Cultures, and Opportunities, 4th edition: Richard D. Bucher
  61. MCSA Guide to Administering Microsoft Windows Server 2012/R2, Exam 70-411: Greg Tomsho
  62. Your Office: Microsoft Excel 2016 Comprehensive (Your Office for Office 2016 Series): Amy S. Kinser & Kristyn Jacobson & Eric Kinser & Brant Paige Moriarity
  63. Principles of Macroeconomics (Second Edition): Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  64. Veterinary Surgery: Small Animal Expert Consult: 2-Volume Set, 2nd edition: Spencer A. Johnston
  65. College Algebra, 7th edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  66. Certified Paralegal Review Manual: A Practical Guide to CP Exam Preparation, 4th edition: Virginia Koerselman Newman
  67. American Government: Power and Purpose (Fourteenth Core Edition): Stephen Ansolabehere & Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Kenneth A. Shepsle
  68. Numerical Analysis, 10th edition: Richard L. Burden & J. Douglas Faires & Annette M. Burden
  69. The Mechanical Design Process, 5th edition: David G. Ullman
  70. Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment, Development, 6th edition: Rowntree,Lewis, Price & Wyckoff
  71. The Old Testament Story (9th Edition): John Tullock
  72. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams
  73. Differential Diagnosis of Common Complaints, 6th edition: Robert H. Seller & Andrew B. Symons
  74. The Litigation Paralegal: A Systems Approach, 6th edition: James W. H. McCord & Pamela Tepper
  75. Ethical Problems in the Practice of Law (Aspen Casebook), 4th edition: Lisa G. Lerman & Philip G. Schrag
  76. Principles of Auditing & Other Assurance Services, 20th edition: O. Ray Whittington, Kurt Pany
  77. Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th edition: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating: Rhea Paul & Courtenay Norbury
  78. Organisational Behaviour Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Australasian Edition: Wood, Jack; Zeffane, Rachid M.; Fromholtz, Michele
  79. Essentials of Corporate Finance, 9th Edition: Stephen A. Ross, Randolph W. Westerfield, Bradford D. Jordan
  80. Development of Children, 7th edition: Cynthia Lightfoot
  81. Asian Art: Marika Sardar & Dorinda Neave & Lara C. W. Blanchard
  82. Macroeconomics (6th Edition): R. Glenn Hubbard & Anthony P. O'Brien
  83. Electron Flow in Organic Chemistry: A Decision-Based Guide to Organic Mechanisms (2nd Edition): Scudder, Paul H.(Author)
  84. Biochemistry, 1st edition: Roger L. Miesfeld & Megan M. McEvoy
  85. Stress Management for Life: A Research-Based Experiential Approach, 4th edition: Michael Olpin & Margie Hesson
  86. Engineering Fundamentals: An Introduction to Engineering, 5th edition: Saeed Moaveni
  87. Articulation and Phonological Disorders: Speech Sound Disorders in Children (8th Edition): John E. Bernthal & Nicholas W. Bankson & Peter Flipsen Jr.
  88. Communication in a Civil Society: Shelley D. Lane & Ruth Anne Abigail & John Gooch
  89. The Immune System, 4th Edition: Peter Parham
  90. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, 4th edition: Anthony J. Hayter
  91. Social Psychology: The Science of Everyday Life: Jeff Greenberg & Toni Schmader & Jamie Arndt & Mark Landau
  92. Foundations in Microbiology, 9th edition: Talaro
  93. Business Analysis and Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 5th edition: Krishna Palepu & Paul Healy
  94. Introductory Chemistry, 8th Edition: Steven S. Zumdahl & Donald J. Decoste
  95. Single Variable Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition: James Stewart
  96. Foundations of Education, Third Edition: Volume I: History and Theory of Teaching Children and Youths with Visual Impairments: Various
  97. Campbell Essential Biology with Physiology, 5th Global Edition: Eric J. Simon & Jean L. Dickey & Jane B. Reece & Kelly A. Hogan
  98. Mastering the World of Psychology, 5th edition: Ellen Green Wood & Samuel E. Wood & Denise Boyd
  99. Business Data Networks and Security (10th Edition): Raymond R. Panko & Julia L. Panko
  100. America's History, Volume I: To 1877, 8th edition: James A. Henretta & Eric Hinderaker & Rebecca Edwards & Robert O. Self
  101. Investigating Social Problems: A. Javier Trevino
  102. Tropical Ecosystems and Ecological Concepts, 2nd edition: Patrick Osborne
  103. Read, Reason, Write, 11 Edition: Dorothy Seyler
  104. MGMT (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press) 10th Edition: Chuck Williams
  105. MLA Handbook, 8th edition: The Modern Language Association of America
  106. The Game Design Reader: A Rules of Play Anthology (MIT Press): Katie Salen Tekinba & Eric Zimmerman
  107. American Politics Today, 5th Core edition: William T. Bianco & David T. Canon
  108. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 3rd edition: Clark Spencer Larsen
  109. Awakening: An Introduction to the History of Eastern Thought, 5th Edition: Patrick S. Bresnan
  110. Discovering Computers ©2016 (Shelly Cashman Series): Misty E. Vermaat & Susan L. Sebok & Steven M. Freund & Jennifer T. Campbell & Mark Frydenberg
  111. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance (4th Edition): Jonathan Berk & Peter Demarzo & Jarrad Harford
  112. Human Anatomy & Physiology, 9th/10th edition: Elaine N. Marieb & Katja N. Hoehn
  113. Structural Analysis (9th Edition): Russell C. Hibbeler
  114. Hydrology and Hydraulic Systems, 4th edition: Ram Gupta
  115. Between One and Many: The Art and Science of Public Speaking, 7th edition: Steven R. Brydon & Michael D Scott
  116. Logic: The Essentials: Patrick J. Hurley
  117. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, Volume I, 14th edition: Fred S Kleiner
  118. Paralegal Professional: The Essentials, 5th edition: Thomas F. Goldman & Henry R. Cheeseman
  119. Chemistry: Structure and Properties, 2nd edition: Nivaldo J. Tro
  120. Introduction to Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport (B&B Physical Education),10th Edition: Angela Lumpkin
  121. Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  122. American Government, 2014 Elections and Updates Edition: Karen J. O'Connor & Larry J. Sabato & Alixandra B. Yanus
  123. Nutrition: Science and Applications, 4th Edition: Lori A. Smolin & Mary B. Grosvenor
  124. Experiential Approach to Organization Development, 8th edition: Brown, Donald R
  125. How to Work a Room, 25th Anniversary Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Making Lasting Connections--In Person and Online: Susan RoAne
  126. The Creative Spirit: An Introduction to Theatre, 6th edition: Stephanie Arnold
  127. The Philosopher's Way, 5th edition: John Chaffee
  128. Problem Solving with C++, 9th edition: Walter Savitch
  129. Skills for Success with Office 2016 Volume 1 (Skills for Success for Office 2016 Series): Margo Chaney Adkins & Lisa Hawkins & Catherine Hain & Stephanie Murre-Wolf
  130. The Physics of Everyday Phenomena, Eighth Edition: W. Thomas Griffith & Juliet W. Brosing
  131. Precalculus, 6th edition: Margaret L. Lial & John Hornsby & David I. Schneider & Callie J. Daniels
  132. Starting Out with Programming Logic & Design, Fourth Edition: Tony Gaddis
  133. MKTG11, 11th Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair & Carl McDaniel
  134. The Business Writer's Companion, 8th edition: Gerald J. Alred & Charles T. Brusaw & Walter E. Oliu
  135. America: A Concise History, Volume 2, 6th edition: James Henretta
  136. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: David C. Colander
  137. Psychology, 11th edition: David G. Myers & C. Nathan DeWall
  138. American Education: A History, 5th edition: Jennings L. Wagoner Jr. & Wayne J. Urban
  139. Give Me Liberty! An American History, Seagull 5th edition-Vol 1: Eric Foner
  140. Anthropology: The Human Challenge, 15th edition: William A. Haviland & Harald E. L. Prins & Dana Walrath & Bunny McBride
  141. Lifespan Development, 7th edition: Denise Boyd & Helen Bee
  142. Essentials of Database Management: Jeffrey A. Hoffer & Heikki Topi & Venkataraman Ramesh
  143. GOVT8 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press), 8th edition: Edward Sidlow & Beth Henschen
  144. Horngren's Accounting: The Managerial Chapters (11th Edition): Tracie L. Miller-Nobles & Brenda L. Mattison & Ella Mae Matsumura
  145. Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Cases in Context, 3rd edition: Stephen Orvis & Carol Ann Drogus
  146. Experience Psychology, 3rd Edition: Laura A. King
  147. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd Edition: Dan O’Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  148. Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics, 9th edition: Raymond A. Serway & John W. Jewett
  149. The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology, 5th Edition: Kerry Ferris & Jill Stein
  150. Biological Science, 6th edition: Scott Freeman & Kim Quillin & Lizabeth Allison & Michael Black & Emily Taylor & Greg Podgorski & Jeff Carmichael
  151. Communication: Embracing Difference, 4th edition: Daniel M. Dunn & Lisa J. Goodnight
  152. A Sequence for Academic Writing, 7th edition: Laurence Behrens & Leonard Rosen
  153. Guide to Operating Systems, 5th edition: Greg Tomsho
  154. THiNK, 4th Edition: Judith Boss
  155. Principles of Economics, 8th edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  156. Shelly Cashman Series Discovering Computers & Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2016: A Fundamental Combined Approach: Jennifer T. Campbell
  157. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature Of Matter And Change, Eighth Edition: Martin S. Silberberg, Patricia G. Amateis
  158. Cultural Diversity: A Primer for the Human Services, 5th edition: Jerry V. Diller
  159. Social Psychology, 10th edition: Saul Kassin
  160. Our Sexuality, 13th edition: Robert Crooks & Karla Baur
  161. Professional Nursing Concepts: Competencies for Quality Leadership, 3rd Edition: Finkelman, Anita & Kenner, Carole
  162. Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 3rd Edition: Kyle, Theresa & Ricci, Susan & Carman, Susan
  163. Psychology, 4th edition: Schacter, Daniel L. & Gilbert, Daniel T. & Nock, Matthew K. & Wegner, Daniel M.
  164. 21st Century Astronomy, 5th edition: Laura Kay, Stacy Palen & George Blumenthal
  165. Calculus, 11th edition: Ron Larson
  166. Surface Water-Quality Monitoring: Steven C. Chapra
  167. Pearson's Federal Taxation 2018, Comprehensive: Thomas R. Pope
  168. Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th edition: Thomas L. Wheelen
  169. Bankruptcy Law and Practice: Grace A. Luppino J.D
  170. Family Law for the Paralegal, 3rd edition: Mary E. Wilson
  171. Successful Writing at Work, 10th edition: Philip C. Kolin
  172. Real Communication: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Dan O'Hair & Mary Wiemann & Dorothy Imrich Mullin & Jason Teven
  173. Intimate Relationships, 7th Edition: Rowland Miller
  174. Software Engineering, 10th edition: Ian Sommerville
  175. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics, Structure, and Change, 10th edition: Peter Atkins & Julio de Paula
  176. Educational Research: Competencies for Analysis and Applications (11th Edition): Geoffrey E. Mills & L. R. Gay
  177. At a Glance: Writing Essays and Beyond, 6th edition: Lee Brandon
  178. Delmar’s Standard Textbook of Electricity, 6th edition: Stephen L. Herman
  179. Psychology, 5th edition: Saundra K. Ciccarelli
  180. Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 15th Edition: Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl
  181. The Little Seagull Handbook, 3rd Edition: Richard Bullock, Michal Brody & Francine Weinberg
  182. STAT 2: Building Models for a World of Data: Ann R. Cannon
  183. Interplay-The Process of Interpersonal Communication, 13th edition: Ronald Adler
  184. SELL 5 (New, Engaging Titles From 4LTR Press), 5th edition: Thomas N. Ingram & Raymond (buddy) W. Laforge & Ramon A. Avila & Charles H. Schwepker & Michael R. Williams
  185. Marketing Channels, 8th edition: Bert Rosenbloom
  186. The Changing Earth: Exploring Geology and Evolution, 7th Edition: James S. Monroe & Reed Wicander
  187. Applied Regression Analysis and Generalized Linear Models, 3rd edition: John Fox
  188. Development Economics: Debraj Ray
  189. Organic Chemistry, 9th edition: Leroy G. Wade
  190. A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 9th edition: Jan A. Pechenik
  191. DSP First, 2nd Edition: McClellan, Schafer & Yoder
  192. Epidemiology, 5th Edition: Leon Gordis
  193. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Edition: Dee Unglaub Silverthorn
  194. Essentials of Sociology 12th edition: James M. Henslin
  195. Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 9th edition: Jacqueline Burchum & Laura Rosenthal
  196. Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives, 6th edition: Michael E. Kraft & Scott R. Furlong
  197. Financial Management: Principles and Applications (12th Edition): Sheridan Titman & Arthur J. Keown
  198. Animal Physiology, 4th Edition: Richard W. Hill
  199. Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy (5th Edition): Robert W. Bauman
  200. Understanding Basic Statistics, 7th edition: Charles Henry Brase & Corrinne Pellillo Brase
  201. Organic Chemistry: Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual, 3rd edition: David Klein
  202. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 11th edition: Howard Anton, Irl Bivens & Stephen Davis
  203. An Introduction to Student–Involved Assessment FOR Learning, 7th edition: Jan Chappuis & Rick Stiggins
  204. The Bedford Researcher with 2016 MLA Update, 5th edition: Mike Palmquist
  205. Roots of the Western Tradition: A Short History of the Ancient World, 8th edition: Guy Rogers & C. Warren Hollister
  206. Contemporary Logistics, 12th edition: Paul R. Murphy & A. Michael Knemeyer
  207. Personal Finance, 13th edition: E. Thomas Garman
  208. C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, 8th Edition: D. S. Malik
  209. Information Systems Today: Managing in the Digital World, 7th edition: Joseph Valacich & Christoph Schneider
  210. New Products Management, 11th Edition: Merle Crawford & Anthony Di Benedetto
  211. A World of Ideas, 10th Edition: Lee A. Jacobus
  212. Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control: Terry L.M. Bartelt
  213. We the People: An Introduction to American Politics 11th Essentials edition: Benjamin Ginsberg, et al.
  214. Wardlaw's Contemporary Nutrition, 10th edition: Anne Smith & Angela Collene
  215. Technical Communication, 14th Edition: John M. Lannon
  216. Electronics Fundamentals: A Systems Approach: Thomas L. Floyd & David M. Buchla
  217. Discrete-Event System Simulation, 5th edition: Jerry Banks & John S. Carson & Barry L. Nelson & David M. Nicol
  218. Engaging Social Welfare: An Introduction to Policy Analysis: Mark J. Stern
  219. Social Welfare Policy and Advocacy: Advancing Social Justice through 8 Policy Sectors: Bruce S. Jansson
  220. Foundations of Astronomy, 12th edition: Michael A. Seeds & Dana Backman
  221. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: Volume: 1 (Concise Edition): Elizabeth Pollard & Clifford Rosenberg & Robert Tignor
  222. The Art of Public Speaking, 12th Edition: Stephen E. Lucas
  223. Genetic Essentials: Concepts and Conncections, 3rd edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  224. Prosthodontic Treatment for Edentulous Patients: Complete Dentures and Implant-Supported Prostheses, 13th edition: George A. Zarb & John Hobkirk & Steven Eckert & Rhonda Jacob
  225. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 9th edition: Robert Jurmain & Lynn Kilgore & Wenda Trevathan
  226. The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings and Handbook with 2016 MLA Update, 4th Edition: Richard Bullock, Maureen Daly Goggin & Francine Weinberg
  227. Biochemistry: Concepts and Connections: Dean R. Appling & Spencer J. Anthony-Cahill
  228. The Basic Practice of Statistics, 7th edition: David S. Moore & William I. Notz & Michael A. Fligner
  229. Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination, 2nd edition: GEORGE YOUNG and William Hopwood
  230. Macroeconomics, 4th edition: Charles I. Jones
  231. Web Development and Design Foundations with HTML5, 8th edition: Terry Ann Felke-Morris, Ed.D
  232. Invitation to Public Speaking - National Geographic Edition, 5th Edition: Cindy L. Griffin
  233. Marketing: the Core, 6th edition: Roger A. Kerin, Steven W. Hartley
  234. Development: Infancy Through Adolescence: Laurence Steinberg and Deborah Lowe Vandell
  235. Sports Economics: Roger D. Blair
  236. Quick & Easy Medical Terminology, 8th edition: Peggy C. Leonard
  237. Legal Research and Writing for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 8th edition: Deborah E. Bouchoux
  238. Evidence for Paralegals (Aspen College Series), 5th edition: Joelyn D. Marlowe
  239. Criminal Law, 12th edition: Joel Samaha
  240. Natural Resource Economics: An Introduction, 3rd edition: Barry C. Field
  241. Learning with LabVIEW, 1st Edition: Robert H. Bishop
  242. Methods in Behavioral Research, 12th edition: Paul C. Cozby & Scott C. Bates
  243. Contemporary Human Behavior Theory: A Critical Perspective for Social Work , 3rd edition: Susan P. Robbins
  244. Managerial Accounting for Managers, 4th edition: Eric Noreen
  245. Basic Marketing Research: Using Microsoft Excel Data Analysis, 3rd Edition: Alvin Burns & Ronald Bush
  246. Dosage Calculations Made Incredibly Easy! (Incredibly Easy! Series®), 5th edition: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  247. Fundamentals of Financial Management, 14th edition: Eugene F. Brigham & Joel F. Houston
  248. Global Issues: Politics, Economics, and Culture, 5th edition: Richard J. Payne
  249. FOCUS on Community College Success, 4th edition: Constance Staley
  250. The American Promise, Value Edition, Volume 2, 7th edition: James L. Roark & Michael P. Johnson & Patricia Cline Cohen & Sarah Stage & Susan M. Hartmann
  251. The Economics of Money, Banking, and Financial Markets, 11th Edition: Frederic S. Mishkin
  252. Management, 14th edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & Joseph J. Martocchio & Lori K. Long
  253. Organizational Behavior, 17th edition: Stephen P. Robbins
  254. Race and Ethnicity: The United States and the World (2nd Edition): Scupin, Raymond, Ph.D
  255. Entrepreneurial Small Business, 5th edition: Jerome A. Katz & Richard P. Green II
  256. Teaching Discipline-Specific Literacies in Grades 6-12: Preparing Students for College, Career, and Workforce Demands: Vicky I. Zygouris-Coe
  257. Human Development A Cultural Approach (2nd Edition): Jeffrey J. Arnett
  258. Listening to Music, 8th edition: Craig Wright
  259. Work in the 21st Century, 5th edition: Frank J. Landy
  260. Principles of Microeconomics, 8th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  261. Strategic Management: Text and Cases (Irwin Management), 8th Edition: Gregory G Dess Dr. and Gerry McNamara
  262. Essentials of Sociology, 2nd edition: George Ritzer
  263. Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings, 7th Edition: John Perry & Michael Bratman
  264. Real Estate Development - 5th Edition: Principles and Process: Mike E. Miles & Laurence M. Netherton & Adrienne Schmitz
  265. Real Estate Finance & and Investments, 15th edition: William Brueggeman
  266. A First Course in Differential Equations with Modeling Applications, 11th edition: Dennis G. Zill
  267. The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, 10th edition: James W. Zubrick
  268. Administration of Wills, Trusts and Estates, 5th edition: Gordon Brown & Scott Myers
  269. Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years (Early Childhood Education Series), Expanded 3rd Edition: Judy Harris Helm & Lilian G. Katz
  270. Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 8th Edition: Halliday & Resnick & Walker
  271. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 2nd Edition: Weygandt & Kimmel & Kieso
  272. College Algebra, 6th edition: Mark Dugopolski
  273. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture: Volume Two, Brif 4th Edition: Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  274. Society: The Basics, 14th Edition: John J Macionis
  275. M: Marketing, 5th Edition: Dhruv Grewal, Michael Levy
  276. Mass Media and American Politics, 10th edition: Doris A. Graber & Johanna L. Dunaway
  277. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  278. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 E-Book: 5 Books in 1 (Ferri's Medical Solutions): Fred F. Ferri
  279. Organic Chemistry, 5th Edition: Janice Gorzynski Smith
  280. COMM4 (New, Engaging Titles from 4LTR Press): Kathleen S. Verderber, Deanna D. Sellnow & Rudolph F. Verderber
  281. The Theatre Experience, 13th edition: Edwin Wilson
  282. Mcknight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 12th edition: Darrel Hess & Dennis Tasa
  283. Intermediate Algebra, 12th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger
  284. Strategic Management Concept, 3rd Edition: Frank Rothaermel
  285. Moral Issues in Business, 13th edition: William H. Shaw
  286. Marketing 2016, 18th edition: William M. Pride & O. C. Ferrell
  287. Experiencing the World's Religions: Tradition, Challenge, and Change, 6th Edition: Michael Molloy
  288. Fundamentals of Cost Accounting, 5th edition: William N. Lanen, Shannon W. Anderson, Michael W. Maher
  289. Motivational Interviewing in Health Care: Helping Patients Change Behavior (Applications of Motivational Interviewing): Stephen Rollnick & William R. Miller & Christopher C. Butler
  290. Community and Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 1st edition: Gail A. Harkness & Rosanna DeMarco
  291. Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations (Community/Public Health Nursing: Promoting the Health of Populations), 6th Edition: Mary A. Nies & Melanie McEwen
  292. Worlds Together, Worlds Apart, 4th Edition, Volume One: Robert Tignor
  293. Microeconomics: Theory & Applications, 12th edition: Edgar K. Browning
  294. CCNA Routing and Switching ICND2 200-105 Official Cert Guide, Academic Edition: Wendell Odom
  295. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 11th edition: Ross & Westerfield & Jordan
  296. Daniels and Worthingham's Muscle Testing: Techniques of Manual Examination and Performance Testing (Daniels & Worthington's Muscle Testing (Hislop)), 9th Edition: Helen Hislop & Dale Avers & Marybeth Brown
  297. Worlds Together Worlds Apart, 4th Edition , Volume Two: Robert Tignor & Jeremy Adelman
  298. Human Relations for Career and Personal Success, Concepts, Applications, and Skills, 11th edition: Andrew J. DuBrin
  299. The Bedford Guide for Writing Tutors, 6th edition: Leigh Ryan & Lisa Zimmerelli
  300. Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 16th edition: Joel Feinberg & Russ Shafer-Landau
  301. Environment and You, The (2nd Edition): Norm Christensen & Lissa Leege
  302. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik, 6th edition: Jamie Rankin & Larry Wells
  303. Essentials of Marketing: A Marketing Strategy Planning Approach, 14th edition: William D. Perreault & Jr. & Joseph P. Cannon & E. Jerome McCarthy
  304. Financial & Managerial Accounting, 17th Edition: Jan R. Williams
  305. Statistics, Data Analysis, and Decision Modeling (5th Edition): James R. Evans
  306. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, 8th edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  307. Big Ideas of Early Mathematics: What Teachers of Young Children Need to Know: The Early Math Collaborative- E
  308. Bailey's Research for the Health Professional, 3rd edition: Diana Bailey & Angela Hissong
  309. Systems Analysis and Design in a Changing World, 7th edition: John W. Satzinger, Robert B. Jackson & Stephen D. Burd
  310. Survey of Operating Systems, 5th edition: Jane Holcombe
  311. Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents, 7th edition: Jane Case-Smith & Jane Clifford O'Brien
  312. McGraw Hill Taxation of Business Entities, 2018 Edition: SPILKER & AYERS & BARRICK & OUTSLAY & ROBINSON & WEAVER & WORSHAM
  313. Accounting Controls Guidebook: Third Edition: A Practical Guide: Steven Bragg
  314. The African-American Odyssey: Volume 2 (6th Edition): Darlene Clark Hine
  315. Exploring Psychology in Modules, 10th edition: David Myers & Nathan Dewall
  316. The Human Body in Health and Illness, 5th edition: Barbara Herlihy
  317. CPHQ Exam Secrets Study Guide: CPHQ Test Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  318. CPHQ Exam Practice Questions (First Set): CPHQ Practice Tests & Review for the Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality Exam: CPHQ Exam Secrets Test Prep Team
  319. Philosophy: A Text with Readings, 13th edition: Manuel Velasquez
  320. Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics: Using Microsoft Excel 2016, 4th Edition: Neil J. Salkind
  321. Tort Law: Text and Materials, 5th edition: Mark Lunney & Ken Oliphant
  322. Graphic Design School: The Principles and Practice of Graphic Design, 5th edition: David Dabner & Sandra Stewart & Eric Zempol
  323. Microbe, 2nd edition: Michele Swanson, Gemma Reguera, Moselio Schaechter & Frederick Neidhardt
  324. An Introduction to Modern Welfare Economics: Per-Olov Johansson
  325. Human Sexuality, 4th Edition: Roger R. Hock
  326. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, 6th Edition: Lisa J. McIntyre
  327. THINK Psychology, Second Canadian Edition: Abigail A. Baird & Anjanie McCarthy
  328. General Medical Conditions in the Athlete, 2nd edition: Micki Cuppett & Katie Walsh
  329. Laboratory Techniques in Organic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Jerry R. Mohrig & David Alberg & Gretchen Hofmeister & Christine Hammond
  330. C++ Programming: Program Design Including Data Structures, 8th edition: D. S. Malik
  331. Essentials of Meteorology: An Invitation to the Atmosphere, 7th edition: C. Donald Ahrens
  332. St. Martin's Guide to Writing Short Edition with 2016 MLA Update, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper
  333. Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology, 12th edition: Elaine N. Marieb, Suzanne M. Keller
  334. Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 7th Edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  335. Manual of Structural Kinesiology, 19th Edition: R.T. Floyd
  336. California: The Politics of Diversity, 8th edition: David G. Lawrence
  337. American Government and Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Lynne E. Ford
  338. Business Essentials (11th Edition): Ronald J. Ebert & Ricky W. Griffin
  339. Music: An Appreciation, Brief Edition (B&B Music), 9th Edition: Roger Kamien
  340. Graphic Design Solutions, 5th edition: Robin Landa
  341. Classics of Western Philosophy (Eighth Edition): Steven M. Cahn
  342. International Business, 1st Edition: J. Michael Geringer, Jeanne M. McNett, Michael S. Minor, Donald A. Ball
  343. Texas Politics Today: 2017-2018 Edition, 18th edition: Mark Jones
  344. The Film Experience: An Introduction, 4th Edition: Timothy Corrigan & Patricia White
  345. Adobe® Dreamweaver® Creative Cloud™: Comprehensive: Corinne L. Hoisington & Jessica L. Minnick
  346. Web Design: Introductory (Shelly Cashman), 6th Edition: Jennifer T. Campbell
submitted by jaydenblochhh to levski [link] [comments]


2019.03.30 00:41 RIPGrantland [OC] What would be the 3 Man Wrestling Stable for every NBA Team

Golden State Warriors - Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green
They are the New Day of the bunch. They have won multiple titles together, pulled off records together, and are all eccentric personalities. Draymond Green is a meaner Big E Langston, though just as funny on the mic. Nobody wants the three to break up, even knowing the fact they would all find success individually. Big E is more primed for a solo run than Draymond.
Denver Nuggets - Nikola Jokic, Mason Plumlee, Will Barton (Isaiah Thomas manager)
Denver has two of the best playmaking big men in the entire league. It would be dumb not to pair these two seven foot white boys with Will the Thrill Barton. You can either go double big men or have versatility with Barton and a big man. If Barton were to go down, Isaiah Thomas at 5'9 to counterbalance the two seven footers would be amazing.
Houston Rockets - James Harden, Gerald Green, Austin Rivers
Originally the team was supposed to be Harden flanked by enforcers Clint Capela and PJ Tucker. Instead, we went in a different direction. Harden is a connoisseur of strip clubs so his faction will be focused on cash money. Gerald Green and Austin Rivers embody the irrational confidence of their team and are there to take the pin for Harden when need be.
Portland Trailblazers - Damian Lillard, CJ Mccollum, Evan Turner
Easily the most fun team on the mic. Dame can create the song for their entrance, CJ can run their social media, and ET would be the funniest person on the mic in the league. Evan Turner has a master list of amazing quotes, imagine how many more he would have if he was a star? Would this team win a lot of matches? No. However, they would be over as hell and sell tons of merch. I feel bad for Enes Kanter who wants a career in the WWE. At least he is smashing Dana Brooke.
Los Angeles Clippers - Patrick Beverley, Montrezl Harrell, Lou Williams
I have a running theory that Patrick Beverley and Montrezl Harrell fist fight before games to get hyped up. This tag team reminds me of the Usos. Consistently underrated guys who can get dirty and do whatever it takes to win. I think this trio would actually be more intimidating as wrestlers than NBA players.
Utah Jazz - Rudy Gobert, Donovan Mitchell, Jae Crowder
Mitchell is the obvious breakout solo star of this faction. Mitchell has long arms, agility, has aerial explosiveness and is charismatic as hell. I can imagine him pulling off some sick tag team moves with Gobert where they make full use of Gobert's 9'10 standing vertical. Jae Crowder is there to take pins.
Oklahoma City Thunder - Russell Westbrook, Dennis Schroder, Steven Adams
Paul George is the best player on the Thunder and is one of the five best players in the NBA this season. However, for the Thunder wrestling faction, you need the swagger and irrational confidence of Westbrook and Schroder. Schroder has crazy hair-dos and drives golden cars without anyone asking, put him in a wrestling ring and he'll pull off some magic. Steven Adams as a Dothraki warrior is the heavy of the faction for obvious reasons.
San Antonio Spurs - DeMar DeRozan, Rudy Gay, Marco Belinelli
We are going to call this trio the forgotten sons. The whole storyline is built around DeMar DeRozan who feels sad and lost after being dumped by Toronto. Unfortunately, the Spurs are the least charismatic team in the league and make for a poor wrestling faction.
Sacramento Kings - De'Aaron Fox, Buddy Hield, Bogdan Bogdanovic
One of my favorite trios to watch on an NBA court together. Would they be good in a ring together? Hield and Bogi I'm not sure, however, it's a guarantee Fox will be pulling out some Dragon Ball Z type shit in the ring.
Los Angeles Lakers - LeBron James, Kyle Kuzma, Lonzo Ball
Lonzo and Kuzma will be swagged out in King entire and then be there to take the pin for him when he refused to tag back in.
Minnesota Timberwolves - Karl Anthony-Towns, Derrick Rose, Andrew Wiggins
This will be a fun team. KAT as the young superstar with the potential to become a solo champion. Rose at the former MVP who has now found glory after many injuries to become a rocking tag team competitor. And Andrew Wiggins to be the third who takes the pins. New Orleans Pelicans - Anthony Davis, Kenrich Williams, Frank Jackson You sell tickets by putting Davis's name on the card, then put the other two in the match and get squashed in under a minute.
Memphis Grizzlies - Mike Conley, Jaren Jackson, Chandler Parsons
Three guys who all seem nice but don't make sense together. Kinda reminds me of Rusev-Nakamura currently or Ziggler and Big E from the past. Conley at this point is a Jeff Hardy, simply a gatekeeper ready to take some pins and maybe get a two-week stint with the US title.
Dallas Mavericks - Luka Doncic, Maxi Kleber, Dwight Powell (Dirk as manager)
You put Luka Doncic with the two players on the Mavericks who dunk. You're gonna have a fun time watching them take pins and knowing Luka is gonna be main eventing Wrestlemania one day.
Phoenix Suns - Devin Booker, Dragan Bender, Troy Daniels Devin Booker is going to be like Jason Jordan before he found Chad Gable. Lost with an endless stream of bad tag team partners who will keep him from achieving success.
Milwaukee Bucks - Giannis Antetokoumpo, Khris Middleton, Eric Bledsoe
Three long and athletic freaks together on one them. Phew, this team would rock the house down. Your only fear is an erratic Eric Bledsoe pulls a heel turn at a random moment.
Toronto Raptors - Kyle Lowry, Kawhi Leonard, Pascal Siakam
Could you imagine taking a spear from Pascal Siakam running at you? Could you imagine Kawhi Leonard reaching at you from half a ring away and grabbing you with his massive hand just to choke slam you? Imagine Kyle Lowry being a general menace to your day? This Raptors faction is the biggest threat to the Bucks in the East.
Philadelphia 76ers - Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, Jimmy Butler
I kept going back and forth between whether or not to put Jimmy Butler in the trio or to put TJ McConnell in. As scrappy and enjoyable TJ is, I cannot leave Butler of this list. Jimmy Butler is the veteran leader of this faction and will 100% turn heel on his boys for his own ego. Bobi, Tobi, and Mike Scott not being a faction also sadden me greatly.
Indiana Pacers - Bojan Bogdanovic, Myles Turner, and Domantas Sabonis
This tag team would be a carbon copy of the Denver tag team except the two big men are great athletes. Bogdanovic fills in for an injured Victor Oladipo, just like in real life.
Boston Celtics - Kyrie Irving, Jayson Tatum, Marcus Smart
I believe Kryie will wrestle as Uncle Drew. The other two will follow suit and create their own characters with make-up and prosthetics. Legendary in small doses, awfully disappointing as a full feature.
Detroit Pistons - Blake Griffin, Andre Drummond, Reggie Jackson
Every time Blake Griffin goes for a big flip or takes a massive bump, fans will live in terror of him tearing something and we lose Blake for 4–8 months. Andre Drummond as the former all-star who is now resided into tag team work, and a disappointing Reggie Jackson who is here to take the pins in tag team action.
Brooklyn Nets - D'Angelo Russell, Spence Dinwiddie, Ed Davis
Russell and Dinwiddie have perfect wrestler names. The duo has run the fast-paced Nets offense at a high level this season and might just get them to the playoffs. Jarrett Allen seems like the pick for this team as the big guy. That's a trap. Allen is fun and athletic, but Davis can get super physical and can still accomplish big feats of athleticism. Imagine Boss Davis suplexing you hard into the mat while Dinwiddie drops an elbow into you from the top rope.
Orlando Magic - Jonathan Isaac, Aaron Gordon, Terrence Ross
This faction will be three babyfaces built around the religious figure and Jesus lover Jonathan Isaac. The uber-athleticism of this trio will make them must-watch television. There is some Hardy Boys type fear where they will try a crazy flip or move as a finisher, only to get side-stepped or take knees to the ribs.
Charlotte Hornets - Kemba Walker, Cody Zeller, Malik Monk
Kemba will be happy when Cody Zeller is healthy. unfortunately, he will take months off at a time due to injury. When Zeller isn't healthy, he'll be sad watching Monk go from hitting one great to botching another.
Washington Wizards - Bradley Beal, Thomas Bryant, Dwight Howard
I feel everyone forgot Dwight Howard is on the Wizards roster. We are putting him in this trio to sell tickets. People hate Dwight Howard so he can work as a heel. Eh, nevermind. Even with a superstar like Bradley Beal, it's difficult to find any joy in the Wizards. Did anyone watch the game where Thomas Bryant mauled Luc Mbah A Moute's arm during a late regular season game against the Rockets in 2018? He drastically changed the NBA season and Luc's career. I wonder what he would do in a wrestling ring.
Atlanta Hawks - Trae Young, John Collins, Kevin Huerter
The funniest team on the card. Too young to know what they are doing together, yet will bring joy to our hearts as they figure it out.
Chicago Bulls - Zach LaVine, Otto Porter, Lauri Markannen
All talented and young, except disappointing us by their lack of cohesion. Essentially the Nega Hawks.
Cleveland Cavaliers - Kevin Love, Collin Sexton, Cedi Osman
If Kevin Love gets injured then they get written off TV completely.
New York Knicks - Mitchell Robinson, Emmanuel Mudiay, Mario Hezonja
They are spending most of their time at the NXT performance center.
Edit:
I left off the Miami Heat. They would obviously be Bam Adebayo, Dwyane Wade, and Dion Waiters. Big Bam would be the star.
submitted by RIPGrantland to nba [link] [comments]


2019.02.21 14:58 AndrewNaranja Countdown to Kickoff 2019: Houston Dynamo

The MIGHTY Houston Dynamo!
We crush your dreams and take your Hondurans since 2005.
BBVA Compass Stadium is our home and we remember The Rob.
We won back-to-back MLS Cups in 2006 and 2007 and we just added an Open Cup.
Gabriel Brener, Ben Guill, and Jake Silverstein are our owners. Oscar De La Hoya is a scrub.
John Walker took out Chris Canetti in a fist fight.
Matt Jordan is an FM god.
Wilmer Cabrera keeps the dream going.
Diesel is the best mascot in the league.
Primary kit not released yet, but the current secondary kit is still lit.
LET’S GET IT
2018 Review:
Houston had a disappointing regular season following their first Conference Final appearance in five years, earning a 10W-8D-16L record while having to deal with key losses due to injuries, inconsistent defensive performances, tied the team’s all-time goals allowed record in league play at 58, shameful road form (losing 10 out of the 17 matches away from home), and lack of depth in certain areas that set the team to miss playoffs for the first time in the Cabrera Era as they would finish ninth place in the Western Conference.
But despite these setbacks, the team earned some significant achievements in 2018. Mauro Manotas had a career year by scoring 25 goals in all competitions, winning the 2018 U.S. Open Cup Golden Boot, and breaking all of the club’s single-season scoring records in the process. And aside from individual performances, the team broke its own all-time single-season MLS scoring record with 58 goals, won their first-ever Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, and qualified to the 2019 Concacaf Champions League.
I am a glass-half-full kind of guy.
2018-19 Offseason:
Off the field, the club made lots of moves behind the scenes. With Chris Canetti leaving the organization to become the President of the Houston World Cup Bid Committee, John Walker would take over his position as Chief Business Officer with a 30-year track record in the sports industry. New sponsors would also be announced ahead of the 2019 regular season. The club reached an agreement with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for a unique collaboration to end cancer, display their message on every jersey, and establish a connection through community service and educational events. Partnerships with TriEagle Energy and Turkish Airlines were also announced.
On the field, the Dynamo would have to restructure the team in order to address a dismal year defensively and holes in the depth chart, they would also make some pretty intriguing signings as well as annual Beasley-Boogaloo.
Departures:
• DF Dylan Remick: a talented full back that was important for the Dynamo in 2017, Remick suffered a concussion during the 2018 preseason that would set him back and not see any more playing time with the first team aside from RGVFC. The defender would later on announce his retirement from the game.
• DF Philippe Senderos: he might be old, but he held significant importance for the team. Brought in pretty late in 2017, the former Arsenal center back made 10 appearances and scored four goals in MLS in total for the club. He also played in every single 2018 U.S. Open Cup match and scored the winning penalty in the semifinal against LAFC to advance to the final. His contract with the Dynamo expired at the end of 2018.
• DF Adolfo Machado: one of the most important pieces for the Dynamo at one point, but his form dropped drastically. Starting nearly every match in MLS play in 2017, Machado missed significant time with the club due to his 2018 FIFA World Cup call-up with Panama and with a noticeable drop in performance this past year. Houston would decline his option later on.
• DF Andrew Wenger: the former top overall pick in the 2012 MLS SuperDraft recorded 76 appearances, along with ten goals and six assists in league play for the Dynamo since 2016. Wenger would become a reliable piece as a full back instead of his primary position on midfield for the most part. His contract expired at the end of 2018 and later on announced his retirement.
Other players out: DF Conor Donovan (option declined), DF Leonardo (option declined), DF Jared Watts (option declined), FW Mac Steeves (option declined), MF Arturo Alvarez (contract expired), MF Luis Gil (loan expired), MF Eric Alexander (traded), and GK Chris Seitz (traded).
Arrivals:
• DF Erik McCue (Homegrown): the first signing of the offseason would be the club’s tenth Homegrown Player. At 17 years of age and a dual-national from Onsala, Sweden, the defender looks like he could be a good deal for the Dynamo considering his physical form, already practiced with the first team before signing a contract, and has the attention of Swedish U-19s.
• DF Chris Duvall: the 29-year-old MLS veteran has made 101 league appearances and looks like he is going to be a backup in the full back position. I am pretty skeptical for this one, but we shall see how he plays out for Cabrera.
• MF Thomas McNamara: an MLS cult legend, TommyMac reunites with Wilmer Cabrera after their days with Chivas USA and look to blow the league out of the water in 2019. Spending his last four years at New York City FC, McNamara looks like he is going to be a good midfield option off the bench. Looking forward to his hat-tricks every week.
• MF Matias Vera (International): looks like Juan David Cabezas got his CDM partner and he will be competing with Darwin Ceren for the starting spot. The 23-year-old Argentinian can make an impact defensively as he has traits resembling Cabezas (you know, probably the most important player in the team) solely based on the recent scrimmages in Tucson. I will have to see more of this when the real matches start.
• DF Aljaz Struna (International): arguably the most important out of the new bunch. “Kiki” is going to take over a position that has been highly inconsistent with the Houston Dynamo over the past few seasons (freshly coming out of the club’s MLS all-time record of goals conceded in a season as stated above). And based on what I have seen from the scrimmages in Tucson, it is going to depend on his mental game as well as his other center back pair (I am down for my boi Fuenmayor).
• MF Marlon Hairston: I am sticking with Struna being my most important signing of the offseason, but Marlon Hairston can prove me wrong. He had some pretty convincing performances in Tucson and we may see him start a few matches now and then, heck, even see more minutes than TommyMac. He is a very technical player that can easily trigger Houston’s world famous counter-attack off the midfield. I want to see more Hairston.
• Maynor Figueroa: Veteran presence to feed Honduras Dynamo. Love it!
2019 MLS SuperDraft selections: DF Sam Junqua, DF Andrew Samuels, MF Brad Dunwell.
Returning players:
• Goalkeepers: Tyler Deric (Homegrown), Michael Nelson, Joe Willis.
• Defenders: DaMarcus Beasley, AJ DeLaGarza, Alejandro Fuenmayor (International), Kevin Garcia, Adam Lundqvist (International).
• Midfielders: Eric Bird, Juan David Cabezas, Darwin Ceren, Oscar Boniek Garcia, Tomas Martinez (DP), Jose “Memo” Rodriguez (Homegrown).
• Forwards: Alberth Elis (DP, International), Mauro Manotas, Ronaldo Peña (International), Romell Quioto.
2019 Preview:
We are looking at a 4-2-1-3 (technically a 4-3-3) to start things off.
Joe Willis will keep the starting role since he is currently miles ahead of Tyler Deric in terms of form.
I am expecting DaMarcus Beasley, Aljaz Struna, Alejandro Fuenmayor, and AJ DeLaGarza to compose the first back line of the year, which brings a balance of experience and with Cabezas and Vera assisting the back line, they can also stabilize midfield and help build up the play going forward with the help of Tomas Martinez (or potentially Hairston).
Quioto, Manotas, and Elis are going to be involved in a boatload of goals, but the trident cannot work properly without a midfield that is able to pressure the opposing defense and connect plays.
My prediction is that Houston is going to clinch a spot for the 2019 MLS Cup Playoffs, they will improve defensively which is what is going to get them better results in league play. However, I cannot say the same for the Open Cup and the Concacaf Champions League. The latter is going to depend on the squad rotation and consistent form.
Taking part in three different competitions this year, Houston Dynamo are potentially heading to their busiest season in six years and with lots to prove.
submitted by AndrewNaranja to MLS [link] [comments]


2019.02.11 17:15 JamTheGod (The Athletic) If anyone wants a good read this Monday. Talks about our buyout deadline targets, House situation and our Tax bill scenario.

Nearly​ 24​ hours​ after the​ NBA’s​ trade deadline​ had passed,​ an assemblage of media gathered at​ Houston’s​ Toyota Center with​ practice inching closer.
On​​ the far end of the court, two men could be seen engaging in brief pleasantries. One was Troy Payne, an Adidas ambassador and close friend/business partner of James Harden. The other was Rockets general manager Daryl Morey, here for a rare practice appearance.
As he started his gait to reporters, his notable change in appearance was made even more clear. The usually clean-cut Morey now brandished a full beard. Not on par with Harden’s, but a beard nonetheless.
He explained that it came to fruition in the thick of Harden’s now 29-game streak of scoring 30 points or more, and he doesn’t plan on cutting it until it ends. “It’s the unguardable tour,” Morey joked.
His slightly disheveled hair resembled someone who hadn’t had a good night’s rest in a while, and as one team executive put it, “I haven’t slept in five days.” The trade deadline is no laughing matter.
Morey explained that the deadline was really about Iman Shumpert, who should see plenty of minutes as his versatility speaks volumes to what the Rockets need. Consider the following sequence.
And this, a few seconds later:
“[We were] also able to create flexibility for buyouts this year, to add players down the stretch and into the future as well,” Morey explained. “It’s going to make it a lot easier to add players down the road.”
The keyword here is flexibility, both roster-wise and financially. Looking at the current list, there are only 12 players under contract, excluding their two-way guys, Vincent Edwards and Danuel House. Per CBA rules, Houston will need to fill two spots within the next two weeks so that at least 14 players are being paid NBA salaries. It’s somewhat on the same timeline as the March 1 deadline, which is the last day a player can be signed to be considered playoff-eligible. So within the next three weeks, give or take, the final form of Houston’s roster will take shape.
From a financial side, the Rockets achieved their goal of avoiding the luxury tax penalties. At the beginning of the season, they faced a looming $14.6 million tax bill. Many of their offseason acquisitions are gone, after James Ennis, Marquese Chriss and Brandon Knight were moved by the deadline. That, combined with the previous trades of Carmelo Anthony and Michael Carter-Williams, put Houston around $637,000 below the tax threshold. (The Athletic’s Danny Leroux did a recent deep dive into Houston’s cap situation, luxury and repeater tax outlook.)
With the future clearer, the Rockets can now focus on a playoff push. After a tough Saturday night loss to the Thunder, whom they led by 26 points, Houston closed out the weekend in fifth place in the West at 32-23. I had Houston finishing second this season and I still say that is possible, or at least third. Once Clint Capela returns to the fold and their roster shapes out, they should have enough oomph to get there, but as it stands, a second-round matchup with Golden State is a possibility.
In a perfect world, they would avoid the Warriors until another Western Conference Finals, but there’s no running from them, whatever round you should happen to meet them. “We feel like after a Golden State, we can compete with those teams,” Morey said. “We feel like with all these moves, we’ll be positioned to be their toughest opponent.”
The next set of moves involves the buyout market, which figures to be quite rich, with one exec saying the list of viable contributors could be as many as 30. “Every player playing for every team that won’t make the playoffs and doesn’t have guaranteed money might get bought out,” another executive put it.
So what are the Rockets looking for, and is Houston really a more attractive destination than other teams because of the free-flowing, all-systems-go basketball Coach Mike D’Antoni employs?
“We’re having multiple conversations,” said Morey. “We have a couple players at the top of the list. Until they clear waivers, it’s not something we can talk about, but we think it’s gonna be good for us.”
Markieff Morris ticks the obvious box here, for multiple reasons. The guy can ball. A 6-foot-10 forward with range could be used in any Rockets lineup. If D’Antoni wants to get really weird with it and go small ball, Morris as a stretch 5 could be deadly. Houston likes him, league sources say.
He’s currently dealing with a neck injury, which might scare some away, but Morris told the Washington Post he expects to be back right after the All-Star break.
There are obvious ties here. The Morris twins share a close relationship with Harden and make the yearly pilgrimage to Houston for his annual charity weekend festivities. Harden was reportedly a bit bummed out when Marcus was traded during his first season as a Rocket. It also wouldn’t be the first time Markieff has tried to come to Houston.
Avery Bradley is another player to monitor; it’s unclear whether Memphis will buy him out. He struggled as a Clipper, but I would expect contenders to line up if he becomes available. Bradley is owed $12 million this season, but is only due for a partial guarantee of $2 million for 2019-20. He’s another guard with a knack for defense, and a team can never have enough of that.
Any situation involving DeAndre Jordan would be difficult, given the recent chatter of his friendship with soon-to-be free agent Kevin Durant — and Jordan’s mentoring of New York Knicks rookie Mitchell Robinson.
Another route would be to bring back fan favorite Danuel House. He and his camp are staying positive and confident that a deal can come to fruition before March 1. “Danuel’s somebody that obviously is with the Vipers and someone we think would be good to work something out with,” Morey said. “But we have to work out a contract with him.”
The million-dollar question is can Houston make any of these moves and still remain under the tax? The answer is yes, but it takes a bit of #NewMath. Shout out to Jeff Siegel.
Scenario 1
This would be the best route to saving money and bringing Morris in as early as possible. Houston could sign two 10-days on Feb. 20, then sign Morris on March 4 to a rest-of-season contract. They could then sign another 10-day two weeks after the first two expired — on March 14 — then two weeks after that expires, sign House to a rest-of-season contract. That leaves them precisely $1,996 below the tax, even if Capela hits all three of his bonuses (totaling $2 million), and gives them an ample amount of time for Morris to mesh before the playoffs.
Scenario 2
Alternatively, Morey could simply wait two weeks, sign two 10-days, then wait two more weeks, sign two more 10-days, then sign Morris and House two weeks after that (on April 5) for the rest of the season, which is only six days at that point. This would insulate them fully, even if Capela hits his bonuses*, the closest they could get to the tax is $190,000 below it. This route is tricky because it presumes Markieff would be willing to wait that long before signing with a team, but the Rockets would still be in the green here.
*The above two scenarios are done so, given the assumption that Clint Capela reaches his incentives and receives his bonuses. He needs to reach 2,000 minutes to be eligible, and if he’s back by the end of the All-Star break, averaging 23 minutes a game for the last 25 games should easily get him there. He can potentially earn $1 million for making the conference finals and playing 2,000 reg season minutes, $500,000 for a 30 percent Def Reb Rate in the regular season, and $500,000 for 150 made free throws in the regular season, 65 percent FT shooting in the regular season.
submitted by JamTheGod to rockets [link] [comments]


Marques Houston@ Favorite Girl - YouTube Naked - YouTube Say What!: Raz-B (formerly of B2K) & Ray J to Partner Up?! Raz B goes off on marques Houston on the phone about Omarion! Marques Houston show off his beard (girlfriend) which is Chris Strokes play daughter The Internet Reacts To Marques Houston New Teenage ... Explosion (Explicit), Marques Houston [HD] - YouTube Hotel Bel-Air Wedding // Bobbi & Marcus - YouTube

Partners - University of Houston

  1. Marques [email protected] Favorite Girl - YouTube
  2. Naked - YouTube
  3. Say What!: Raz-B (formerly of B2K) & Ray J to Partner Up?!
  4. Raz B goes off on marques Houston on the phone about Omarion!
  5. Marques Houston show off his beard (girlfriend) which is Chris Strokes play daughter
  6. The Internet Reacts To Marques Houston New Teenage ...
  7. Explosion (Explicit), Marques Houston [HD] - YouTube
  8. Hotel Bel-Air Wedding // Bobbi & Marcus - YouTube

Former B2K star, Raz-B speaks to Ray J about possibly partnering up together business-wise, Marques Houston and more. Check it out and let us know what you think. Don't forget to subscribe to our ... Marques Houston on Getting Discovered by Chris Stokes at Talent Show, Platinum Album at 12 (Part 1) - Duration: 11:03. djvlad 186,474 views. 11:03. Marques Houston recently became a Jehovah Witness and also locked down a young lady that could be his daughter’s age. Fans took to Instagram with kind words ... Provided to YouTube by TuneCore Naked · Marques Houston Naked ℗ 2005 Silent Partner Entertainment Released on: 2005-05-05 Auto-generated by YouTube. Raz B goes off on marques Houston on the phone about Omarion! 'F*ck you B*tch Ima over here trying to forgive someone who had sex with him as he was under the age of 18yrs old' ELYSIUM PRODUCTIONS – Redefining Wedding Filmmaking Worldwide https://www.elysiumproductions.com Insta: @elysiumweddings https://www.facebook.com/elysiumprod... I originally uploaded this video in 2010 under my original acct Latinavixn However I've been finding all of my videos stolen & uploaded by (dianrachmawatidja... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.